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Old 04-27-2012, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Southwest Arkansas
774 posts, read 651,257 times
Reputation: 831

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Best- Texas they lack.pot holes and such but the layout is totaly idiotic
Worst- Arkansas our highways are improving but still washboards
And don't even ask about most of the railroad crossings
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,678,118 times
Reputation: 7984
Quote:
Originally Posted by onceahogalwaysahog View Post
Best- Texas they lack.pot holes and such but the layout is totaly idiotic
Worst- Arkansas our highways are improving but still washboards
And don't even ask about most of the railroad crossings
HA! I've driving through Arkansas and your roads are much better than Louisiana. Our state's engineers in charge of roads claim the problem is Louisiana's soft soil which seems to end at the imaginary state line. Soil geology does not recognize state borders.
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,320,894 times
Reputation: 3517
Illinois, around Chicago has the worst roads I have ever seen in my life.
It would be easier to drive on them if they just removed all the pavement once and for all.

As for bests, well a lot of states have decent roads. It varies from place to place. But Chicago roads are the worst!!
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:12 AM
 
14,469 posts, read 17,337,778 times
Reputation: 19138
An amazing, yet true, tale that is related to very bad road conditions:

Back in the early '80s, the state of Connecticut was in dire financial straits, and had not repaired its highways for many years. The roads were in such bad condition that some people sued (successfully) for damage to their tires and front ends, and some were successful in lawsuits alleging that the crappy road conditions were a factor in car accidents.

The reaction of the state government was to enact legislation stating that...believe it or not...all state highways in Connecticut were officially closed, and that anyone driving on those highways accepted all risk of driving on those roads. They actually erected signs bearing the text of this legislation, printed in a font not much bigger than what you see on this screen.

When entering Connecticut, if you were VERY observant, you might have seen a road sign measuring--perhaps--3 ft X 2 ft, with a white background. At the top, in a slightly bigger font than what you see on this screen, it said "Public Notice", in red. Then, below that, was the text of the legislation.

The "joker in the deck", of course, was that it was IMPOSSIBLE to read this tiny text from a moving vehicle. When driving into that state, I used to see these signs, but could never read what they stated. However, on one occasion, I managed to walk up to one that was near a fast food joint, and was able to see that the sign contained many paragraphs of legalese, along with the information about all state highways in CT being officially closed.

Whether this actually prevented anyone from successfully suing for damages from the incredibly bad roads that CT had in those days, I don't know. However, I do know that this was a really scummy way for that state to try to avoid responsibility for failing to maintain their roads.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:30 AM
 
105 posts, read 176,563 times
Reputation: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
When entering Connecticut, if you were VERY observant, you might have seen a road sign measuring--perhaps--3 ft X 2 ft, with a white background. At the top, in a slightly bigger font than what you see on this screen, it said "Public Notice", in red. Then, below that, was the text of the legislation.
Wow thanks for this information. I had noticed this sign while I was in CT. I always wondered what this is all about. I had moved to CT from Colorado and was very sad to see the condition of roads compared to that in Colorado.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:38 AM
 
21,494 posts, read 11,595,731 times
Reputation: 12265
I can't really complain about Minnesota roads. I was up in North Dakota last fall and saw nothing but perfect roads, even the back roads were in great shape.
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Old 04-27-2012, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,520 posts, read 62,925,435 times
Reputation: 30546
We are not there yet, but within the next three year we will win the worst roads competition.

Michigan.
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Old 04-27-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,231,932 times
Reputation: 36087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post

Michigan.
I agree. Michigan has the sparsest network of rural paved highways. And the main roads don't go where you want to go, and you always have to go around the long way. For example, from Traverse City to Mackinac Bridge, the shortest way is over about 20 miles of a narrow county highway, and even that is not very direct. There are only a few numbered county roads. Hundreds, maybe thousands of miles of county roads are not plowed, and are closed in winter.

Lenawee, Hillsdale, Cass, Newaygo, Sanilac, Tuscola, Marquette and Grand Traverse are the among the dozen most populous counties in the US that are not connected to the Interstate system by a four-lane road, and the first six don't have a single mile of rural 4-lane road within their borders.

Last edited by jtur88; 04-27-2012 at 12:08 PM..
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:24 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
3,305 posts, read 9,519,616 times
Reputation: 2943
The only places in the US that I have been really taken back by the poor condition of the roadways would have to be Detroit and Niagara Falls. Understandable circumstances on both accounts though.
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: FL
1,716 posts, read 2,624,134 times
Reputation: 1852
Worst- Michigan, not knocking the state, but with the extreme weather conditions it's an uphill battle. Most of the 4 lane divided and Interstates are all right but a lot of the city roads will bust your car up bad.

Best-FL, nice and smooth and a pleasure to drive on except for Orlando where there's a toll booth every few miles to extract every last cent out of theme park visitors.
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