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Old 08-13-2015, 01:41 AM
mm4 mm4 started this thread
 
5,711 posts, read 3,139,838 times
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Stopping it, then not letting it stop.

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2015/08/13/hackers-hijack-car-insurance-gadget-hit-corvette-brakes/?intcmp=hpbt4
http://www.wired.com/2015/08/hackers...on-car-gadget/

It follows this a few weeks ago: http://www.wired.com/2015/07/hackers...-jeep-highway/

As long as the public keeps buying the internet of things.

 
Old 08-13-2015, 01:44 AM
 
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just another reason for me to keep driving my virtually computer free fairmont(the only computer in the car is in my aftermarket stereo head unit).
 
Old 08-13-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
9,440 posts, read 5,819,570 times
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And before anyone thinks it's limited to that one french company
Hackers Cut a Corvette's Brakes Via a Common Car Gadget | WIRED

Regardless, the problem is hardly limited to Metromile, Coordina, or even their device supplier Mobile Devices. The insurance company Progressive also offers so-called “telematics-based insurance” using a similar OBD2 plug-in it calls the Snapshot. Earlier this year security researcher Corey Thuen found that the Progressive Snapshot device had its own serious vulnerabilities, though Thuen didn’t demonstrate a proof-of-concept attack. And researchers at the cybersecurity firm Argus found that the Zubie, an OBD2 device for personal tracking of driving efficiency, had hackable flaws, too.

And since no one has ever accused the current administration of ever improving security or has seen a 1984/Big Brother device they didn't like:

The use of those vulnerable dash gadgets could extend beyond consumers, too. An executive order from the White House in March called for federal agencies with fleets of more than 20 vehicles to use telematics systems whenever possible to improve vehicle efficiencies.

Terrorist bomber? How much damage could a terrorist hacker do if they decided to cause thousands or tens of thousands of vehicles to crash all at once?
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:01 PM
 
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Stories like these make me shake my head at people who WANT a self-driving car. There isn't a hacker who can hack my brain (I hope) but do you REALLY want to be driving 60 down the highway when some troll from 4chan takes control of the wheel?

I'm getting an old Jeep, not some shiny new toy from google.
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:07 PM
 
32,465 posts, read 26,339,737 times
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actually you can have all the fun stuff, except anything that is connected to the ethernet in any way shape or form. no bluetooth, no cell service, etc. you dont have to go back very far to get that either, say around 2004 or earlier.
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:13 PM
 
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Shrug, my car is connected via a ODB interface to various networked systems. Car security of the data bus needs to improve. Until recently the ODB interface was never connected to anything remotely. You could still do things by plugging something into it, but once you have physical access theres tons of bad things possible.

Its only been recently that networked systems took advantage of this, allowing people to monitor the systems of their vehicle in more ways.

The security on the cars will improve, just as it has in other things. It will never be perfect I suspect. But I do think it can be made good enough to mitigate the concerns brought to light.
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:19 PM
mm4 mm4 started this thread
 
5,711 posts, read 3,139,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Shrug, my car is connected via a ODB interface to various networked systems. Car security of the data bus needs to improve. Until recently the ODB interface was never connected to anything remotely. You could still do things by plugging something into it, but once you have physical access theres tons of bad things possible.

Its only been recently that networked systems took advantage of this, allowing people to monitor the systems of their vehicle in more ways.

The security on the cars will improve, just as it has in other things. It will never be perfect I suspect. But I do think it can be made good enough to mitigate the concerns brought to light.
These are On-Board Device ports. Not Ol' Dirty Bastard.

Now that Google and Facebook and Apple and Microsoft are still plugging holes after, in some cases, generations, you're okay with rolling the dice on a moving vehicle with more lines of code than a passenger jet? Perennially updated with more?

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/th...-a-boeing-787/
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:47 PM
 
26,304 posts, read 12,852,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mm4 View Post
These are On-Board Device ports. Not Ol' Dirty Bastard.

Now that Google and Facebook and Apple and Microsoft are still plugging holes after, in some cases, generations, you're okay with rolling the dice on a moving vehicle with more lines of code than a passenger jet? Perennially updated with more?

The Ford GT uses more lines of code than a Boeing 787 | Digital Trends
Yes I am. Mostly because I know just how messed up every single piece of software is out there. OMG your car!

This is WAY down on my priorities. Think more "OMG my pick every damn utility (including nuclear), and database you depend on".

Great, you hacked every Ford-GT out there.....how many are driving RIGHT now. Thats your number.

A nuclear power plant gets their plant hacked via a USB thumb drive left in their parking lot, rewrites the interfaces, and voila.....

How many people are downwind. THATS your number.

And technically no, these are not On-Board Device ports. It actually stands for On-Board Diagnostics, the current version is OBDII to be specific (although I haven't checked if theres something newer recently). I mean if you want to get all technical, you could at least correct my typo with the correct information.

Fun fact-I've used them since 2009 to track information on my car in real time although recently I pulled it out in order to use a more off the shelf solution.
 
Old 08-13-2015, 04:55 PM
mm4 mm4 started this thread
 
5,711 posts, read 3,139,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Yes I am. Mostly because I know just how messed up every single piece of software is out there. OMG your car!

This is WAY down on my priorities. Think more "OMG my pick every damn utility (including nuclear), and database you depend on".

Great, you hacked every Ford-GT out there.....how many are driving RIGHT now. Thats your number.

A nuclear power plant gets their plant hacked via a USB thumb drive left in their parking lot, rewrites the interfaces, and voila.....

How many people are downwind. THATS your number.

And technically no, these are not On-Board Device ports. It actually stands for On-Board Diagnostics, the current version is OBDII to be specific (although I haven't checked if theres something newer recently). I mean if you want to get all technical, you could at least correct my typo with the correct information.

Fun fact-I've used them since 2009 to track information on my car in real time although recently I pulled it out in order to use a more off the shelf solution.
Several vehicles already have been hacked. But no nukes as far as anyone knows.

"Number"? Even if there's only one affected you should be concerned. But if quantity moves you, the vehicle's occupants often aren't the only ones affected.

There are minor volumes written on design failure, and the reasons for them. Poor human factors, engineering faults. There should at the very least be air gaps between some of these processes.

You don't go around introducing complexity on mission critical systems just for wows.
 
Old 08-13-2015, 08:21 PM
 
50,653 posts, read 26,726,952 times
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I couldn't pull up the link, but I'd heard that this happened on a C6 Vette. I'm not sure about the new models.

I've got a C7 with the Z51 package...there's a few things I'd like to hack into myself.
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