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Old 11-30-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,166 posts, read 16,515,249 times
Reputation: 13359

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I had 76K miles on my F250's factory-installed Firestones when I decided to replace them due to being 8 years old. The next set, the same tires, were worn out at 60K in three years. (Driving on more rock/gravel roads.)

My wife's '96 Saturn still has the originals on it with around 70K. I checked them a week ago, and they still have plenty of tread. The Saturn is strictly a work car for my wife. She drives it less than 20 miles per week and never over 35 mph or I'd have replaced them due to age. (Age makes them unsafe, but really only at high speeds when tire temps get high, which never happens in this case.)
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Old 11-30-2014, 10:47 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,013,914 times
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Why not do a search and read some on the subject and makeup your own mind.
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Old 11-30-2014, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Ak-Rowdy, OH
1,522 posts, read 2,382,115 times
Reputation: 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
My wife's '96 Saturn still has the originals on it with around 70K. I checked them a week ago, and they still have plenty of tread. The Saturn is strictly a work car for my wife. She drives it less than 20 miles per week and never over 35 mph or I'd have replaced them due to age. (Age makes them unsafe, but really only at high speeds when tire temps get high, which never happens in this case.)
There's a time when spending $400 makes sense, and that time is when your tires are 18 years old. I don't care how slow they are driven. I mean, really man, it's $400. It's not like you're talking about buying a cheap couch or TV, it's the only part of the car that touches the road. That your wife drives. Regularly.

There are limits to being frugal. Ugh.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:22 AM
 
33,139 posts, read 39,078,504 times
Reputation: 28489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubi3 View Post
Thanks, I'll get them checked. I bought this car new in 2006 and it has not quite 20,000 miles. I don't want to start having flats.
Your tires are getting close to 10 years old, as rubber has a tendency to dry out and rot over time i'd throw a new set of rubber on the car irregardless of tread depth.
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Old 12-01-2014, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Denver
3,139 posts, read 6,903,098 times
Reputation: 2907
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquareBetterThanAll View Post
There's a time when spending $400 makes sense, and that time is when your tires are 18 years old. I don't care how slow they are driven. I mean, really man, it's $400. It's not like you're talking about buying a cheap couch or TV, it's the only part of the car that touches the road. That your wife drives. Regularly.

There are limits to being frugal. Ugh.
Does your wife agree with your logic?
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:10 AM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 9,608,567 times
Reputation: 11672
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Why not do a search and read some on the subject and makeup your own mind.
I thought that's what I was doing.
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
470 posts, read 1,198,108 times
Reputation: 396
You should replace them every 6-8 years because they start to dry-rot and crack. If they haven't reached that age but you see the wear indicators in the tread you should replace them.

If it were me and my tires were from 2006 I would be looking at new tires right now.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Long Island
8,509 posts, read 11,383,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Your tires are getting close to 10 years old, as rubber has a tendency to dry out and rot over time i'd throw a new set of rubber on the car irregardless of tread depth.
This happened to me too and after 5 years I changed mine out due to tire dry rot - google some images. The tread depth still had 6/32 left but I still had to get it swapped out.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
275 posts, read 224,707 times
Reputation: 500
Here's the recommendations from TireRack.com I highly recommend their site for research. Feel free to buy from them if it makes sense to you. I have no affiliation.

I'll add emphasis where I think appropriate. I was very surprised to find accurate and reasonable information from a vendor that sells tires.

From http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete...jsp?techid=184 Tire Replacement


It's Not Just About Wear. Do You Know When to Say When?
There are many reasons why tires should be replaced. Here are some Tire Rack recommendations based on currently available information:
The vehicle manufacturer owner's manual may have specific instructions covering tire inspections and replacement considerations based on the vehicle manufacturer's understanding of the specific vehicle application. Drivers should use their vehicle owner's manual to confirm any tire inspection or replacement recommendations.
Tires should be replaced when their remaining tread depth is no longer appropriate for the weather conditions expected to be encountered. Tire Rack recommends replacing tires at approximately 5/32" of remaining tread depth for driving in snow, 4/32" for driving on wet roads and 2/32" for driving on dry roads.
Most small cuts and punctures in the tread area (up to 1/4"in size) can be repaired by trained personnel using industry-approved methods. These tires can be returned to service if they have not been driven on while flat or with very low inflation pressure.
Tires cut or punctured in the shoulder or sidewall areas, as well as any tires driven on while flat or with very low inflation pressure even for short periods of time are often damaged beyond repair and should be replaced. Driving on a tire while flat or with very low inflation pressure will permanently weaken the tire's internal structure, rendering it more susceptible to catastrophic failure.
Tires that exhibit any bubbles, blisters or bulges, or have large cuts, cracks or other significant damage from road hazards in the tread, shoulder and/or sidewall areas should be replaced. Only inspecting the tire's innerliner after dismounting the tire from the wheel will reveal the probable cause and help determine if the tire manufacturer's workmanship and materials warranty applies.
Most tires will need to be replaced for other reasons before any prescribed calendar age, therefore the following recommended calendar age removal periods in no way reduces the driver's responsibility to replace worn or damaged tires as needed.
Tires that have been in use for five (5) years or more should be carefully inspected periodically for external signs of aging. While this inspection will confirm the condition of the exterior rubber, it cannot assess internal degradation or damage.
Previously unused, never-mounted tires should not be put into service if they are more than six (6) years old even if they were properly stored.
All tires (including spare tires) manufactured more than ten (10) years previously should be removed from service and be replaced as a precaution, even if such tires appear serviceable and have not reached the legal wear limit.


-------------------------------------------------



Notice the age guidelines are precautionary. Even in states that require annual safety inspection like PA, do not require, by law, replacing tires after a certain age.
If replacing a 5 year old tire makes you feel better, by all mean feel free.


In southern California I ran tires to nearly bald because wet conditions are nearly non-existent. In the pacific north-west where it rains a lot, I replaced tires at 3/32nd inch tread remaining. Snow conditions require even more tread.

Last edited by Neosec; 12-01-2014 at 07:40 AM..
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:03 AM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,745,422 times
Reputation: 1136
Consumer reports suggests inserting a quarter into the tread groove of the tire, with George Washington's head down, and if the top of his head is sticking out beyond the tire then it's time to replace.
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