U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2013, 08:13 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,904,906 times
Reputation: 1399

Advertisements

Well after 2 years of working in the field as an entry level/c lvel automotive technician I have to say I'm already disappointed.

I'm getting no where fast.

The progress is slow.

The pay is low for what I'm doing.

I enjoy sidework and I enjoy working on my car in my spare time.

I still want to open my own car shop but I will get there faster with a career that pays more money.

Are there jobs that are in demand, pay decently and do not require too much training to get started?

Are there jobs that an auto technician can transfer to fairly easy?

Advice and help please.
Thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2013, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Maryland Heights, MO
3,293 posts, read 6,997,414 times
Reputation: 2003
I think most of us knew you were wanting to get out of your current job for quite some time, even when you were trying to find alternative work in the same field.

Here's the unfortunate part, pay (i.e. compensation) is typically dependent on a few things: Required Prerequisite Training, and Desirability.

Let's put it in perspective.

Job 1: The work is fun, and career entry is easy.
Job 2: The work is fun, but career entry is difficult.
Job 3. The work is hard, but career entry is easy.
Job 4. The work is hard, and career entry is difficult.

The job with the most applicants is likely Job 1. Folks will suffer through low wages for a job that's enjoyable, so it won't pay high, and the job can be filled from folks from all walks of life, without a high requirement to perform the tasks. Job 2 will likely have less applicants because there are less qualified applicants competing, pay as a result might be higher, and the job is still fun. Job 3 will be similar to job 2, expect higher pay to compensate for the hard work, but you'll be competing with numerous individuals to get the job. Not everyone wants to work hard, remember? Job 4 will likely pay the best, the work will be difficult, but overachievers flock to this sort of thing, and career entry isn't a breeze either (think, doctors and lawyers).

So now the biggest thing to do is position yourself for one of these careers. You're in search of better financial incentives, but do not want to push for those additional skills (not trying to sound negative with that). As a result, your best pay options would probably come from Job category 3. The work will be difficult in numerous ways, whether that's physical or mental, but hopefully you won't have to use lots of certificates to get in the job.

I had an awful lot of friends in college who earned degrees in Automotive Technology and are doing well for themselves. Several of them turned wrenches for a bit, but most have worked their way onto management positions, sales, product testing, etc. Turning the wrench can be a very rewarding job, and for a lot of folks, it's a perfect existence that offers you upto side work, odd jobs, etc...If you're wanting to do something like that, just away from the dealership, then that's exactly what you should do. Get away from the dealership networks, find some independent automotive shops, be humble, but bring your certifications with you. Take the job that the independent shop has to offer, whether that be sweeping floors, emptying trash cans, or running to the dealership to acquire parts. But do that job to the absolute best of your ability, and welcome new responsibilities as they're handed to you. Remember your manners, be appreciative, and open to advice. No one hates a know-it-all more than someone that actually does know-it-all (aka, the guy who's been in the job for 20+ years).

From there, start building a resume, start networking. Even a fun job can suck at times if the $ is enough, I had a friend who built classics for several years and left because he wasn't getting paid enough. He started his own business delivering exercise equipment, after making a bit money doing that work he's back working in an autobody shop a good friend owns and isn't worried nearly as much about his financial situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2013, 09:33 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,904,906 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by flynavyj View Post
I think most of us knew you were wanting to get out of your current job for quite some time, even when you were trying to find alternative work in the same field.

Here's the unfortunate part, pay (i.e. compensation) is typically dependent on a few things: Required Prerequisite Training, and Desirability.

Let's put it in perspective.

Job 1: The work is fun, and career entry is easy.
Job 2: The work is fun, but career entry is difficult.
Job 3. The work is hard, but career entry is easy.
Job 4. The work is hard, and career entry is difficult.

The job with the most applicants is likely Job 1. Folks will suffer through low wages for a job that's enjoyable, so it won't pay high, and the job can be filled from folks from all walks of life, without a high requirement to perform the tasks. Job 2 will likely have less applicants because there are less qualified applicants competing, pay as a result might be higher, and the job is still fun. Job 3 will be similar to job 2, expect higher pay to compensate for the hard work, but you'll be competing with numerous individuals to get the job. Not everyone wants to work hard, remember? Job 4 will likely pay the best, the work will be difficult, but overachievers flock to this sort of thing, and career entry isn't a breeze either (think, doctors and lawyers).

So now the biggest thing to do is position yourself for one of these careers. You're in search of better financial incentives, but do not want to push for those additional skills (not trying to sound negative with that). As a result, your best pay options would probably come from Job category 3. The work will be difficult in numerous ways, whether that's physical or mental, but hopefully you won't have to use lots of certificates to get in the job.

I had an awful lot of friends in college who earned degrees in Automotive Technology and are doing well for themselves. Several of them turned wrenches for a bit, but most have worked their way onto management positions, sales, product testing, etc. Turning the wrench can be a very rewarding job, and for a lot of folks, it's a perfect existence that offers you upto side work, odd jobs, etc...If you're wanting to do something like that, just away from the dealership, then that's exactly what you should do. Get away from the dealership networks, find some independent automotive shops, be humble, but bring your certifications with you. Take the job that the independent shop has to offer, whether that be sweeping floors, emptying trash cans, or running to the dealership to acquire parts. But do that job to the absolute best of your ability, and welcome new responsibilities as they're handed to you. Remember your manners, be appreciative, and open to advice. No one hates a know-it-all more than someone that actually does know-it-all (aka, the guy who's been in the job for 20+ years).

From there, start building a resume, start networking. Even a fun job can suck at times if the $ is enough, I had a friend who built classics for several years and left because he wasn't getting paid enough. He started his own business delivering exercise equipment, after making a bit money doing that work he's back working in an autobody shop a good friend owns and isn't worried nearly as much about his financial situation.
i thought dealerships were the place to earn your stripes?
I see what your saying though about staying away from dealerships.

I do constanty get underpayed by them so your though.
I'll try some independant shops.

I'm thinking about going into IT,..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2013, 09:50 PM
 
4,762 posts, read 11,055,262 times
Reputation: 7847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
...Are there jobs that are in demand, pay decently and do not require too much training to get started?...

You will find that if you invest a lot of time, effort, and work into learning new things, you will be rewarded and in demand. (Other people who do not do that are a dime a dozen...)

Find out what skills the employers want. Skills which are in demand. Then go get some books and start reading.

Hint: Many auto mechanics are skilled at mechanical things, but lack knowledge of electronics and computers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2013, 09:50 PM
 
Location: The Valley of the Sun
1,481 posts, read 2,260,400 times
Reputation: 1530
Airline mechanics make a decent middle class wage but I think the schooling is expensive.

Or you could take your mechanical apptitude and be a mechanical engineer. Only thing is it requires a BS in a pretty gueling program packed with lots and lots of math and physics. But if your heart is into it 100% then you can do it. Plus mechanical engineers start off at $45k/yr and can easily pull in $80k/yr after a few years of experience is gained.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2013, 10:55 PM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,904,906 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_J View Post
You will find that if you invest a lot of time, effort, and work into learning new things, you will be rewarded and in demand. (Other people who do not do that are a dime a dozen...)

Find out what skills the employers want. Skills which are in demand. Then go get some books and start reading.

Hint: Many auto mechanics are skilled at mechanical things, but lack knowledge of electronics and computers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottay View Post
Airline mechanics make a decent middle class wage but I think the schooling is expensive.

Or you could take your mechanical apptitude and be a mechanical engineer. Only thing is it requires a BS in a pretty gueling program packed with lots and lots of math and physics. But if your heart is into it 100% then you can do it. Plus mechanical engineers start off at $45k/yr and can easily pull in $80k/yr after a few years of experience is gained.
Thanks for the input. I'm already going to college for electrical engineering. I was looking for a career that I could change into right now. Maybe within a years time or so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2013, 01:41 AM
 
3,185 posts, read 5,781,900 times
Reputation: 1818
Yo....Why not go for the wild side and become a marine mechanic . You pick the resort area marina to live as a bonus to the big money yuppys will pay for you to keep their floating toys running.. You got to show some hustle and look sharp for all the hot young women you will see all the time too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2013, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,088 posts, read 7,733,408 times
Reputation: 6650
Go work for Goodyear or similar. Enter one of the management positions- Sales or Service and work up from there. Goodyear has a good retirement. I presume the others are the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2013, 06:53 AM
 
4,445 posts, read 7,185,715 times
Reputation: 13340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veyron View Post
I'm thinking about going into IT,..
FWIW, I went from IT to mechanic (motorcycle, supposedly my "dream" career) only to become so disappointed and burnt out in about 2 years that I switched back to IT. No formal schooling or degrees in IT, but I had practical experience after ~20 years and was able to land jobs like head of the IT dept making money that was top 10% of the area I was living.

Entry into IT is pretty annoying though, you'd be answering tech-support phones for a year or two. Stupidly simple, it's the bottom rung on the chain, lots of burn-out. I found 3rd shift to be the easiest to deal with as there are fewer calls, no management hounding you, etc... Been a long time, but I think I made a couple bucks over minimum.

I thought that the systems-oriented troubleshooting that's needed for IT work transferred to being a mechanic surprisingly well. Wrenching is Easy work for me, and I take delight in doing electrical troubleshooting (I fixed a vehicle in school that hadn't run in several years of students trying, and making things worse). Maybe you'll find the same is true in reverse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2013, 07:20 AM
 
2,632 posts, read 5,904,906 times
Reputation: 1399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian_M View Post
FWIW, I went from IT to mechanic (motorcycle, supposedly my "dream" career) only to become so disappointed and burnt out in about 2 years that I switched back to IT. No formal schooling or degrees in IT, but I had practical experience after ~20 years and was able to land jobs like head of the IT dept making money that was top 10% of the area I was living.

Entry into IT is pretty annoying though, you'd be answering tech-support phones for a year or two. Stupidly simple, it's the bottom rung on the chain, lots of burn-out. I found 3rd shift to be the easiest to deal with as there are fewer calls, no management hounding you, etc... Been a long time, but I think I made a couple bucks over minimum.

I thought that the systems-oriented troubleshooting that's needed for IT work transferred to being a mechanic surprisingly well. Wrenching is Easy work for me, and I take delight in doing electrical troubleshooting (I fixed a vehicle in school that hadn't run in several years of students trying, and making things worse). Maybe you'll find the same is true in reverse.
I'm in the same exact situation. After 2 years I have had enough as working as an automotive technician for someone else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top