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Old 11-25-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
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I've heard a lot of stories about NASCAR banning a lot of engine, and aerodynamics technologies in the late 60s, and early 70s. Do you think that slowed the development of technology in production cars, or did American car companies develop technology in other motor sport venues?
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Old 11-25-2014, 03:28 PM
 
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nascar did ban a lot of things in the 60s, but the automakers did use other racing outlets, like trans am for instance to develop technology. ford did a lot of international racing in a variety of classes, as did GM.
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Old 11-25-2014, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Prosper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topher5150 View Post
I've heard a lot of stories about NASCAR banning a lot of engine, and aerodynamics technologies in the late 60s, and early 70s. Do you think that slowed the development of technology in production cars, or did American car companies develop technology in other motor sport venues?
Racing improves the breed. Any time a technology is banned in racing, it is bad for mass production vehicles IMO.

The reasons why technology gets banned in racing applications is because it can offer an "unfair" advantage, or drastically improve upon the cars as to make other vehicles obsolete, and thus, uncompetitive. It's not racing if just one team with a great idea decimates all the other cars, so obviously, it can be bad for the sport.

But, the reasons why new tech sometimes gets banned in racing is exactly the reason why it should be implemented in passenger cars, usually for making the car much safer to drive in a lot of cases, or more fuel efficient, or lighter yet stronger.
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Old 11-25-2014, 10:12 PM
 
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I'd say the 'bans' in the late 90's/early 2000's did more harm..

NASCAR sticking with carbs.. Leaded fuel.

Alot of tech investment the teams could have made if they were on the forefront of that technology. I think it was 2010 or so when they went to unleaded fuel, then about 2012 when they went to an ethanol blend. Right in that timeframe is when they went to EFI as well.. Something that had been standard on passenger cars for well over 20 years.

The only thing NASCAR pioneers now is safety. Back in the 60's, they were on the forefront of many technologies, due to the wars between the manufacturers. Ford, Chrysler and chevrolet were all trying to outdo each other.. Bigger engines, better aero. Now with all the cars basically being the same..
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Old 11-26-2014, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Eastern Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
I'd say the 'bans' in the late 90's/early 2000's did more harm..

NASCAR sticking with carbs.. Leaded fuel.

Alot of tech investment the teams could have made if they were on the forefront of that technology. I think it was 2010 or so when they went to unleaded fuel, then about 2012 when they went to an ethanol blend. Right in that timeframe is when they went to EFI as well.. Something that had been standard on passenger cars for well over 20 years.

The only thing NASCAR pioneers now is safety. Back in the 60's, they were on the forefront of many technologies, due to the wars between the manufacturers. Ford, Chrysler and chevrolet were all trying to outdo each other.. Bigger engines, better aero. Now with all the cars basically being the same..

Without a doubt politics in Nascar behind the scenes made rules that hurt the development of many types of engines that could have went into production vehicles as well. Limiting of low budget teams, such as the not allowing of the Grand Am of Herb Adams in 73 over a "supposed" unapproved ball joint (later it was found out that a few gm board members that wanted only the over rated chevy in nascar and no other division bent nascar officals ear to ban Pontiac and ultimately Olds from nascar) then after it was too late to qualify, they got an "Oh, yeah, that ball joint is approved". The next race it was something else and so on all year until Herb went Trans Am racing. How about the Superbird and Daytona bans because chevy cried bloody murder? Yet those cars with that wing and nose were the best ever in the wind tunnel and at speed, with VERY few of them wrecking on the track.
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Old 11-26-2014, 01:35 PM
 
Location: East TX
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Slowing of technology in one area generally leads to developments in another. When aerodynamics have been the focus of restrictions, we see the engineers attack the powertrain and the mechanical aspect. When mechanical limits are imposed, aerodynamic development has moved ahead. Tires, fuel, weight, and many obscure little developments have continued to move the sport/industry forward.

Example is 1999 when the CART governing body took away aero downforce to "slow" the cars, engineers worked on power improvements and developed additional speed through better engine technology. NASCAR had similar times. I would suspect that if you followed the development process carefully through those years, there were still advances made, maybe just not quite as quickly as if they had been unencumbered.
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
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No tech ban has seemed to stop the #48 team from using traction control.

Kidding!
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:18 PM
 
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You would think that an area that would be almost bulletproof by now would be valve springs.

You look at engine failures in NASCAR.. Very, very rarely does anything in the lower end of the motor fail. But valve springs? Seems like a failure per race.. Admittedly, they are turning dang near 10k RPM.. But.. Seems every race you hear of someone down a cylinder, and that's almost always due to a valve spring failure.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:45 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
You would think that an area that would be almost bulletproof by now would be valve springs.

You look at engine failures in NASCAR.. Very, very rarely does anything in the lower end of the motor fail. But valve springs? Seems like a failure per race.. Admittedly, they are turning dang near 10k RPM.. But.. Seems every race you hear of someone down a cylinder, and that's almost always due to a valve spring failure.
That's why multi valve cylinder heads are much better for racing. Small valves don't need huge valve springs to keep valves from floating.

It's time for NASCAR to go with OHC multi valve cylinder heads and as soon as GM has a V-8 like that Rick and Brian will change engine rules.
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Old 12-02-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
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hmmmm sounds like a lot of hang up on GM's part.
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