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Old 07-25-2011, 05:24 PM
 
47 posts, read 108,932 times
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The 1957 Lincoln models did not have quad headlights. If you look closely, that is more of a driving light than another full headlight.

57 Chrysler Corporation models offered quads and duals for that years Chryslers, Desotos, and Imperials. It depended on which state the car was headed to because not all states had approved quad headlights in 57. I read somewhere that it depended on whether it was an even or odd date as to which setup was produced.

Same situation with 57 Mercurys. Some had quads and other duals. I do not know which methodology Ford Motor Company used to produce these cars.

ALL fullsize 1957 Nash Ambassador models (yes, Nash) had quad headlights. They were stacked lights and technically, ALL 57 Nash Ambassadors were illegal in those states that had not yet approved quad headlights. 1957 was the last year for the Nash (and Hudson) namplate as for 58, the name Rambler was used across the board by American Motors.

Mr. Bill
Hamlet, NC
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Old 07-26-2011, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Southwest Pa
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Here's how rare a '57 Chrysler 300C with two headlights really is, they made a total of five.
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Old 07-26-2011, 02:44 PM
 
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Wow I want one!

Anyone know any of the states or how many there were that waited till '58 to legalize quad headlights? Seems like that could possibly make the '57 Ambassador rare or atleast in some states.

Are there any other instances of where a certain car was illegal in some states? I guess you could count some for California due to the smog regulations.
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Old 07-27-2011, 07:34 AM
 
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I understand the 1960 Fords were technically illegal in some states because of their width. Some states limited the width of a vehicle and anything over had to have side marker lights. Therefore, something large like a tractor trailer truck or some other larger industrial vehicle was allowed because of the marker lights.

The cars were allowed simply because there were so many of them and also due to the fact that Ford Motor Company responded by manufacturing the 1961 Ford which was a little narrower. If you ever have the opportunity to compare a 60 and 61 side by side, it is evident the 60 is wider.

Regarding 1957 Nash Ambassadors (and Statesmans), they are rare anyhow. The production of the cars were so few, nothing was ever done. However, technically, they were not legal in certain states. Below is a picture of the 57 Nash showing the quad set up. This picture was found on Google Images.


http://ts3.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=1035398560366&id=379f39db1e95af36 2a01180d24ea1adf&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.velocityjour nal.com%2fimages%2ffull%2f2004%2f126%2fna1957ambas sadorcustom1265385.jpg (broken link)



Mr. Bill
Hamlet, NC

Last edited by Avantiguy; 07-27-2011 at 07:45 AM..
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Old 07-27-2011, 07:26 PM
 
47 posts, read 108,932 times
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Regarding quad lights, here are two examples from a make that should have stayed with dual headlights. For 1958, Studebaker-Packard modified 1956-57 fenders to accept quad lights by adding these fiberglass pieces to the single headlight fender. In doing so, dual headlights could be mounted in each fender. However, while the results were not all that great, it did allow S-P a new look for very little money involved. And very little money was what S-P had in 58. Pictures from Google Images.



'58 Studebaker President Starlight 2 door hardtop


'58 Packard Starlight Hardtop


Especially from the side and in profile, all of this piece work was "awkward" looking. '58 Studebaker President shown.

However, I LOVE the 58 Studebakers and Packards.

Mr. Bill
Hamlet, NC

Last edited by Avantiguy; 07-27-2011 at 07:39 PM..
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Old 07-27-2011, 10:36 PM
 
8,380 posts, read 11,551,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avantiguy View Post
The 1957 Lincoln models did not have quad headlights. If you look closely, that is more of a driving light than another full headlight.
And, you determine that how, exactly? So, I suppose it is your thought that when a driver put his foot to the little button on the floor those so called "driving lights" that are not headlights came on but did not serve as brights. And, the "headlights" on a 57 Lincoln coincidentally did not have a bright/dim dual element.

Or is it maybe because only quad headlights of an equal size are really quad headlights in your world?
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Old 07-27-2011, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
18,193 posts, read 15,429,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazzwell View Post
Here's how rare a '57 Chrysler 300C with two headlights really is, they made a total of five.
Is there a source for that? Because I've seen more than five '57 Chrysler 300 Cs (at car shows) and they all had dual headlights.
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:46 AM
 
47 posts, read 108,932 times
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Wilson 513:

"For 1957, Lincoln utilized a novel Quadra-like headlamp system that featured regular lights plus smaller 'road' lights operated via a separate switch. The Quadra-Like system was Lincoln's response to several state legislatures which were threatening in 1956 to block the industry-wide adoption of quad headlamp systems".

Furthermore: Quoting directly from the 1957 Lincoln Sales Brochure: "The bold, massively distinctive Quadra-Lite grille of this new Lincoln sets it apart from all other cars. And the Quadra-Lites--an exclusive new combination of headlights and road lights-- give you a clearer view of the road and the road shoulder".





Note the 57 Lincoln Premiere above. The bottom light is smaller (not by much, I'll give it that) and therefore considered not a "true" headlight, but an auxiliary light. Again, I will agree that it is probably a situation of "splitting hairs" here and at a first or casual glance, appears to be a true headlight, but it is not. This was with certainty, a deliberate act by Ford Motor Company, to make this light as large as they possibly could to give the appearance of a true quad headlight set up and still be able to skirt around the issue with some state's regulations regarding quad headlights.

Now, to address your question, in my world, a true headlight is a true headlight, meaning they are all of the same size, whether duals or quads. I would say the same today just as I would have if I had been living in 1957. Auxilliary, driving lights, fog lights, whatever terminology you want to give them are just that, a light that supplements the regular headlights, selectively operated by the driver utilizing a separate switch.

I am quite familiar with Lincolns of the 56-57 period and consider them to be some of the best looking cars of their day.

Now if you still want to say that it is a "headlight" because it is a light mounted on the front of the car, go right ahead. However, the 1958 Lincoln was the first Lincoln to have a true quad headlight system.

By the way, while I have an original 1957 Lincoln Prestige Sales Brochure in my collection, you can also access a 57 sales brochure online at oldcarmanualproject.com. Do a search for 1957 Lincoln and you will be provided a link to click on where you can see all of this for yourself. Additionally, this brochure also describes the optional, dash mounted automatic headlight control (GM's Autronic Eye which Ford purchased for Lincolns) that controls the high/low beam of the dual headlights, independent of these road lights.

Best regards

Mr. Bill

Last edited by Avantiguy; 07-28-2011 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 07-29-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Southwest Pa
1,009 posts, read 2,167,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
Is there a source for that? Because I've seen more than five '57 Chrysler 300 Cs (at car shows) and they all had dual headlights.

Two headlights...one per side.
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Old 07-29-2011, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
18,193 posts, read 15,429,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazzwell View Post
Two headlights...one per side.
I meant dual as in two per side. And I have seen more than 5 Chrysler 300-Cs (at car shows) which have had that.

None of my books on Chryslers mentions that only 5 were made that way. It was introduced early in 1957, for the 1957 models.
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