U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-21-2011, 06:32 AM
 
Location: The cupboard under the sink
3,574 posts, read 3,934,788 times
Reputation: 6099
Good post, but I'd expect a service such as yours to cost much more than $110, or am I wrong ?

I'd guess for $110, you get a pretty minimal checkover, unless they do things differently in the USA

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
My evaluation approach is somewhat different than what I'm seeing posted so far ...

....
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-21-2011, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,820 posts, read 30,969,684 times
Reputation: 11762
For future problems you need a physchic. Maybe prophet.

A mechanic cna onl identify existing problems. He or she cannot predict what will happen in the future. They can identify exisiting problems that are not year at the level of a disaster (minor cooling system leaks, oil leaks, etc. If someone put something on the car and forgot to tighten the nut fully, a mechanic is not going to know it. However our mechanic has cuasght things that we never thought to check. for example we were looking at a conversion van. we checked th AC - worked great. We did nto think to check the rear AC (we do not sit in the back). Mechanic caughts and it needed $1800 worth of work to repair it. He caught something else that we could have checked but just did no think of (I cannto remember what it was). We ended up passing. Also we have our mechanic check a car that we thought had a transmision problem. turned out it was a $50 repair. They can not only catch stuff, but also tell you how bad something really is.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 02:21 PM
 
10,158 posts, read 16,372,936 times
Reputation: 7923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
For future problems you need a physchic. Maybe prophet.

A mechanic cna onl identify existing problems. He or she cannot predict what will happen in the future. They can identify exisiting problems that are not year at the level of a disaster (minor cooling system leaks, oil leaks, etc. If someone put something on the car and forgot to tighten the nut fully, a mechanic is not going to know it. However our mechanic has cuasght things that we never thought to check. for example we were looking at a conversion van. we checked th AC - worked great. We did nto think to check the rear AC (we do not sit in the back). Mechanic caughts and it needed $1800 worth of work to repair it. He caught something else that we could have checked but just did no think of (I cannto remember what it was). We ended up passing. Also we have our mechanic check a car that we thought had a transmision problem. turned out it was a $50 repair. They can not only catch stuff, but also tell you how bad something really is.
This^^^. Plus on some cars have parts that can't be checked out without pulling the motor or even tearing it apart, so there would be no way to tell if they are "ready to go" or not. There is only so much they can check.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
10,227 posts, read 13,378,654 times
Reputation: 11692
I think that the biggest problems can be averted by getting a check up each year. Invest a little in the machine. So many people just put off doing the maintenance on a car or truck. I like to have a weekly go over on all our rides just to see what is there and to catch things in advance. Sure not everything may be caught but I bet I can catch the majority of things. Also it pays to spend when it comes to getting things done on this big of an investment. You can save on the major stuff by doing the minor stuff.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 03:52 PM
 
8,189 posts, read 21,465,008 times
Reputation: 7823
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobman View Post
Good post, but I'd expect a service such as yours to cost much more than $110, or am I wrong ?

I'd guess for $110, you get a pretty minimal checkover, unless they do things differently in the USA
I've performed a lot of pre-buy inspections on daily transportation cars of average values for $100. These included a couple of miles road test, as well as verifying the functionality of every accessory and system in the car. A look at fluids/conditions, obvious accident/repairs, and a scan if OBD2 equipped. Some cars warranted a hook-up to my ancient o'scope to check out alternator waveforms, ignition wiring/cap/rotor/coil/distributor/igniter type issues.

Many of my pre-buy inspections are performed on high dollar/collectable cars. I've been flown all over the USA to do these inspections, so there's travel costs & per diems in addition to my inspection fee. And the inspection, if warranted, can run into doing compression/leak down tests, minor adjustments on an FI system to verify that it can be set up properly and run properly, filter inspections, etc. Obviously, these can be very lengthy and detailed inspections but when folks are spending 6 figures and up for a vehicle, it can be well justified even running into thousands of dollars for a thorough pre-buy inspection.

Keep in mind that any pre-buy inspection is only to advise you what is found at the inspection to give my client the information they need to make an informed purchase decision. I don't tell them to buy or not to buy a given vehicle. Some folks make it clear upfront that they don't want to buy a vehicle that has any accident damage, so that's my first point of inspection ... and if I find accident damage, we'll stop at that point unless they authorize me to proceed. You'd be surprised at how many vehicles have accident damage that is unknown to the seller at the time ... including vehicles that sustained damage before ever being sold by a dealer on the original MSO as a new vehicle.

For the most part, many of the concerns about a car's condition that I see posted in this thread simply are the most remote, uncommon, rare and isolated circumstances that are seen in the industry. Techs who work on a given line day-in day-out know what the common failure items are, even the ones that are "hidden" within an engine and cannot be evaluated without a tear-down. For examples, some cars recently had a spate of head gasket failures ... a knowledgeable tech will be looking for the related failure signs and advise accordingly. Some other cars had issues with plugged up oil pump pick-ups, which caused isolated issues of oil starvation and engine failures.
The techs on those cars know to check for these issues, look for the signs, and advise of a possible problem area to be addressed or that warrants a tear down to correct.

'nother example ... the later model M-B's that I worked on had plastic oiler tube connectors to the cam bearing towers. In the older models where the valves were adjusted on schedule, these could be readily monitored and replaced as needed. But on the later models with hydraulic valve adjusters and less need to pull the valve covers, these little items would get neglected until they'd failed and a rocker arm/cam lobe had been damaged, an expensive repair. So I wouldn't do a pre-buy for this series of car without pulling the valve covers to inspect the oiler tubes as well as the timing chain/sprockets,/tensioner, etc ... which were also a high wear/failure rate item.

The bottom line is that the competency of a tech doing a pre-buy inspection can vary widely, especially with so many different vehicles available in the marketplace today. That's why a knowledgeable tech experienced with a given product line is essential to a quality informational pre-buy inspection.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,820 posts, read 30,969,684 times
Reputation: 11762
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobman View Post
Good post, but I'd expect a service such as yours to cost much more than $110, or am I wrong ?

I'd guess for $110, you get a pretty minimal checkover, unless they do things differently in the USA
Our mechanic does a thorough check over for free. It probably helps that we probably pay him $5,000 - 10,000 or so a year. He is very very careful about checking out a potential car we are considering. He does not want to lose his best customers.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 08:12 PM
 
8,189 posts, read 21,465,008 times
Reputation: 7823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Our mechanic does a thorough check over for free. It probably helps that we probably pay him $5,000 - 10,000 or so a year. He is very very careful about checking out a potential car we are considering. He does not want to lose his best customers.
That's an interesting concept from a customer relationship marketing standpoint. It assumes that your business with the inspected car will land upon the shop's doorstep.

I did that a couple of times for my established customers, but always came away with a less than satisfactory result. Sometimes the cars came back for the suggested repairs, sometimes they didn't ... especially if the car wasn't purchased by my customer.

Those same customers always charged me their prevailing rates when I needed their professional services. They didn't give away their knowledge, skills, overhead, use of their equipment and such even though I was a repeat and long term customer for them. Nor did they expect that I'd do work for them for free, they know that it costs to provide the service and they were making some very large expenditures based upon my professional services.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2011, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Central Jersey
3,022 posts, read 7,905,196 times
Reputation: 1683
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobman View Post
Apologies for two posts in a row, Mods.

I'm from the UK, but largely, when we'd check a car over for a customer, we'd use the annual test of roadworthiness (MOT) as a guide.
We used different standards on different cars.

I can't imagine the system in the USA being significantly different.
I've watched the T.V. program Wheeler Dealers a number of times and have heard them refer to (MOT) often. There was also another show that featured a couple of guys that specialize in restoring / modifying VW's. They have spoke about issues with vehicles that they were working on at the time that would preclude them from passing MOT. I suspect that the MOT standard in the UK is a lot tougher than many of the state inspection standards here in the U.S.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top