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Old 11-26-2014, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, PA
13,792 posts, read 8,776,862 times
Reputation: 11308

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The local Subaru dealer wants $450 to change one O2 sensor. Here is the break down. $100 just to read the code, $250 for the sensor itself and $100 for labor. This is my sonís car and he needed it done so I gave them the go ahead. Itís been a while since I have been to a dealer. Their charges are off the charts. The sensor is just $50 online. That diagnostic charge is the biggest a rip off. I can do it at home in 2 minutes.
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Old 11-26-2014, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Shady Drifter
2,444 posts, read 1,748,327 times
Reputation: 4060
So do it at home. The dealership is in business to make money, why are you shocked that they are charging to perform services?
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Old 11-26-2014, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Herndon, VA
1,928 posts, read 1,837,251 times
Reputation: 6273
Autozone will read codes for free, and the Internet is a great resource for deciphering codes. O2 sensors can be a challenge to change, but are easy enough for most DYIers. If nothing else, do yourself a favor and find a good local mechanic who you can build a relationship with. Depending on dealers is an expensive proposition.
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Old 11-26-2014, 01:21 PM
 
2,025 posts, read 2,777,083 times
Reputation: 2504
You do need to determine which O2 sensor it is, some cars have as many as 6. That's where the $100 comes in. As for changing it, they are often miserable to remove as they've been in a hot dirty environment since they left the factory and are just about welded in. Sure it can be done but it's not always a walk in the park.
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Old 11-26-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,191,671 times
Reputation: 2392
And you can buy a code reader for about $20-50. Check Amazon.
Well worth the money, IMO.
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Old 11-26-2014, 01:30 PM
 
4,932 posts, read 5,572,668 times
Reputation: 7157
That car would have ran for 10 more years with that bad o2 sensor.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:21 PM
 
8,266 posts, read 6,104,315 times
Reputation: 10646
Guarantee you that Subaru dealer is using a genuine subaru part as well.. And the part you're looking up online likely isn't.

that's not to say that the OEM part is any better than an aftermarket.. Though, I think with a part like that, I probably would use OEM.

The charge to read the code is horsecrap, IMO.. Seriously, you plug in, 10 seconds later, here's your code list. Charging anything for doing that is crap... Unless you charge for it, and waive that charge so long as you do the work to repair it.

I can understand that, at least.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:36 PM
 
Location: OC, CA
9,863 posts, read 13,279,912 times
Reputation: 8732
I did mine by myself years ago.

I you are DIY , and AZ get can't the correct code, pay the dealer for their 100k plus diagnostic machine, buy the dealer part and replace yourself.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Long Island
8,520 posts, read 11,479,043 times
Reputation: 4781
Don't they let you roll the diagnostic fee into the price of the fix instead of making it separate? Or is that only at independent shops?
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:47 PM
 
2,888 posts, read 4,504,017 times
Reputation: 1852
1. The code reader will tell you exactly which O2 sensor is bad. There is no guess work or expertise needed.

2. The car could have continued being used with a bad O2 sensor.

3. I seriously doubt an original Subaru O2 sensor cost $250. (An original Bosch O2 sensor for a BMW, Mercedes, Audi cost between $50-$100.)

4. The installation of the O2 sensor cannot be more than 15 minutes.

5. Most places waive the diagnostic fee if you go ahead with the repairs.

6. The dealership is in business to make money but not rip people off.
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