U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: For those who have gotten 200,000 miles or more out of their vehicle, what is your secret?
I've gotten over 200,000 miles with my import(s) 27 42.86%
I've gotten over 200,000 miles with my domestic(s) 24 38.10%
I've gotten over *300,000* miles with my import(s) 5 7.94%
I've gotten over *300,000* miles with my domestic(s) 9 14.29%
Seriously?!? Why would anyone want to drive a car this long? 14 22.22%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 63. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 11-27-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,351 posts, read 4,931,903 times
Reputation: 2547

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post
At 40,000 miles I'm done. That is considered "old age" for me. That's about 6-7 years.
What an informative post on the topic of car longevity. NOT.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-27-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Earth
797 posts, read 375,925 times
Reputation: 775
Either or. remember though,like your focus,gaskets will go out far before any metal part. Engines are full of gaskets. Engines will last a lifetime usually if nothing else happens,but gaskets fail etc. Any new car,im pretty sure it'll hit 200k no problem as long as maintenance is done.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-27-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
12,559 posts, read 18,941,353 times
Reputation: 7201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post
At 40,000 miles I'm done. That is considered "old age" for me. That's about 6-7 years.
I bought my van with 48,000 miles on it and just passed 170,000! Doesn't feel old at all.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-27-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Anchored in Phoenix
1,942 posts, read 3,788,399 times
Reputation: 1763
Here's a different idea: Forget about miles. Figure on always renting near wherever you work. Then you can forget about worrying about gas prices and so forth. Yes I do not own real estate and always live within a 30 minute commute. Currently it's a 20 minute commute. The plus is that I can easily take better job opportunities every few years when I am ready to jump while home owners are only looking within commuting distance.

My 2003 car is my only car and has 84,000 miles on it. I admit for two of those 11 and a half years I lived on the east coast and rented cars while this 2003 car sat mostly in a car port (I'd go back home every 2 weeks and drive it). All the same, even with 9 and a half years of driving my car where I work, that is about 9,000 miles a year.

With the time left over from commuting I have the energy to exercise 80 minutes a day and keep defined abs in my 50s. And with the money saved from not buying a new car I fund a stock index fund - low expense of course.

My car will probably last another 7 years or so. Maybe all the way to retirement.

For me, fitness and financial freedom are much higher priority than show.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-27-2014, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
2,721 posts, read 7,477,393 times
Reputation: 1063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
Here's a different idea: Forget about miles. Figure on always renting near wherever you work. Then you can forget about worrying about gas prices and so forth. Yes I do not own real estate and always live within a 30 minute commute. Currently it's a 20 minute commute. The plus is that I can easily take better job opportunities every few years when I am ready to jump while home owners are only looking within commuting distance.

My 2003 car is my only car and has 84,000 miles on it. I admit for two of those 11 and a half years I lived on the east coast and rented cars while this 2003 car sat mostly in a car port (I'd go back home every 2 weeks and drive it). All the same, even with 9 and a half years of driving my car where I work, that is about 9,000 miles a year.

With the time left over from commuting I have the energy to exercise 80 minutes a day and keep defined abs in my 50s. And with the money saved from not buying a new car I fund a stock index fund - low expense of course.

My car will probably last another 7 years or so. Maybe all the way to retirement.

For me, fitness and financial freedom are much higher priority than show.


I agree to your point. Some Metro areas are easier on cars because of low traffic volume and close proximity to work. I use to live the the SF bay area and most people would commute to the larger cities because they find cheaper housing in the surrounding cities. I knew people who would commute 2-3 hours on a daily basis because they own a house and not renting an apartment close to their job. I moved to Las Vegas and the city has good roads and traffic volume is much less than SF bay area. Commute times are also lower in time and mileage.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-27-2014, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,174,051 times
Reputation: 2392
Nice idea, but I live 10 miles from pavement and 80 miles from the nearest car rental
Car ownership is pretty much a requirement in rural areas.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2014, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,174,051 times
Reputation: 2392
Interesting results from my poll.

1. No, imports really don't seem to be worth the "import premium" unless I'm planning to trade it off for my next vehicle. However, I drive stuff til it dies, so trade-in value isn't really a factor.
And domestics seem to last, too, if taken care of.

2. 30% of respondents don't see a point in squeezing as many miles as possible out of their vehicles.
I find that intriguing. I guess I've never had that much disposable income, so it's probably a philosophy I simply can't understand.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2014, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,170 posts, read 16,529,270 times
Reputation: 13369
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
...30% of respondents don't see a point in squeezing as many miles as possible out of their vehicles.
I find that intriguing. I guess I've never had that much disposable income, so it's probably a philosophy I simply can't understand.
It's that there comes a point when it simply doesn't pay to keep fixing/replacing all the little things that can wear out on an older, high mileage car. I finally traded my 2000 F250 PSD a few weeks ago. I bought it new, and it had just turned 153K on the odometer. Dollar-wise, I'd have been far ahead if I'd have traded it a couple years ago at 100K. I liked it, trusted it on long trips, but the little things just got out of hand. In the past two years I had to replace the alternator twice, shocks, clutch, glow plugs twice, glow plug relay 3 times. Mechanic said it needed to have the turbo waste gate replaced, the clutch replaced AGAIN because oil from the waste gate was dripping on it, three injectors were going bad, and it needed new ball joints. Estimates to fix the immediate problems were going to be $8-$10K (depending on what you call "immediate"), and I knew from past experience that next year there would be more unscheduled maintenance. The engine itself, I'm sure was fine. It was all the little things. If I could fix them myself, it wouldn't be bad. If I didn't drive it a lot, it wouldn't be bad, but I've been driving it 30K miles per year lately, and maintenance costs were beyond reasonable.

Unless your car is appreciating rapidly or you have a deep love for the old girl, there IS NO POINT IN SQUEEZING AS MANY MILES AS POSSIBLE out of your vehicle, not when it costs more than replacing the whole thing. If I could have afforded to keep my old F250 in good condition, I would have. I couldn't, so I traded it for a new, smaller vehicle.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2014, 07:45 PM
 
8,170 posts, read 6,016,298 times
Reputation: 10564
Quote:
Originally Posted by GnomadAK View Post
I had a 86 Escort that I got 215K out of, after replacing the motor at 180K or so for a blown head gasket. After selling it, I would see it driving around town for years, and must have had 300K on it by the last time I saw it on the street. It was pretty sad by then.

Almost any rig these days will see 200K, it's the new 100K.
You know, I bust on Escorts because my first car was one.. But.. They were halfway decent for what they were. I had an 84 Escort that was stolen and it broke down on them while being stolen.. I always thought that was karma.

But, the 86 I replaced it with.. blew a head gasket on it.. Those things were rather notorious for that.. Replaced it myself because that engine was pretty easy to work on. Cost less than two hundred bucks to do. I wound up giving it to a relative as his first car.

But, it all depends on what you mean by 'will see' 200k.. I think your odds of a fairly major failure, such as transmission, shoot way up around 150k-200k.. But I wouldn't consider a transmission failure to be an end of life event. I had the transmission rebuilt on my Colorado over the summer for about $3k, at about 170k miles. I fully expect to get to at least 250k on it.. Perhaps even 300k.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
It's that there comes a point when it simply doesn't pay to keep fixing/replacing all the little things that can wear out on an older, high mileage car.

Unless your car is appreciating rapidly or you have a deep love for the old girl
And there's the thing. If you look at trade in on a 2005 Chevy Colorado regular cab with 170k miles.. It made no sense to put $3k worth of repairs into a vehicle worth, maybe, $1500.. But.. You take the intangibles into account.. I like having a light truck.. You can't buy a light truck anymore. Buying a used, lord knows the condition (Mine, you could eat off the engine it's so clean).. I couldn't buy anything new that would match what I have. I'm attached to it.. So, while financially it may not have made perfect sense.. Emotionally it did. And, frankly, since I think I can easily keep it running to 250k or higher.. It MIGHT make sense financially down the road.

Plus, you know.. A new vehicle is going to run $17k now.. So, $3k in repairs today is like $500 15 years ago.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2014, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,174,051 times
Reputation: 2392
I'm not particularly attached to any of my vehicles (well, OK, I do love our '97 Powerstroke…300K on ours), but the whole nickel-and-dime argument doesn't really make sense unless you're actually spending a LOT of nickels and dimes.
Personally, I never have.

Figure a small car payment of $250 a month, that's $3000 a year, every year!
I've never had a vehicle on which I was putting in $3000 a year for repairs, or even close… (But then, my husband is a good shade-tree, so that's probably part of my perspective.)
However, even if I were paying a mechanic, I still don't see a water pump this year or radiator next costing $3000.

Last edited by itsMeFred; 11-28-2014 at 09:07 PM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top