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Old 11-26-2014, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,730 posts, read 8,720,259 times
Reputation: 11285

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
Now, your dealer replacing the cat.. I'm actually a little surprised at that. Not that I think it was wrong or anything.. I'm just a little surprised that it didn't become an 'oh, look what we found while...' situation. But, I can also bet that they at least knew there was a chance of that happening. What i'm confused about.. And, i'll admit that I am not familiar with Subaru at all.. I'm assuming that the O2 sensor 'on' the cat is actually just past it.. Not that it matters.. But that would be the downstream O2 sensor.. Probably it's on the pipe that comes out of the cat, and that pipe is part of the cat assembly.. Not that it matters, really.. But i'm guessing that it wasn't on the catalytic converter container itself.
I think you are right. He did talk about a pipe but wasnít clear. I am just glad they did not stick us with the cost of the cat for some phony reason without disclosing the real cause. As you said they should have been able to take out the sensor without damage. I had my mechanic remove O2 sensors on a 20 year old car.
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Old 11-27-2014, 06:49 AM
 
1,774 posts, read 1,737,276 times
Reputation: 2700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargobound View Post

These are the same people that try and use that as leverage as to why youíre ripping them off or why you should do it cheaper. Heck, no one walks into their doctorís office with a WebMD self diagnostic and says they want a deal because they found the problem and know how to fix it.
My dad is a doctor and complains about how pretty much EVERY patient does that these days!
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Old 11-27-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,981 posts, read 3,780,137 times
Reputation: 3789
Default Subaru and OEM parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
The local Subaru dealer wants $450 to change one O2 sensor. Here is the break down. $100 just to read the code, $250 for the sensor itself and $100 for labor. This is my sonís car and he needed it done so I gave them the go ahead. Itís been a while since I have been to a dealer. Their charges are off the charts. The sensor is just $50 online. That diagnostic charge is the biggest a rip off. I can do it at home in 2 minutes.
Don't feel too bad. Subaru is one of those manuf. that has a lot of OEM (original equipment manufactured) parts that don't have an aftermarket equivalent. Example: I had an old Subaru wagon with nada wrong with it but the shocks. The length was unique to Subaru; no after market, so it would cost the value of the wagon to get a set of new shocks, and installation was my problem.

What you find online really is more frustrating than problem solving. I'm in an area of Canada and shipping is obscene, ordering something online that you usually can't return easilly is a problem, and basically we're in a barrel up here with the lid on, and everyone lines up to do us: govt. first, then franchise dealers, then employment.

Suggestion: Your son is young and needs reliable transportation. Look at new and just make the payments and/or look for an early lease return WITH a tranferable warranty. At least in the USA you have choices.
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Old 11-27-2014, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,730 posts, read 8,720,259 times
Reputation: 11285
Good points thedwightguy. I do have a local shop that I take my vehicles to but they are the the most organized people. No appointments. You just drive in. There are no guarantees they will get it fixed the same day. They have to get parts and if they can’t the car has to stay. The worst times are on Saturdays and before holidays. If the problem requires the dealer in any way, well you are out of luck. Given what happened I am glad I took it to the dealer. It isn’t my car and my son has to go back on Sunday so I couldn’t risk it.
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Old 11-27-2014, 11:08 AM
 
5,092 posts, read 3,350,477 times
Reputation: 4903
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
The local Subaru dealer wants $450 to change one O2 sensor. Here is the break down. $100 just to read the code, $250 for the sensor itself and $100 for labor. This is my sonís car and he needed it done so I gave them the go ahead. Itís been a while since I have been to a dealer. Their charges are off the charts. The sensor is just $50 online. That diagnostic charge is the biggest a rip off. I can do it at home in 2 minutes.
Why you don't go to dealerships.

Last time I used a dealership they stripped a bunch of nuts on three of my tires.

Wanted $300+ to fix it.

Had a small garage do it for $50.
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Old 11-27-2014, 12:12 PM
 
14,920 posts, read 10,743,422 times
Reputation: 4828
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
$100 just to read the code
For a hundred buck, just buy yourself a code reader.
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Old 11-27-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,176 posts, read 39,339,783 times
Reputation: 40698
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammertime33 View Post
For a hundred buck, just buy yourself a code reader.

If the person can't fix it himself why do y'all suggest he buy a code reader? Even if he has one and reads the code the garage is still going to do a diagnosis.
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Old 11-27-2014, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,197 posts, read 4,255,862 times
Reputation: 9456
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
If the person can't fix it himself why do y'all suggest he buy a code reader? Even if he has one and reads the code the garage is still going to do a diagnosis.
I don't understand why people just don't understand what you just said there. It's been said multiple times in this thread.

If it were that easy, the shops would've gone out of business long ago.
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Old 11-27-2014, 04:36 PM
 
8,245 posts, read 6,058,835 times
Reputation: 10605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army_Guy View Post
I don't understand why people just don't understand what you just said there. It's been said multiple times in this thread.

If it were that easy, the shops would've gone out of business long ago.
Not any different than coming on an internet forum and saying 'what's wrong with my car'

OP here is a different case, because he wasn't asking for the diagnosis.. More whether the costs were appropriate.

90% of the codes thown by a vehicle are emissions related. But.. Investing $20 in a code reader isn't bad even for someone who isn't going to fix it themselves.

You get a check engine light.. Throw your code reader on there.. it's a P0420 code.. You know that most likely.. Ok, I can drive it until the next inspection (when it likely won't pass) and nothing is going to fall off it, most likely.

You get a P0128.. That's something that would likely have a little more urgency.. You know that your thermostat has likely failed with that code. Thankfully, sticking open rather than closed. But, probably a little more emphasis on getting fixed.

But.. another good reason for a car owner to have one is that if they hook up and read out a P0128 code, and a repair shop says they need a new transmission.. They'd know to question it a little bit.

You read it and it's a MAP code.. Well.. That's not something that the layman should try to fix.. Not because the MAP sensor is so hard to replace, but the odds that it's NOT a MAP sensor.. You know, you don't mind tossing the $50 at it and hoping it solves the problem, that's fine.. But it seems that half the time I get a MAP code on any vehicle, it's NOT the MAP sensor itself that's the problem.

You get a P0300 code.. First off, you probably know that something is wrong because you can feel it, and second, you take it directly to the shop because the odds are, that's something that you need advanced equipment to diagnose. There's so many possibilities of what could be wrong, you could easily throw $1000 in parts at it and miss on all of them. Plugs, plug wires, ignition coils, head gasket, valves, fuel injection.. All could cause that code (though, some are more likely than others)
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Old 11-27-2014, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,730 posts, read 8,720,259 times
Reputation: 11285
Matter of fact I do have a code reader but as others have said what good does it do other than knowing the code? If it were my car I would have been so quick to take it to the dealer but I didn’t want to take a chance with my son’s car. The OBDII plug is on the driver side on every car I have owned but not on this Subaru. I didn’t even find it. To add an additional kink to the story, by the time he got here the light had gone off. I asked the dealer if they can still diagnose the problem with CEL on ad they said yes. I asked what the code was but the service manager didn’t know. The O2 sensor issues usually throws a P0152 but as Labonte18 said codes mean so many different things. On my Explorer I have P0171 and P0174. They report lean mixtures on Banks 1 and 2. Causes you ask?

PCM software needs to be updated
Vacuum leaks (Intake Manifold Gaskets, vacuum hoses, PCV hoses, etc.)
Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF)
Plugged Fuel Filter or weak Fuel Pump
Plugged or dirty Fuel Injectors

So these home code readers are really for entertainment purposes. You need a much better diagnostic tool.
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