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Old 04-08-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,266,005 times
Reputation: 3202

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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
just a few Diesels make the roadway stink ;especaialy at redlights.
Yes, the diesels made before 2007 had a odor.
But the times have changed modern diesels have emissions systems. Te air coming out of the tail pipe is almost cleaner that when it entered the air filter.

The stink is all most undetectable and there is no longer a cloud of smoke coming out of the tail pipe.

The problem with a system like this (diesel used in this fashion) is getting a emission system to work.

The systems use heat(burn Fuel) to burn the soot turing it into a ash. nox/sox can be addressed with a catalyst and controlling combustion temps and or the use of urea.
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Old 04-08-2012, 10:27 AM
 
8,089 posts, read 15,924,428 times
Reputation: 8125
Diesel-electric hybrids would be extremely fuel-efficient. That said, the current crop of diesels being sold in Europe with "auto-stop" technology that shuts the engine down when the vehicle is stopped, say at a stoplight, then restarts it when the driver lets his foot off of the brake, achieve near-hybrid fuel efficiency without the weight and complexity of a full hybrid.

While I generally agree with much of what StealthRabbit posts, he is incorrect about diesel fuel standards in the US and Europe. The sulfur-content standard for diesel fuel in both places is now 15 ppm, which is the definition of Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel fuel (ULSD). Only a few marine, industrial, and railroad applications can use diesel fuel with higher sulfur content in the US, and they come under the ULSD requirement in a couple of years. The culprit in lack of availability of diesel-powered vehicles in the US is a combination of this country's more restrictive emission standards and of buyer resistance--the latter exemplified quite well by people like Texdav who haven't really looked at today's very clean-running diesel engines. With most of the new diesels, you could literally stick your nose up the tailpipe (not advised, your nose would get burned) and not smell the exhaust. As I've posted numerous times before, the problem with the EPA's myopic diesel emission standards is that they concentrate only on the tailpipe emissions and not all of the upstream emissions that the overly strict tailpipe emission standards cause because of extra fuel consumption. A more balanced approach (such as the EPA simply adopting the current European standard) would probably lead to no more total emissions from oil well to tailpipe, would improve both individual vehicle and fleet fuel economy, and open the US market to a slew of much more fuel-efficient vehicles--including a number of vehicles built by US manufacturers, but that they can not currently sell here.
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Old 04-09-2012, 12:40 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 2,458,850 times
Reputation: 3401
The problem with this is that the regulations require emissions control systems that other countries do not. Such as DEF injector and catalyst. This adds about $7k to the vehicle price and automakers, understandably so, don't want to be first to make the leap in most classes of vehicles that don't currently have diesels. They'll offer large diesels in trucks but truck buyers will pay another $10k for it.

In the case of a diesel hybrid, I'm not sure how that would work exactly, whether it would just be a diesel generator that powers an electric motor or a diesel engine that works along side an electric motor but in either case there isn't really enough of a savings to warrant the extra cost. I think diesel costs more in most states and when you consider the extra cost to buy the car with the higher cost per gallon, the extra mileage gained isn't really significant enough to make sense.

I *was* all for bringing small diesels to america but it's pretty clear that's never going to happen and at this point, I'd hold out until there's a plug-in hybrid pickup in my price range.
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Old 04-09-2012, 12:44 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 2,458,850 times
Reputation: 3401
Quote:
Originally Posted by DVDFreaker View Post
You can always move or ask to ship the car
You may be able to ship the car but if registering the car is another matter.
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:56 PM
 
8,089 posts, read 15,924,428 times
Reputation: 8125
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
The problem with this is that the regulations require emissions control systems that other countries do not. Such as DEF injector and catalyst. This adds about $7k to the vehicle price and automakers, understandably so, don't want to be first to make the leap in most classes of vehicles that don't currently have diesels. They'll offer large diesels in trucks but truck buyers will pay another $10k for it.
That really isn't accurate. The current purchase price premium for a diesel pickup over a gasoline engine model is about $7K-$8K. That include the engine, upgraded transmission, heavier suspension (the diesel engine is heavier), heavier duty electrical system, and the emission components. I suspect the DEF system and catalyst is probably only about a quarter of that price premium. My experience with those newer (2011-2012) diesels is that they will best a gas engine model in fuel economy by 30%-40% when driving unladen on the highway, and often by more than that when the vehicles are carrying or towing comparable loads. That more than offsets the higher cost for diesel fuel, but admittedly will take a long time to pay back the higher initial cost.

Interestingly, in my area, the price spread between diesel fuel and gasoline has narrowed considerably in the last few weeks--both have been increasing in price, but gasoline has been rising much more quickly of late.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:42 PM
 
202 posts, read 312,728 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DVDFreaker View Post
You can always move or ask to ship the car
$$$$$$
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:47 PM
 
202 posts, read 312,728 times
Reputation: 105
Wouldn't the Volt have increased it's efficency if it had used a small turbo-diesel as the generator engine. I've read that its gasoline only mode, after you've run down the battery or not charged it, is around 40mpg if you drive around on generator/regen braking only. I would think the constant speed the engine would run to power the generator would be ideal for a diesel engine.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:59 AM
 
311 posts, read 373,410 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsh56 View Post
Unfortunately, Volvo has been sold to the Chinese, so we will have to see if the quality goes down hill
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Denver
1,476 posts, read 3,801,678 times
Reputation: 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
just a few Diesels make the roadway stink ;especaialy at redlights.
Good enough to deliver almost everything you consume but not good enough to drive for an everyday car.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Southwest Nebraska
1,297 posts, read 2,544,815 times
Reputation: 846
I read that Jeep Cherokee is coming out with diesel in 2013 I think.
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