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Old 11-22-2012, 08:07 AM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,876,076 times
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I have a general knowledge on diesal cars. I know their compression ratio is different and they also use glow plugs instead of spark plugs but pretty much everything is the same as a gasoline powered engine.

My knowledge on motorcycles is very vague. I have a general knowledge on them but nothing specific.

I have about 5,000$ worth of tools (which isn't much I'm still buying). Are the tools used on a motorcycle about the same as the tools used on a gasoline powered vehicle?

I've already covered HEVs, and EVs since I'm going to school now for electrical engineering.

Trade schools are scam artist and I wish I never went for automotive technology. I learned everything I know today out in the field, reading on my own and tinkering on my own cars.

I want to be able to work on pretty much everything and really have a diverse skillset. I also figure the knowledge shared within all 3 trades will make me more effective in all 3 areas.

I'm not a Master Technician, I'm just a C level tech working his way to B- Level.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,013,965 times
Reputation: 3566
Not all diesels use glow~plugs some use a grid heater and they do not serve The same purpose as spark plugs.
Compression ignition VS spark ignition.
Diesels produce very little VAC compared to a gas engine.
Use totally different fuels.
High PIS injection pump on the diesel.
"the same" as they both use pistons, sure, but there are many differences.
A diesel does not have a throttle body or a venturi in the intake.
A diesel does not have a distributor for the spark plugs that it doesn't have.

so yea there the same

Go to school.
There are vocational schools just for diesel technicians.
Cummins or any doesel shop is not going to hire you just because you have shade-tree experience.
Well they might if they need someone to clean the shop after hours

Last edited by snofarmer; 11-22-2012 at 08:28 AM..
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:22 AM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,301,093 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
I have a general knowledge on diesal cars. I know their compression ratio is different and they also use glow plugs instead of spark plugs but pretty much everything is the same as a gasoline powered engine.

My knowledge on motorcycles is very vague. I have a general knowledge on them but nothing specific.

I have about 5,000$ worth of tools (which isn't much I'm still buying). Are the tools used on a motorcycle about the same as the tools used on a gasoline powered vehicle?

I'm not a Master Technician, I'm just a C level tech working his way to B- Level.
Most of the tools you have for auto-tech will be the same as what you'd need for motorcycles. Metric tools are a must.

Motorcycle repair is, in my opinion, more like auto technology than is diesel repair. Diesels are just a whole different breed of engines, and are typically used for very different purposes.


Are you wanting to do this professionally, or are you just wanting to improve your own skills?
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:44 AM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,876,076 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Most of the tools you have for auto-tech will be the same as what you'd need for motorcycles. Metric tools are a must.

Motorcycle repair is, in my opinion, more like auto technology than is diesel repair. Diesels are just a whole different breed of engines, and are typically used for very different purposes.


Are you wanting to do this professionally, or are you just wanting to improve your own skills?
A little bit of both. I want to open my own garage soon and be able to work on diesals as well as motorcycles. I also want the knowledge as well.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,013,965 times
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I'm sure you want to include all motorized vehicles.
This insures a large client base.(to a point)

auto(gas) shops are a dime a dozen.
Cycle shops are $0.50 a dozen.
A diesel shop is $2 a dozen.
Not because a diesel is all that.
Not just because diesel is all that, but finding a good independent diesel shop is harder to find that the others.

I like a shop that specializes in one or the other.
Bikers like to go to a bike shop.
Diesel heads like to go to a diesel shop.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:54 AM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,876,076 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
Not all diesels use glow~plugs some use a grid heater and they do not serve The same purpose as spark plugs.
Compression ignition VS spark ignition.
Diesels produce very little VAC compared to a gas engine.
Use totally different fuels.
High PIS injection pump on the diesel.
"the same" as they both use pistons, sure, but there are many differences.
A diesel does not have a throttle body or a venturi in the intake.
A diesel does not have a distributor for the spark plugs that it doesn't have.

so yea there the same

Go to school.
There are vocational schools just for diesel technicians.
Cummins or any doesel shop is not going to hire you just because you have shade-tree experience.
Well they might if they need someone to clean the shop after hours
Vocational schools are not an option. They barely teach you anything, their expensive, and their a big waste of time. I've already made the mistake of going to a trade school once for automotive technology Iwont make that mistake again.
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:57 AM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,301,093 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Vocational schools are not an option. They barely teach you anything, their expensive, and their a big waste of time. I've already made the mistake of going to a trade school once for automotive technology Iwont make that mistake again.
I think your best bet is to get hired on at some automotive shop - any shop. You've gotta start somewhere. Work your way up. It'll take time, but you'll learn what you need along the way. Opening your own shop is something you probably shouldn't do for quite a few years.

Learn the trade first - from the inside. You'll do fine.
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Old 11-22-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,013,965 times
Reputation: 3566
Not a trade school like abc diesel tech school.
I agree a trade school is useless.
But a vocational school, ie a Technical College is a different animal.
I went to a technical College for auto repair.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Vocational schools are not an option. They barely teach you anything, their expensive, and their a big waste of time. I've already made the mistake of going to a trade school once for automotive technology Iwont make that mistake again.

But then again you don't have to know squat about any vehicles to open a shop.
It just takes money and hire knowledgeable certified employes.
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Old 11-22-2012, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Poway, CA
2,698 posts, read 9,885,780 times
Reputation: 2227
I bought my first diesel about a year ago, an old Ford pickup with the 7.3L International IDI (NOT Powerstroke) engine. It's been really fun working on it and learning the differences between diesel and gas. In some ways, it's a much simpler system, but then again mine has zero emissions crap on it (its biggest selling point for me), so take that with a grain of salt. But, as snofarmer pointed out, once you understand how the system really works and how it differs from a gasser, it's really not that bad. Also, I've found that there are a TON of VERY knowledgeable dieselheads out there for any engine, and all seem more than happy to share their knowledge with you, moreso than the gasser guys. That's just my $.02 anyway.

Now, for bikes, it's really all the same as the gasser but compacted into a much tighter package. It requires a bit more patience to work on, and a bit more meticulous of an approach. Screwing up a job on a car will leave someone stranded. Screwing up a job on a bike could leave the rider laying in the middle of the road.

As for specialty tools, I wrench on my truck, my car, and my bikes all with the same stuff. While every make and model may have some unique tooling that needs to be purchased or made, I don't think you'll run across a lot of unique tooling specific to either diesels or bikes. The only exception I can think of would be some tooling for chains on a bike and the right machine adapters to be able to mount and balance a motorcycle wheel since a bike shop probably does more tire change services than any other job.

To be honest, the idea you have for your shop is unique but maybe a difficult sell to the average gearhead. Right or wrong, diesel guys want shops that specialize in diesel and bike guys want shops that specialize in bikes. Why? My guess is because owning either is a bit of a specialty thing, usually not ventured into unless you're a person somewhat mechanically inclined to handle the extra work involved. As such, if/when work is needed that goes above your level of competence (or desire to do the job), you look for a shop that goes above and beyond what you could do, and shops that specialize in one type of vehicle or technology usually have that. No one wants a mechanic that 'dabbles' in diesel. So, for this idea to work, you'd have to really prove your chops so that you get a rep more as a Rennaisance Man of all mechanical beasts than someone who cannot decide which field they want to specialize in, if you catch my drift.

Good luck!

Mike
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Old 11-22-2012, 12:03 PM
 
4,762 posts, read 10,943,692 times
Reputation: 7843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
Vocational schools are not an option. They barely teach you anything, their expensive, and their a big waste of time. I've already made the mistake of going to a trade school once for automotive technology Iwont make that mistake again.
Well the best source of service/repair knowledge other than a school is the *factory* service manuals for specific vehicles. Those can be 2000 pages of information for one specific model vehicle.

Might want to get a subscription to alldata.com and start reading...

ALLDATA Repair - ALLDATA
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