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View Poll Results: Are Subarus a Regional Vehicle
Yes 42 68.85%
No 19 31.15%
Voters: 61. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
13,047 posts, read 14,652,567 times
Reputation: 8425

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I think a lot of people here seem to think that AWD is not useful except in poor traction situations.

Many of the world's best cars are AWD and not expected to be driven in poor weather. Four driven wheels provides better traction in all conditions and can deliver enhanced handling. They can be safer by controlling understeer/oversteer.

I would consider a Subaru because they are good vehicles. AWD is just a plus.
Most of the expensive AWD vehicles aren't full time 4WD, and that's how these save fuel. In the case of several of the Subaru automobiles the four wheels are engaged, and that's the reason why they use more fuel than they should. However, this is a desirable feature with a lot of people.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:10 PM
Status: "More snow please" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,399 posts, read 21,482,632 times
Reputation: 7806
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
You know, there are other cars that do the job that a Subaru can do. There are many demographic studies attached to Subarus. They are often driven by educated liberals who like the outdoors, or pretend to. You will see them in any college town, and it's "ivory tower" professors and workers at the colleges who drive them....Ann Arbor, Madison, Eugene, Boulder. It's a well-known fact that Subarus are popular among lesbians. Lesbians seem to love college towns, too. So, the demographic relationships start becoming circular.

Heck, a four-door Ford Fusion with a 4-cylinder is as reliable (check the consumer guides) as is any Subaru sedan if the AWD is not a must. It just doesn't make a statement.
Demographic studies are useless if the brand has already cornered several niche markets. Marketing 101... Subaru had the wagon covered at a time when most had abandoned it in favor of sedans or larger SUVs. Subaru also had the AWD system mastered before many automakers offered it as an option. Subaru also had favorable pricing and reliability working in its favor along with a LOYAL customer base. The fact that Subaru is NOT a high volume automaker works to its advantage I think.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:14 PM
Status: "More snow please" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,399 posts, read 21,482,632 times
Reputation: 7806
Quote:
Originally Posted by a bag of it View Post
Subaru's are definitely a regional thing. They're everywhere here in Colorado, much more so than in New England. In New England they also seemed to increase in concentration the further north you go, supporting the bad weather car idea. I bought my wrx for snow performance primarily, but I still wanted a sporty car for dry roads. It's nothing compared to my m3, buy it's infinitely better in the snow.

Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note
A prime example of that would be the North Country town of Lyndon, VT, home to Lyndon State College. This is also the alma mater of Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore. It might as well have been ground zero for Subaru concentration given the 1) Lots of snow 2) College nearby 3) Mountain and Winter Recreation Nearby.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
5,736 posts, read 4,078,952 times
Reputation: 4175
Not very many around here. AWD just isn't a big selling point. This is probably the only part of the country where AWD crossovers, SUVs and sedans don't bring any extra money and can actually be a turn off to some buyers. Subsets are typecast as rides for alternative lifestyle people, college professors and finally tuners.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Floribama
9,049 posts, read 16,475,389 times
Reputation: 5508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
Not very many around here. AWD just isn't a big selling point. This is probably the only part of the country where AWD crossovers, SUVs and sedans don't bring any extra money and can actually be a turn off to some buyers. Subsets are typecast as rides for alternative lifestyle people, college professors and finally tuners.
True, I think AWD actually decreases the value of used vehicles in the South, it's seen as something more expensive to repair when it breaks down, and like mentioned, it's not needed.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,870 posts, read 5,467,953 times
Reputation: 3215
Quote:
Please ignore what I say, because I have only been building boosted motors for 30 years.
Please ignore what I say, because I have only been wrenching, operating, driving turbo equipped vehicles from trucks to heavy equipment for 32years.



Quote:
The standard way to regulate a turbo is utilizing a waste-gate.
While a waste gate is a option .
Some can deal with drive pressures with out utilizing one.

,
Quote:
The turbo compensates for altitude by spinning faster at high altitudes to maintain constant pressure.
The speed it spins at is determined by the drive pressure. It will spin at the same speed at sea level as at 12thousaand feet. It will not spin faster at ALT as it will not have more drive pressure just because it is at ALT.



Quote:

(As an aside, posts that are made from those simply cutting and pasting, i.e from here: Turbo FAQs are really annoying to those that have first-hand experience. Hint. But I have learned the MO).



Hint: few believe you/me just because you/me say it is so.
So I backed up my position by utilizing a link and info.

so the MO is to back up what I say with a second source other just relaying on say so.

" Turbo FAQs are really annoying to those that have first-hand experience"
If you say so.

What if they are not as "learned" as you are?
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
8,928 posts, read 7,262,783 times
Reputation: 12485
Definitely regional. When I lived in the Southeast, I could drive around my town of 100,000 and see a handful of Subarus, usually Foresters. But here, some days it seems like every other car is a Subaru! I can safely say I've never set foot outdoors here without seeing at least one, unless I happen to stay on a trail where I won't see any cars. If I were to go take a nice long walk at this very moment, I can promise you I'd see at least two dozen, probably more. In fact, if I can remember, next time I'm out I'll (try to) count how many Subarus I see. I'll probably have to take a note pad. As I'm finishing this paragraph, I Forester just drove past my apartment.

Personally, I like Subarus. At least, I like what I see; I've never driven one or even been inside one. But if I were in the market for a car, I'd probably get something else. I like smaller station wagons and hatchbacks, and in fact I think the newer Subarus are a little larger than I'd prefer. I don't own a car now (and don't especially care to), but if I were to get one I'd probably look for some Japanese wagon, probably 80s or very early 90s. Come to think of it, the only car I'd really consider buying would be an old Honda Wagovan (with AWD preferably, although I wouldn't need it).
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:13 PM
 
8,177 posts, read 16,209,860 times
Reputation: 8261
Subarus are more popular in areas with inclement weather and/or poorly maintained backroads. They achieved that popularity for several reasons:

1. For an AWD vehicle, they get reasonably good fuel economy (not great, by any means, but OK).

2. They have been selling AWD's in the US longer than most auto manufacturers.

3. They have generally been pretty reliable (though I have couple of friends who, despite being very diligent about maintenance, have had serious mechanical problems with their Subies at relatively low mileages).

4. Subaru has designed at least some of their models, notably the Forester and Outback, to have very good ground clearance for an AWD (around 8.5"), which gives them some backcountry capability that many other AWD's simply do not have. They are not a "true" off-road 4WD with severe off-road capability, but few buyers really need that.

My personal opinion is that a Subaru is only a very attractive vehicle because of its AWD system. Take away that and it is a fairly mediocre vehicle. At this point, I think there are some competitive vehicles, such as the Toyota RAV4, that are actually better vehicles all-around. Subaru had better be figuring out how to make their vehicles more fuel-efficient, or a lot of potential buyers are going to "defect" to other offerings. The new Impreza is a start, but, with it, important things like ground clearance were sacrificed to get the numbers.
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Old 04-23-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: 206
176 posts, read 308,816 times
Reputation: 163
I would say they are regional to a certain extent. Like Lamplight said when we lived in Seattle they were EVERYWHERE. Which makes sense because our WRX does awesome in rain/snow and when its dry out the AWD and handling are a blast around corners! The car is a lot of fun.

We now live on the coast of South Carolina.........There is no snow or mountains or well hills or anything really to use the AWD. Cant even drive on the beach which was a blast back home in the WRX.

Im sure when its dry here the AWD/handling would also be a blast around the corners.........if we had any corners. ANY.


So really I can see why you dont see any here, if I was going to be permanently residing here I would have sold the Subaru before we even moved. Fuel economy honestly is not that bad either. My awd CRV gets on average 25mpg and is a 130hp gutless pig (although I do like it). The WRX also averages 25mpg and is 240hp and fun to drive. They both have about the same interior room and storage (my WRX is wagon) If I had to choose one or the other the CRV would get the boot.
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Old 04-23-2012, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Rio Rancho, NM
62 posts, read 102,797 times
Reputation: 60
Tons of older outbacks here around Albuquerque, and especially Santa Fe. And apparently they all come factory with Obama bumper stickers.
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