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Old 06-02-2014, 07:30 PM
 
2,775 posts, read 2,577,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skel1977 View Post
Im talking specifically about using synthetic oil. Just a curious question. I know the regular oil they tell you to change it at 3k miles but im pretty sure its ok to go to 4 or even 5k miles, yes?

SO im wondering about synthetic oil in my 2012 corolla and how many miles is "safe" to go over without changing it
You could change 100% synthetic oil at 6-9k miles and not have a problem (synthetic blends and regular dino oil at less mileage). This information is all over the Internet... mechanics, respected engineers, they all say the same thing. There are a lot of factors to consider, but the truth is that the oil change idiot lights serve the oil industry more than us consumers and the idea that you need to change your oil every 3k miles is completely out-dated. Make sure your oil level is maintained and check it for color as well... if there's a problem, you will see it and that's when you change it early.

Honestly folks, how many of you have actually run a car engine into the ground? In the past 25 years I haven't seen an engine die from oil issues; instead my friends, family, and I have all replaced old cars which either had catastrophic failures due to accidents or electrical or non-engine mechanical repair bills that were so high we decided to bail for a newer vehicle.
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:39 PM
 
1,137 posts, read 1,758,866 times
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I was taught that "they" make money if we change oil every 3,000 -- but I was taught it's fine to go to 5,000.

Just today I got a new set of tires at Costco and they said they'd last 90,000 miles as long as I had them rotated every 5,000 mi. So, I thought: okay, I'll get my oil changed with my favorite guy and then take my van to Costco for a free rotation. Easy way to remember.

Alley
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:45 PM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,489,492 times
Reputation: 3217
Quote:
Originally Posted by skel1977 View Post
Im talking specifically about using synthetic oil. Just a curious question. I know the regular oil they tell you to change it at 3k miles but im pretty sure its ok to go to 4 or even 5k miles, yes?

SO im wondering about synthetic oil in my 2012 corolla and how many miles is "safe" to go over without changing it
Why does it matter? Go for 3,000 miles and be done with it, unless your oil looks about the same color at 3,000 miles as it does coming out of the bottle. Use the oil that the manufacturer recommends... but figure that the manufacturer has a certain perverse incentive to stretch the oil change interval because, if your engine dies, you'll buy another car... hopefully another one of theirs.

I knew a mechanic with a 1990 Chevy truck that had over 300,000 miles on the original engine. He said the secret was keeping on top of the maintenance - he said he changes his oil every 2,000 miles.

If your oil comes out looking like new oil or close to it, you can go a bit longer between oil changes. If it comes out looking the color of root beer, that's about the right life for the oil. If it comes out the color of Guinness, shorten your oil change interval.

However, you can't "over-change" your oil. The worst that can happen is that you will reach a point of diminishing returns where you spend more money on oil changes than you save on late-stage engine maintenance.

The reason why oil goes bad is largely because the oil gobbles up sludge from inside your engine - sludge that is corrosive and damaging. It can only gobble so much before it starts losing its lubricity and its sludge-gobbling capability. You want to keep it in good enough condition to maintain the cleanliness of your engine.
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,633 posts, read 8,654,691 times
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Is it safe to start using synthetic oil in older engines (80K)? I remember reading somewhere that older engines with looser clearances don't like synthetics. On the flip side, is there any reason to change horses mid race at all?
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:55 PM
 
2,775 posts, read 2,577,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
Is it safe to start using synthetic oil in older engines (80K)? I remember reading somewhere that older engines with looser clearances don't like synthetics. On the flip side, is there any reason to change horses mid race at all?
The OP's 2012 Corolla does not have an old engine by anyone's standards (your car at 80k may or may not be a lot older - you haven't said - I'd say most anything in 2000s is pretty modern and would do well with synthetic). For the Corolla, yes, change to 100% synthetic (it is superior to regular oil) and increase the oil change interval accordingly, checking occasionally to make sure oil level and color is fine. The engine will likely last as long as they want the car. This information is substantiated in many places online.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,019 posts, read 7,053,519 times
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Much depends on the driving conditions. That's why many cars now have a gauge that tells you what your oil life is and when to change.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
27,994 posts, read 46,352,092 times
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Ford dealership told me it's Ok to change my oil every 5000 miles on my Ford Escape.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:55 PM
 
9,815 posts, read 13,883,984 times
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15 000 miles on 25 000 miles guaranteed Amsoil.
Wife's 99 RX300 I routinely do 12 000 miles. Very tight engine, does not burn oil at all. As in - Amsoil.
I think, manual calls for 5 000 miles, but that's for conventional oil. WE already put 110 000 miles onto that engine.
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Old 06-02-2014, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Southern Arizona
9,308 posts, read 25,652,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skel1977 View Post
Im talking specifically about using synthetic oil. Just a curious question. I know the regular oil they tell you to change it at 3k miles but im pretty sure its ok to go to 4 or even 5k miles, yes?

SO im wondering about synthetic oil in my 2012 corolla and how many miles is "safe" to go over without changing it
Just curious, Skel . . . WHY would you even ask?

The cost of an Oil Change / Service is literally "chump change" compared to even the most basic engine problems so why would anyone not adhere to the Owner's Manual Recommendations?
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Old 06-02-2014, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,586 posts, read 11,831,318 times
Reputation: 10545
Quote:
m talking specifically about using synthetic oil.
Lets chat synthetic oils for a moment. A lot of folks think that it's a wonder fluid created in a lab- that's completely wrong. Most all of the "synthetic" oils you buy today are made from crude oil just like conventional oil. At one time we had a lot of GTL oil (gas to liquid) that were a real advancement over any conventional oil. But most of those are gone as the ethylene gas that was used to make them has become hard to find and expensive. Years ago, if you remember, Castrol and Mobil got into a lawsuit with Mobil claiming that the Castrol Gp III base was not a synthetic but it was decided that because the fluid did not appear in nature that it was a synthetic. Well some of the folks are now pushing that definition and yesterdays conventional oils are now todays "synthetics". These are the severly hydrocracked base oils. Even a lowly Gp II base in some products will be listed as a synthetic. That leaves the Gp I solvent refined base oils as the only conventional oil out there. Most of the finished synthetic oils are a Gp III base oil and some have a splash of ultra high VI PAO base fluid in the mix. So if you think the word "synthetic" is buying you something, you'd be mostly wrong. BUT, and you knew there had to be one, most of the blends have a considerable amount of the Gp III or Gp II+ base oil in the formulation. Going back to the advent of the Ford recommended 5w-20 oils, they exceeded the limits of API by demanding that the oils not shift out of its respective viscosity range, have far few high heat deposits, and is tested at 304F for 16 hours instead of the API 8 hours. The only way to hit the mark is with at least some of the base oil to be a synthetic Gp II+ or Gp III. So in analysis, the blends have the best of both the conventional oils and synthetic oils. And yes, both have advantages over the other. Conventional oils support the additive package while synthetics do not. Normally a mineral oil is used to bind the additive package to the synthetic base oil. Conventional oils naturally cling to parts while synthetics do not. Usually a tackifier of some kind is used to make the oil stay on the parts while the engine is not running. Otherwise the oil runs off of the parts and leaves them open for corrosion. Synthetics have a much stronger film strength, some so strong that they have to be cut with additives otherwise the additive package can't get in to do its job and wear is increased. Synthetics normally have better cold flow characteristics but Viscosity Index Improvers can make a conventional oil flow almost as good. Syntheitcs, having a higher VI can make a wider viscosity spread than a conventional without the help of sludge causing polymers. Polymers are the "things" that caused the sludge issues back in the 1990's with the 10w-40 specs. Any additive package that yields a gain or reduces friction can be made in a conventional base or synthetic base and yield the identical results. So if you're thinking a syntheitc oil brings a lot more to the game, you need to research a lot more and not at some forum. Real research at places that actually certify Tribologists.
So how did we end up ith the oils we have today? ILSAC is an organization of all of the auto makers in the USA and that includes the Japanese, Germans, etc. They set up the criteria for all oils to be used and that includes any limits concerning additives like ZDDP. ZDDP is bad for the emissions system should it gas. Conditions like an engine that doesn't see too many full temp runs that accumulates condensation is a good example of an engine that will gas the ZDDP. API is the administrator of the specs. Then you have car makers that have decided to go above ILSAC and API that makes their own specs like Ford, GMs Dexos, Honda, Toyota with it's ridiculous 0w-30 oil spec. Most of these have no actual value, just makes the service dept a little more money by recommending/threatening the use of their own branded oils.
So now you have a slight clue when you ask about synthetic oils. At one time there was a huge difference. Today the line is so blurry that in many cases the cheaper oils produce lower wear metals and are a much better value. So how long can you run a synthetic oil? What does it say in your owners manual? Many engines respond well to syntheitc oils, some don't respond well at all. The GM 3.1 V6 comes to mind that does not like synthetic oil. So the limit is the owners manual. But kindly remember, we are not driving yer grand dads Buick anymore. We have much cleaner burning engines that just don't make the contaminants of yesterday. We have cleaner burning gas, lean burn technology, etc that means we can go farther on the same oils. The days of a 3000 mile change in a modern engine are long gone. Even most 10 year old engines can easily go 5000 miles between changes.
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