U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 12-25-2007, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
31 posts, read 136,572 times
Reputation: 47

Advertisements

Believe it or not the best fix I've ever seen was removing the sagging fabric altogether.

I removed the headliner and peeled the nasty velour crap off. Then we painted the styrofoam backing with Fleckstone spray paint (it's urethane so it doesn't eat the foam). I picked a grey that went with the interior color.

It was amazing how many compliments I got on that headliner! Nobody could tell it wasn't the OEM unit.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-27-2007, 08:04 AM
 
289 posts, read 1,375,754 times
Reputation: 118
Spray on adhesive isn't bad if you have a spare set of hands to stretch the fabric.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2009, 02:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 25,714 times
Reputation: 10
Buying the foam backed material and applying it with furniture fabric glue is the right way to go if you have such inclination.

A fast/cheap fix for my Geo Metro was a $12 rug at Walmart of the same color and two tubes of liquid nails, construction grade. I used a wirewheel to remove the foam from the cardboard is very stiff and coated with some kind of metallic liner.

Using the Liquid Nails I made lines round and round the middle then pressed the run into place and weighted it with books. Working my way outward I continued to add glue and books. When I got to the curved part of the edge I went ahead and cut off the unneeded portion of the rug leaving a couple inches of waste to trim away after the glue completely dried. I used 4 continuous lines around the edge to seal it there and clamped it with C-Clamps over foot long pieces of wood to clamp the sealed edge tight.

After 3 days I trimmed the waste edge away and cutout the holes for screws and stuff like visor and mirror. Putting it back was a snap and it insulated the car much better than the original liner. Looked better too.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2012, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,227 posts, read 20,280,133 times
Reputation: 2209
Not trying to revive a dead thread but thought I'd ask....since I'm in the same boat.

My 91 S-10's headliner is/was sagging, and to make matters worse, the styrofoam backing was cracked in several areas.

Now my truck is a beater truck but I do want to make it look a little better on the inside than it does now. I'd like to do it on a budget as much as possible.

I've wondered what my options are. Maybe a piece of carpet the size of the headliner? Has anyone tried carpet for a headliner?

Or can styrofoam be repaired once cracked?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2012, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 22,963,452 times
Reputation: 7957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
Not trying to revive a dead thread but thought I'd ask....since I'm in the same boat.

My 91 S-10's headliner is/was sagging, and to make matters worse, the styrofoam backing was cracked in several areas.

Now my truck is a beater truck but I do want to make it look a little better on the inside than it does now. I'd like to do it on a budget as much as possible.

I've wondered what my options are. Maybe a piece of carpet the size of the headliner? Has anyone tried carpet for a headliner?

Or can styrofoam be repaired once cracked?
Start off by getting estimates from upolstery shops. You may find you can afford their prices. It's not as expensive as some people think. They can do a better job faster with the correct materials. If you're determined not to bother with the pros, don't just rip it all out and don't do carpet. You need to get some form of insulation to cut and glue to the inside roof of the truck to prevent your brain from cooking. Try to use liner material that at least resembles your seats' color.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 06:53 AM
 
9,290 posts, read 11,138,237 times
Reputation: 12464
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01Snake View Post
Thumbtacks

or staples....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 06:56 AM
 
9,290 posts, read 11,138,237 times
Reputation: 12464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
Not trying to revive a dead thread but thought I'd ask....since I'm in the same boat.

My 91 S-10's headliner is/was sagging, and to make matters worse, the styrofoam backing was cracked in several areas.

Now my truck is a beater truck but I do want to make it look a little better on the inside than it does now. I'd like to do it on a budget as much as possible.

I've wondered what my options are. Maybe a piece of carpet the size of the headliner? Has anyone tried carpet for a headliner?

Or can styrofoam be repaired once cracked?

I had a headliner replaced in an 89 GMC S15 (same as S10) for about $100 back in the mid 90's. If you remove it yourself and drop it off at the shop it may save you a few bucks. Remove the visors and then it is a couple sheetmetal screws and the headliner drops down.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 07:10 AM
 
8,402 posts, read 19,527,792 times
Reputation: 6764
I agree with all that's been posted. The only thing I'd add is that if you DIY, get the good spray adhesive. There are a couple 3M products that work well, but few others.

At the last car audio place I worked we had a guy that did all types of interior repairs. He'd come around weekly to drum up business, then do the repairs while the installers did their work. I watched him do a couple headliners. It's simple if tedious work. Just like when painting a car, the prep makes all the difference. Gotta get EVERY bit of the old headliner off the shell, or it will create a lump in the new headliner.

Unbacked carpet, like what is used to cover speaker boxes in car audio, may be a good option. It's stretchy, forgiving, inexpensive, and easier to work with than headliner foam.

Last edited by vmaxnc; 05-14-2012 at 07:23 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,227 posts, read 20,280,133 times
Reputation: 2209
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
You need to get some form of insulation to cut and glue to the inside roof of the truck to prevent your brain from cooking.
Thanks. Most shops I think are going to want upwards of $70 or better. More than I want to spend. One thing though I did notice some black square looking pieces of materiel stuck to the underside of the roof skin...I suppose these are supposed to absorb heat?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2012, 01:40 PM
 
8,402 posts, read 19,527,792 times
Reputation: 6764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
Thanks. Most shops I think are going to want upwards of $70 or better. More than I want to spend. One thing though I did notice some black square looking pieces of materiel stuck to the underside of the roof skin...I suppose these are supposed to absorb heat?
Could be, but I bet they are there to dampen oscillation of a large steel panel. Same thing Dynamat does.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top