U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-22-2012, 12:41 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX USA
5,162 posts, read 9,730,188 times
Reputation: 7949

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
I think your best bet is to get hired on at some automotive shop - any shop. You've gotta start somewhere. Work your way up. It'll take time, but you'll learn what you need along the way. Opening your own shop is something you probably shouldn't do for quite a few years.

Learn the trade first - from the inside. You'll do fine.

Hes been there, he dosnt want to put in the time, to start from the bottom and learn. He wants Master level tech money, with entry level experence.

Last edited by Me007gold; 11-22-2012 at 01:03 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:20 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,908,213 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
I think your best bet is to get hired on at some automotive shop - any shop. You've gotta start somewhere. Work your way up. It'll take time, but you'll learn what you need along the way. Opening your own shop is something you probably shouldn't do for quite a few years.

Learn the trade first - from the inside. You'll do fine.
I work at a nissan dealership as a high c level tech. It really doesn't take that long to move up. I have been in the field for about a year and a half. Its not only about how much its about what you do with your time that determines your experience level.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:22 PM
 
19,025 posts, read 22,230,142 times
Reputation: 7326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Most of the tools you have for auto-tech will be the same as what you'd need for motorcycles. Metric tools are a must.

Motorcycle repair is, in my opinion, more like auto technology than is diesel repair. Diesels are just a whole different breed of engines, and are typically used for very different purposes.


Are you wanting to do this professionally, or are you just wanting to improve your own skills?
This past Spring I saw a diesel motorcycle. Run a google search and you will find them now.. I haven't been able to get a test ride on one yet...

To the OP, the tools are either SAE American sizes, or metric. You won't need Wentworth or British Standard anymore.

With out school from somewhere you won't get very far anymore. There is just too much to know and learn.

The other way is to start as PDI pre delivery inspection, where you sweep the shop, and set up new cars that come dirty off the truck. These will need certain items installed, or in the case of bikes to be un-crated with care and install the handle bars mirrors and ft wheels.

What are or IS HEVs, and EVs? No clue, means nothing to me.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:30 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,342,746 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
This past Spring I saw a diesel motorcycle. Run a google search and you will find them now.. I haven't been able to get a test ride on one yet...
Yeah, I've heard of diesel motorcycles, and have watched a YouTube video or two. I get about 45 mpg on my 1500 Vulcan. I'd be curious to know what kind of mileage a diesel v-twin might get.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:37 PM
 
19,025 posts, read 22,230,142 times
Reputation: 7326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Yeah, I've heard of diesel motorcycles, and have watched a YouTube video or two. I get about 45 mpg on my 1500 Vulcan. I'd be curious to know what kind of mileage a diesel v-twin might get.
No chit you got a 1500 Vulcan what? I have a 06 1600 Nomad as my daily ride... I have a 1981 XS 850 Sh yammi too.

I dunno but I was very curios about the diesel i saw. It was at the White Horse Press Grand Opening which is a yearly event in Conway NH. The sell books of course, but also rain gear tools and assorted other rider related stuff. They like bikers and dogs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:44 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,908,213 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteboyslo View Post
I bought my first diesel about a year ago, an old Ford pickup with the 7.3L International IDI (NOT Powerstroke) engine. It's been really fun working on it and learning the differences between diesel and gas. In some ways, it's a much simpler system, but then again mine has zero emissions crap on it (its biggest selling point for me), so take that with a grain of salt. But, as snofarmer pointed out, once you understand how the system really works and how it differs from a gasser, it's really not that bad. Also, I've found that there are a TON of VERY knowledgeable dieselheads out there for any engine, and all seem more than happy to share their knowledge with you, moreso than the gasser guys. That's just my $.02 anyway.

Now, for bikes, it's really all the same as the gasser but compacted into a much tighter package. It requires a bit more patience to work on, and a bit more meticulous of an approach. Screwing up a job on a car will leave someone stranded. Screwing up a job on a bike could leave the rider laying in the middle of the road.

As for specialty tools, I wrench on my truck, my car, and my bikes all with the same stuff. While every make and model may have some unique tooling that needs to be purchased or made, I don't think you'll run across a lot of unique tooling specific to either diesels or bikes. The only exception I can think of would be some tooling for chains on a bike and the right machine adapters to be able to mount and balance a motorcycle wheel since a bike shop probably does more tire change services than any other job.

To be honest, the idea you have for your shop is unique but maybe a difficult sell to the average gearhead. Right or wrong, diesel guys want shops that specialize in diesel and bike guys want shops that specialize in bikes. Why? My guess is because owning either is a bit of a specialty thing, usually not ventured into unless you're a person somewhat mechanically inclined to handle the extra work involved. As such, if/when work is needed that goes above your level of competence (or desire to do the job), you look for a shop that goes above and beyond what you could do, and shops that specialize in one type of vehicle or technology usually have that. No one wants a mechanic that 'dabbles' in diesel. So, for this idea to work, you'd have to really prove your chops so that you get a rep more as a Rennaisance Man of all mechanical beasts than someone who cannot decide which field they want to specialize in, if you catch my drift.

Good luck!

Mike
Thanks for the advice and thanks for the luck. You made some valid points. I want to be an expert in all those areas and not seen as a jack of trades and viewed as the guy who can do a little bit of this or a little bit of that. I kind of figured that bikes required more finesse to work on because their engines are smaller. I can't wait to get started.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 05:54 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,908,213 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me007gold View Post
Hes been there, he dosnt want to put in the time, to start from the bottom and learn. He wants Master level tech money, with entry level experence.
I can't speak for motorcycles or diesal cars but when it came to gasoline powered cars i Iearned them quickly because Idid not waste time depending on my job to teach me. If I did I would still only be changing oil and doing tire rotations. The fastest way to advance is to learn on your own.

I'm using my phone btw. I apologize for the grammer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 06:00 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,908,213 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_J View Post
Well the best source of service/repair knowledge other than a school is the *factory* service manuals for specific vehicles. Those can be 2000 pages of information for one specific model vehicle.

Might want to get a subscription to alldata.com and start reading...

ALLDATA Repair - ALLDATA
I agree. Thanks for the suggestion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Wake County, NC
2,983 posts, read 3,792,455 times
Reputation: 3505
If you want to work on diesels I would highly recommend that you go to tech school or work under a diesel tech if that is at all possible. I've owned diesels in the past and there is no way I would have let someone inexperienced come anywhere near my engine. I never needed much work on them, but I had a very experienced mechanic when I did need work done.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2012, 06:18 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,342,746 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
No chit you got a 1500 Vulcan what? I have a 06 1600 Nomad as my daily ride... I have a 1981 XS 850 Sh yammi too.

I dunno but I was very curios about the diesel i saw. It was at the White Horse Press Grand Opening which is a yearly event in Conway NH. The sell books of course, but also rain gear tools and assorted other rider related stuff. They like bikers and dogs
Yeah. '05 1500 Vulcan Classic. Basically stock. It's just a danged nice ride. Bought it new, and have done absolutely nothing to it but replace tires & brakes.

My problem with motorcycles is that if I let myself, I'd buy about 80 of them. Maybe more. And for some reason, I'm not thinking my wife would be that impressed...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top