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Old 04-15-2011, 11:18 PM
 
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Beside's the a.s.e's what are some other certifications an auto technician can get.

Is there like an advanced auto certificate I can earn?
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
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Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Beside's the a.s.e's what are some other certifications an auto technician can get.

Is there like an advanced auto certificate I can earn?
Wyotech offers a Chassis Fabrication & High-Performance Engines program but it is Very, very expensive - and you will probably end up owing money. Lots of it..

but chassis fab would something that is worth it then if you got into SCCA and started off doing side jobs for people that wanted custom suspension and roll cage so they can track their car you would have some people interested assuming you had a proper shop to work out of
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Old 04-17-2011, 07:56 PM
 
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There are numerous vocational schools throughout the country you earn a certificate from. Though if you plan on getting into the automotive field, employers mainly are looking for actual work experience over classroom.
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TempesT68 View Post
There are numerous vocational schools throughout the country you earn a certificate from. Though if you plan on getting into the automotive field, employers mainly are looking for actual work experience over classroom.

Thats the thing I don't get. All these employeers are only hiring experienced technicians. It's a little frustrating when your just starting out and your trying to break into the field.

BTW I have an automotive certificate froma vocational school.
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:58 AM
 
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You can keep going with your ASE's. There are many levels from component specific certification all the way up to Master and then World Class cert. Never stop taking the tests and keeping those active, they are great to have on your resume and many companies pay bonus money to people who hold them.

As for additional certs, most guys are going to hold additional manufacturer specific certs for training they received while working. Outside of that, they are all pretty much the same as what you already have.

I would personally recommend pursuing diesel as their is a critical shortage of diesel techs in the US, especially heavy duty ones. Barring that, the best way to get started is to start working. Get a job at a national account chain like Firestone, Goodyear, Sears or even Pep Boys. Work hard, take whatever training classes they offer you and stay on top of your ASE's and collect as many as you can. You can generally then parlay than experience and your certs into working at a dealership and after that you will have a lot of options.
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Old 04-18-2011, 02:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Thats the thing I don't get. All these employeers are only hiring experienced technicians. It's a little frustrating when your just starting out and your trying to break into the field.

BTW I have an automotive certificate froma vocational school.
The automotive field is tough to get into and takes a long time to start making any real money. It's difficult to find any kind of entry level positions at a shop unless you know someone that will take you in under their wing. For the most part i've found going to school for the field is a waste of time and money, you're better off just working your way up through the ladders at a jiffy lube or tire place.
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Old 04-18-2011, 02:11 PM
 
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GM has its own tech school,but you need to find a dealer who will sponsor you.The dealers are encouraged to hire apprentice techs that have the factory training certificates . It isn't the same as ASE.
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Old 04-18-2011, 03:25 PM
 
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To the OP

Are you really sure you want to get into this line of work? It's definitely not the easiest or cleanest way to make a living. Busted knuckles, aches and pains and lots of headaches are all in a day's work. Also, get ready to spend a small to medium fortune on tools and a box to keep them in.


But if you decide this is what you want to do, my best advice is to keep your eyes and ears open and gain as much knowledge as possible. That usually means starting at the bottom and getting experience as you go. Try and get a job at a dealer's lube department. When you're not busy, don't be afraid to ask the techs if you can help them or just watch. Volunteer to clean parts, scrape gaskets, etc. As long as you're not slowing them down, most will work with you and be glad to have the help.

After you learn all the basics, you might want to pick a specialty and concentrate on that alone. If I were just starting out today, I would jump all over drivability and electronics. That's where there's big money to be made. Again, become a sponge and soak up all the knowledge you can.

As far as certifications, ASE is great to help you land a job but it doesn't really mean you know what you're doing. I've held the 8 ASE certifications to be a master tech since the early 80's. Does it prove anything? Just that I was willing to take the tests and that someone (usually me) was willing to spend the money for testing. Certification in a particular brand is the way to go and that involves factory schooling. You'll have to prove yourself for an employer to make that kind of investment in you. Most likely you will have to sign a contract stating you agree to work there for a certain length of time or reimburse the cost of the schooling.

Good luck

Last edited by Gimme3steps; 04-18-2011 at 04:29 PM..
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Old 04-18-2011, 06:41 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,689,092 times
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Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
You can keep going with your ASE's. There are many levels from component specific certification all the way up to Master and then World Class cert. Never stop taking the tests and keeping those active, they are great to have on your resume and many companies pay bonus money to people who hold them.

As for additional certs, most guys are going to hold additional manufacturer specific certs for training they received while working. Outside of that, they are all pretty much the same as what you already have.

I would personally recommend pursuing diesel as their is a critical shortage of diesel techs in the US, especially heavy duty ones. Barring that, the best way to get started is to start working. Get a job at a national account chain like Firestone, Goodyear, Sears or even Pep Boys. Work hard, take whatever training classes they offer you and stay on top of your ASE's and collect as many as you can. You can generally then parlay than experience and your certs into working at a dealership and after that you will have a lot of options.
Thank you. I was sort of expecting this type of response.
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Old 04-18-2011, 06:43 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,689,092 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by TempesT68 View Post
The automotive field is tough to get into and takes a long time to start making any real money. It's difficult to find any kind of entry level positions at a shop unless you know someone that will take you in under their wing. For the most part i've found going to school for the field is a waste of time and money, you're better off just working your way up through the ladders at a jiffy lube or tire place.
The only thing the certificate has down was provide a year towards my A.S.E
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