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Old 12-06-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,557,510 times
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I general inflate the summer tires about 5 lbs. over the recommendation and the winter snow tires (on all wheels) at or sometimes a bit under if I am not going to drive much over 50 mph. I do this to improve handling in the summer and traction on packed snow in the winter.

The most important thing to do is check your tire pressure about once a month. When I started driving some 55 years ago I checked them once a week.
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Old 12-06-2014, 08:46 AM
 
1,690 posts, read 2,011,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
Whether I go to a dealership, a jiffy lube type place or private mechanic when I check my tire pressure afterward it's always around 37 or 38 psi. This is on a regular passenger car with standard tires. The information sticker on the door clearly states 30 psi and yet they all do it. When I get home I have to let air out.
Not a huge deal but I don't get it. What's so hard about inflating tires to the proper pressure and why should I have remind mechanics 38 psi is too high for most standard tires?
Anyone else have this problem?
Such ignorance is standard operating procedure for the like of Jiffy Lube. Disappointing at a dealership. My shop in Austin, Texas inflates tires to specific vehicle manufacturer recommendations. Keep looking for a competent person to service your vehicle and best of luck!

Are you sure your gauge is accurate?

Don in Austin
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Old 12-06-2014, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 24,618,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by need4speed2012 View Post
4. You're reading the door sticker instead of reading the sidewall !!!
Wrong. The door sticker specifies the correct pressure.
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Old 12-06-2014, 09:20 AM
 
1,690 posts, read 2,011,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
Wrong. The door sticker specifies the correct pressure.
Yes. That's the whole reason it is printed there. Second guessing this can cause handling, tire wear and ride problems, possibly even to the point of being hazardous. If the car has tires that are substantially different from original equipment the car owner can only "wing it."

Don in Austin
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Old 12-06-2014, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Maine
1,105 posts, read 1,432,245 times
Reputation: 1733
One thing people need to understand with tire pressure: it is also about the amount of the tire that is in contact with the road. I could take my studded snow tires on my Honda and inflate them up to the 44 psi maximum on the sidewall, but that is going to reduce their effectiveness at doing what I bought them for, so they sit at the 30 psi recommended on the door post.

Consider this as well, higher pressures mean the tire acts less as a cushion when you hit bumps, so your steering and suspension parts are taking more of a beating.

If you drive in areas where the roads are smooth and you don't have to deal with reduced traction situations, there is little disincentive to go to the maximum sidewall pressure. You will get better gas mileage and your tires will last longer. If you drive a gutless four-cylinder, like I do, you'll actually notice a positive difference in acceleration.
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Old 12-06-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,684 posts, read 45,045,110 times
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The tire information on those door posts are for the original tires the vehicle came with. If you've changed tires the pressure recommendation will probably be different and I would go by what the tire people say for the new tires for your area.
My original Michelins said 32 psi, my later version replacement Michelins say 35psi.
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Old 12-06-2014, 02:02 PM
 
Location: OC, CA
9,862 posts, read 13,194,178 times
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Since Discount educated me living in cold weather every 10 degrees takes away/adds 1 PSI. Every month you lose about 2-3 PSI.

My Camry says 29 PSI and I would never, rides like a boat. 34-35 PSI rides a bit rough but it does help with the gas, and with less rollling resistance it frankly shift auto better, but that's one of the flaws on this car, jerky trans.

Mechanics tell me 32 PSI is standard for what the set PSI .
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Old 12-06-2014, 02:05 PM
 
Location: OC, CA
9,862 posts, read 13,194,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoastalMaineiac View Post
One thing people need to understand with tire pressure: it is also about the amount of the tire that is in contact with the road. I could take my studded snow tires on my Honda and inflate them up to the 44 psi maximum on the sidewall, but that is going to reduce their effectiveness at doing what I bought them for, so they sit at the 30 psi recommended on the door post.

Consider this as well, higher pressures mean the tire acts less as a cushion when you hit bumps, so your steering and suspension parts are taking more of a beating.

If you drive in areas where the roads are smooth and you don't have to deal with reduced traction situations, there is little disincentive to go to the maximum sidewall pressure. You will get better gas mileage and your tires will last longer. If you drive a gutless four-cylinder, like I do, you'll actually notice a positive difference in acceleration.
You mention a good point I noticed the other day driving in the rain. I think my PSI was around 35 and with worn roads in part of OC it was losing a bit of traction, but that could also be due to the road grime finally being washed away by rain.
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Old 12-06-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,625 posts, read 2,019,408 times
Reputation: 1070
One thing not mentioned yet is that shops inflate and check the tires when they are up on a lift. With a standard lift where the tires hang unloaded there is no additional pressure in the tires. When it is lowered to the ground the weight of the car deforms the tire and can increase pressure by a few PSI.

I run all mine about 5psi over recommended, usually about 36psi. Saves tires, saves gas....and if some air leaks over time i'm not running them under-inflated, which is much worse.
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Old 12-06-2014, 02:19 PM
 
Location: OC, CA
9,862 posts, read 13,194,178 times
Reputation: 8730
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarborRat View Post
One thing not mentioned yet is that shops inflate and check the tires when they are up on a lift. With a standard lift where the tires hang unloaded there is no additional pressure in the tires. When it is lowered to the ground the weight of the car deforms the tire and can increase pressure by a few PSI.

I run all mine about 5psi over recommended, usually about 36psi. Saves tires, saves gas....and if some air leaks over time i'm not running them under-inflated, which is much worse.
The other issue I have seen with running mine over the last several years is it appears to have caused accelerated wear on the suspension. I have heard my struts in front bottom out when I have 35PSI and hit a large pothole or uneven pavement, but yeah MPG and tire wear are better.
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