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Old 11-15-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: San Diego A.K.A "D.A.Y.G.O City"
1,949 posts, read 3,680,837 times
Reputation: 2546

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Is it me? Or do you guys notice less and less younger people driving around in classics? Because at times I feel like I am the only person that's under 35 in my neighborhood that owns old cars.

I can't put my finger on it. I guess the appeal is there, but maybe it's possibly that young people just don't know how to work and diagnose old carbureted engines, therefore, they're afraid of them so they don't bother to own one, that or want to deal with old car problems. I know I have a difficult time trying to figure out what is wrong with my old cars, but that's a great challenge I learn from. It's how you grow and gain the knowledge to keep at it. Plus I have the passion for them, this is what separates a hardcore enthusiast from the so so hobbyist and car flippers that just like to look at them, but never to actually do any wrenching.

None of my parents owned any cool old cars, it was mostly junk from the 80's ( no offense ), so I honestly don't know where the passion for loving the old stuff came from. My grandfather that I never met on my mothers side was a mechanic for years, and he was always out in the back in the garage working on his cars, tearing down engines, doing body work, pretty much anything and everything you could think of, my grandfather could fix, he even worked on Jaguars and Mercedes cars from the 50's and 60's which he always disliked because of there complexity. He was also self taught, and learned from just reading shop manuals.

So maybe it runs in the family.


When I was 19 or 20 I fell in love with big old Caddy's for some reason. I mean I was always into Lowriders as a kid, that always fascinated me. Going to car shows at 13 years old was what did it. I guess part of the reason that I've always been into classics is because mainly how much character and great styling the old cars provides. Also the presence they command and knowing that you're not like everybody else driving the boring, and stale modern car that nobody notices.

Any time I see something old and cool on the road it brightens up my day, seriously. I could be in a bad mood or having a rough day when something bad ass rolls on by and it completely makes my day a little bit better.

I wish more younger people were into what I'm into, many don't understand, or even care. All my friends think I'm crazy for owning old Caddys and Lincolns. It's hard to relate to them at times because they don't get it. They think there cool in all, but to own one, they rather just check em out at a car show instead.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:01 PM
 
15,401 posts, read 13,409,934 times
Reputation: 20882
The reason is a lot of them are very expensive.

Even two decades ago, a person could find a 1969 mustang, 67 camaro, 70, chevelle, is not too bad condition for a good price. Sure, these were not the 428cj, z28, or ss, but still a great base car.

Now days, an affordable one needs thousands of dollars in resto just to get it streetable, and any that are in good condition demand a high price. The most desirable ones, mainly those coming with a v8 plus the special edition stuff, command a very high price.

Eventually the generation gap thing happens, where the new generation does not have a link at all with these cars; they have always been out of reach for them financially, they just view them as they do a Maserati or something, nice but unaffordable.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:08 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX USA
5,159 posts, read 9,669,921 times
Reputation: 7949
A lot of younger people arnt in to cars much period, let alone classic ones. Add that to the fact, that the prices of these cars skyrocked in the past 10-15 years, younger people don't have the disposible income to spend on these cars. I would love to be driving around in a late 60's Mustang, or a mid 50's merc, they just are not in reach.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,460,557 times
Reputation: 9216
I am a lot older than you and I dislike most old American cars. Some people think all old cars are classics. I don't. Just because my father in law like Buick Roadmasters doesn't mean they were really special.

I like:

Old Lincoln Continentals
C2 Corvettes
Gen 1 Trans Am (but dislike every generation after)
Mustangs, Shelbys
Cobras
T-birds
A few old "fin" cars like Cadillacs

Magnificent classics:

Jaguar E-type
Miura
Older Ferraris
Mercedes W123
BMW 2002
BMW 635CSI
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Hickory, NC
1,140 posts, read 1,005,380 times
Reputation: 1565
Depends on what kind of classics you're talking about. I enjoy muscle cars and sports cars from the 60s and early 70s, but I don't really care about anything before then. I can appreciate the pre 60s cars for what they are, and enjoy looking at them at car shows and whatnot, but I have zero desire to own one. If someone gave me a 50s Chevy or a 20s Ford, I'd sell it and get something I actually like.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:38 PM
 
10,092 posts, read 12,151,050 times
Reputation: 13762
Kids aren't into cars, boats, motorcycles etc. compared to even 20 years ago. I have 20-30 yr old employees and they think a Kia/Honda type car is perfect. I have had dozens of young male employees over the years and not one had a Camaro/Mustang/performance car. The cost of ownership (fuel,insurance,cost to buy is too high) yet they have game box systems/expensive phones etc.....so I guess it boils down to priorities.

That being said, I have never owned a car older than I am and rarely own anything more than 8 years old or so. I like Harleys but really don't need to spend 18-20K on something to sit in the garage for 350 days a year so I am guilty of the same mentality to a point.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,848 posts, read 7,641,615 times
Reputation: 11957
What is a classic? To me it is a 1949 Mercury. 1957 Chevy. A 1961 MGA. A 1964 Olds 442.
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Prosper
6,268 posts, read 12,837,427 times
Reputation: 9367
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
The reason is a lot of them are very expensive.

Even two decades ago, a person could find a 1969 mustang, 67 camaro, 70, chevelle, is not too bad condition for a good price. Sure, these were not the 428cj, z28, or ss, but still a great base car.

Now days, an affordable one needs thousands of dollars in resto just to get it streetable, and any that are in good condition demand a high price. The most desirable ones, mainly those coming with a v8 plus the special edition stuff, command a very high price.

Eventually the generation gap thing happens, where the new generation does not have a link at all with these cars; they have always been out of reach for them financially, they just view them as they do a Maserati or something, nice but unaffordable.
Autotraderclassics.com currently has 4 1969 Mustangs, all with V8's, under $13,000. 3 of those have less than 80k on them, the other one says true miles are unknown. V6's are even cheaper.

So, the problem is not affordability for older cars, it's lack of desire. Kids today want a car (those kids that even care about cars) that can play their songs through bluetooth, that has all power features, and all the latest options.

Their parents want them to have airbags, and antilock brakes, and have good reliability and a warranty.

Classics cars have none of those things, and without even the lure of nostalgia for a kid today... Why would they even look for a classic car?

What's classic to them is going to be late 80's/90's cars.
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:16 PM
 
4,232 posts, read 6,029,312 times
Reputation: 10064
It's an expensive and time consuming hobby and boomers just won't die off or retire like they need to.
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
14,553 posts, read 9,622,856 times
Reputation: 12098
I second the view that the young aren’t into cars much. Looks like the boring side won and convinced them that a car is just for transportation. It is not just cars. I ride motorcycles and one of my wife's fears was that the boys could not resist riding it and would hurt themselves. Let me tell you something. If that 800lb hunk of steel disappeared from the garage they would not notice. Not once did they expresso any desire to ride it. I don’t know what it is but something has died inside boys.
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