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Old 09-27-2016, 12:44 PM
 
185 posts, read 325,271 times
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I have a 97 Dodge Ram that overheats about a little bit more than 3/4 on the temp gauge (half being normal). If it's cooler weather it seems like most of the time it won't overheat but really hot weather it always does. But, even in cooler weather it will sometimes overheat. Keep in mind it never goes past the 3/4 point. As in it never fully overheats. I've replaced the t-stat, rad cap, water pump and fan clutch. Always changed out the coolant. Any suggestions? I have some sloshing coming from the heater core (air bubble) could that have an effect? Thank you.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
11,790 posts, read 12,632,569 times
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Yes an air bubble can have that effect. You may (also) have a hose somewhere that is leaking, but only leaks under certain temps/pressures because it has gotten old/brittle and has a crack that stays sealed most of the time.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Could be as simple as dead bugs in the air side of the radiator. Don't get carried away with high-pressure water like at a coin-op car wash, but just use an ordinary hose to flush them out, usually easier to flush from the engine side of the rad to the front, the opposite way the bugs got in there.

You do need to do whatever you need to do to get the air out of the system, not that familiar with this particular truck.
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Old 09-27-2016, 05:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Could be as simple as dead bugs in the air side of the radiator. Don't get carried away with high-pressure water like at a coin-op car wash, but just use an ordinary hose to flush them out, usually easier to flush from the engine side of the rad to the front, the opposite way the bugs got in there.

You do need to do whatever you need to do to get the air out of the system, not that familiar with this particular truck.

Yep.... Clogged radiator fins....

Or, bad, slipping fan clutch.
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Old 09-27-2016, 10:29 PM
 
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obstructed radiator ... either externally with bugs and debris which you should be able to flush with water and/or blow out with air.

Consider that the radiator itself may be obstructed internally so it can't dissipate enough heat. You can try to use a radiator flush solution or have a pro radiator shop clean it out. In some cases, the radiator may be so obstructed that it's best to replace it.

The way I check for an obstructed radiator is to spot check the temperatures of coolant flow in/out and across the radiator surfaces with an infra-red temp gauge. If you don't have one, they're readily available from places like Harbor Freight for under $20. Well worth the cost to check out the temps around the engine, hoses, radiator, t-stat housing, etc. You can also "check" the coolant temp gauge with the infra-red ... the dash gauge may be faulty (sensor, gauge, wiring, etc) so the coolant is at the right temp but the gauge is giving a bad reading.

The coolant flow through the heater core is not going to affect the flow through the radiator, it will affect the ability of the water to flow through the heater core for your heater source. Other than "burping" the hoses of for the heater, you may want to check that the heater hoses are hooked up correctly. Reversed hoses can cause the flow there to sound like it's "sloshing" or has a bubble in it that cannot flow out to the radiator top tank.

Don't overlook simple stuff ... like having the correct % of anti-freeze. I've seen more than one car brought into the shop where folk figured if some anti-freeze was good, pure anti-freeze was better ... only it won't dissipate heat as well as a 50% solution.
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