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Old 11-16-2014, 04:40 PM
 
576 posts, read 453,595 times
Reputation: 893

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I've noticed Japanese mini trucks seem to go forever. Maybe they are built a bit stronger than cars. Fuel injection has helped make engines last longer. I watched a mechanic on TV explain this. Something about being cleaner than carburetors and the engine gets less crap in it. Engines used to need all kinds of stuff at 100.000 miles. Now that is like nothing. I recommend changing tranny fluid more often. Specially if you tow anything. Transmissions are like crazy expensive. Oil is cheap,considering.
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Old 11-16-2014, 06:23 PM
 
741 posts, read 685,015 times
Reputation: 1356
Buying these cars is a risk.

The payoff is that you get a good one and wind up with many trouble-free miles of service for sometimes what might be a very small sum of money. My brother drove the same 1990's Civic to the point that his boss demanded he get something else since he was parking a car in the executive lot that looked like a Beirut taxi. He paid $1500 for it and drove it for 9 years without making a *single* repair. His frugality is legendary in our family but its hard to laugh at him. He figures he pocketed $30K over the years because of that car and not having to make a payment... and he STILL drives it, just not to work.

The flip side is exactly as the guy on the first page mentioned. When the car does have a major failure, well, dems the breaks and now, you need to shell out $2K to put into a car you just paid $2K for that will still only be worth $2K once its fixed.

For people who know how to repair cars and don't have a lot of money, these cars can be fantastic. For people who don't work on cars and don't have a lot of money, they're a real gamble. You might win, you might lose. Everyone who has a Corolla that goes to 300K will tell you about it but nobody tells stories about the hundreds of that same model that went to the boneyard between 130K-200K because of a major failure.

If you do decide to buy an older, high mileage car, have a good relationship with a mechanic and be prepared to cut your losses should a major repair (transmission, blown engine, frame failure) jump out at you.
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Old 11-16-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: New Mexico via Ohio via Indiana
1,436 posts, read 1,192,037 times
Reputation: 2279
125K, in 2014, is NOTHING. Of course some cars, like Camrys and Accords have higher resale, but if it's been built in the last ten years, any coupe or sedan should do you fine.
Can't go wrong with a Nissan, Toyota, or Honda in this category.
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Old 11-16-2014, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,245 posts, read 3,420,269 times
Reputation: 8792
I have a 1988 Chevy Blazer with 242K miles on it. It runs fine.

I paid $1200 for it and have had to put approximately $2000 into it. I have a mechanic that I trust, take it to him for oil changes every 5000 miles, and take it to him for any small problems or things that I feel need fixing. I also have a set schedule of maintenance that I keep carefully.

My philosophy is that any car is going to cost a certain amount per month. No vehicle will hold its value relative to its up-front cost. NONE. Classic cars that are desirable take money to maintain. New, nice cars, will depreciate quickly. My Blazer so far is costing me about $160 a month, dividing how long I've owned it by how much repair money I've had to put in, but that goes down every month it doesn't have an issue. The previous owner let some things on it go; I had to fix those things and my hope is that it lasts at least another ~2 years, 25,000 miles with only normal maintenance or minor to moderate repairs. If so I will consider it a very good purchase.

I bought my previous car brand-new. I paid it off last year and still own it. It still runs fine at 97K miles although aesthetically it's got its bumps and bruises. My opinion on old cars changed when I actually put pen to paper on how much I spent though financing it. Never again will I finance a new car -- you might as well just wrap 20% of the car's retail price in a bow and hand it over to the bank - that's how much more you're paying than it's worth.

$5000 will put a new engine in an old car. You can make an old car pretty much new for all intents and purposes for about $12,000, providing it is not rusted. That's half the sticker price of an average new car. The biggest issue with an older car imo is rust and wear and tear on its skeleton. Engines, transmissions... those can be fixed. The body, once rusted, can't be.
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Old 11-16-2014, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,101 posts, read 7,108,271 times
Reputation: 13611
You can get a bargain if you buy a Buick LeSabre. They have an excellent reputation for longevity. I have a 2005 with leather, power and heated seats and other stuff. You can still find these with 100,000 miles in very good shape for like $5000. Everything works still on mine, which has 140.000 and still runs like the day I bought it, at 70,000. I'd never buy a new vehicle anymore. I just choke when I see the stickers on the new ones, and then read reviews on Edmunds.
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Old 11-17-2014, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
305 posts, read 283,750 times
Reputation: 243
I had plenty of cars with over 125k with no problems. I had a 99 Tacoma 4cy with 200k, that thing was a tank! 2001 Tacoma prerunner 6cyl, with 185k, ran perfect! I wish I never sold it. 1997 Camry with 180k, ran strong. I would still have it now but got into accident. 1997 Maxima with 200k, solid car but also got into accident. I have a 2008 Tundra 5.7l now and plan to keep it for a long time. I also have 07 subaru wrx with 178k now, runs great! Along with many others in our family.
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Old 11-17-2014, 01:41 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,904 posts, read 37,631,162 times
Reputation: 20990
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapie9969 View Post
I've noticed Japanese mini trucks seem to go forever. Maybe they are built a bit stronger than cars. ....
Diesel HiLux seems to WORK around the world (Except USA)

No need to buy fuel... just top off with veggie oil. (or coconut / palm / waste cooking / used engine oil...)
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Old 11-17-2014, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
9,493 posts, read 5,255,932 times
Reputation: 14274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaba View Post
Buying these cars is a risk.

The payoff is that you get a good one and wind up with many trouble-free miles of service for sometimes what might be a very small sum of money. My brother drove the same 1990's Civic to the point that his boss demanded he get something else since he was parking a car in the executive lot that looked like a Beirut taxi. He paid $1500 for it and drove it for 9 years without making a *single* repair. His frugality is legendary in our family but its hard to laugh at him. He figures he pocketed $30K over the years because of that car and not having to make a payment... and he STILL drives it, just not to work.

The flip side is exactly as the guy on the first page mentioned. When the car does have a major failure, well, dems the breaks and now, you need to shell out $2K to put into a car you just paid $2K for that will still only be worth $2K once its fixed.

For people who know how to repair cars and don't have a lot of money, these cars can be fantastic. For people who don't work on cars and don't have a lot of money, they're a real gamble. You might win, you might lose. Everyone who has a Corolla that goes to 300K will tell you about it but nobody tells stories about the hundreds of that same model that went to the boneyard between 130K-200K because of a major failure.

If you do decide to buy an older, high mileage car, have a good relationship with a mechanic and be prepared to cut your losses should a major repair (transmission, blown engine, frame failure) jump out at you.

Yeah I agree that threads like this just scream for people to post their success stories. But like we both have posted 200,000 + on any car or truck is rare with the possible exception of a Toyota truck. That's why I felt it helpful to post my entire car/truck history, it kind of tells a better story than one or two individual cars/trucks.

I stand by my assessment that 125,000 is not that big of a deal but by the time you get to 180,000 or so you should be prepared to find another vehicle in most cases. There should also be no question by not that your best chance at long life success is with a popular Japanese car/truck
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Old 11-17-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Currently living in Reddit
5,655 posts, read 5,480,890 times
Reputation: 7260
Quote:
Originally Posted by gg View Post
A lot depends on the owner of the vehicle. My last car is owned by a friend and it has over 200K miles on it and drives like new. My car an Audi A4 has 125K on it and drives and looks like new. I take great care of my cars. I expect cars to last over 200K without much repair work needed. I will probably buy another Audi, since I just love to have a 6 speed manual transmission AWD car that gets over 30mpg and handles like a dream. I don't think brand is as important as owner, but some cars are questionable. All my cars have a manual transmission because they are easier on the car if the driver knows what they are doing. Automatics are more problematic, but 95% of the cars in the US are autos, so it is hard to find a manual here. The US isn't a driving type country, it is more of a floating living room type country, so most want cup holders a big SUV and big seats to accommodate being overweight.
I've preferred manual for decades, but gotta say, I'm getting sick of driving a manual in Pittsburgh. GG, I know FC has lots of hills, but here in S. Hills, those hills are often sites for long traffic backups. I drive a 2009 Jeep Patriot POS model and try not to ride the clutch, but it can be near impossible to not do so at times waiting at uphill lights with the guy behind you right on your bumper. I've smelled it burning up a few times.

Prior to the Jeep POS I had a sweet 93 Saab 9000, bought with 87K in 1999. Drove that till it had ~225K. Suspension was going, so traded it in during "cash for clunkers" for the Jeep, needing more space for our catering biz. I hate all the plastic. Especially all the loose parts that have materialized over past 5 years. I've already spent more on the Jeep per year - under warranty - than I did on first 5 years with the Saab.
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Old 11-17-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Pikesville, MD
5,229 posts, read 11,528,289 times
Reputation: 4846
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Engines, transmissions... those can be fixed. The body, once rusted, can't be.
Sure they can. I've done it many times on older rusted cars, and am doing it now on my '63 Comet that has rust in the floors and around the rear wheelwells. Fixing the rust for me is cheaper than replacing the engine is going to be.

Heres another example of a rusty shell that I fixed in my garage:

















I only had $2500 into that car after paying only $100 for it and driving it home in the condition of the first picture.

As for the original question, I'm looking at a BMW 750iL right now that has 125k on it. I figure I can get another decade of use out of it easily, since my last one was still in perfect shape at 185k miles, and we got 250k miles out of an '02 BMW 325i with no real difficulty before selling it on to a happy new owner.
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