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View Poll Results: Which lift
Two post 9 50.00%
4 post with jacks 9 50.00%
Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-01-2017, 10:04 PM
 
16,489 posts, read 17,513,441 times
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So I'm getting bids to pour some concrete and redo my driveway. One section on the side of the house is potentially reserved for a lift.

The question is when I have the concrete poured the guy wants to know the weight of the lift and whatever I plan on parking there. Considering my trucks all weigh 8-8500 pounds it may need to be compacted more or poured thicker.

Now my real question is

Two post lift
Or
Four post lift (The 4 post will have the lift jacks option.

So you car guys what's your preference if you could get a lift? I think 4 post is much safer
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Old 05-01-2017, 11:16 PM
 
Location: UNMC Area
749 posts, read 363,766 times
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I'm not a professional wrencher, but pretty avid DIYer. I've felt MUCH safer under a 4 post lift than anything else - including the "center-single" that my brother has.
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Old 05-01-2017, 11:24 PM
 
10,869 posts, read 41,139,178 times
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If you're primarily working on 3/4 ton and heavier pick-up trucks, it's a no-brainer choice for me ... 4-post all the way. Much more solid support than picking up on the 4-point spots that a 2-post lift uses.

My shop had 2-post lifts for the cars we worked on and I did an infrequent job on a pick-up truck (my own). But when it came time to do major work ... A trans in my Dodge 2500 4x4, a friend with more experience than I offered to show me how in his shop. He had 4-post lifts. I was impressed at how much more stable and better access we had with the 4-poster. Later, when I needed to do a front hub, it was again much easier and solid to do it in his shop.
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Huntsville
5,328 posts, read 3,591,895 times
Reputation: 6007
While two post lifts are safe for the most part, I would opt for a 4 post if your vehicles are that heavy. My friend's 2 post is rated for 10k lbs, but there is added stability with a 4 post that you just don't get with a 2. Especially if you're outside where you could be under a truck with the wind blowing.
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:04 AM
 
Location: SW Corner of CT
1,730 posts, read 1,269,728 times
Reputation: 2073
4 Post would be my choice. I worked with the two post and quite a few times the Post would be in the way of the door making it a challenge to get in and out.....not too mention if you need to work with the door open and the vehicle on the lift
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:47 AM
 
16,489 posts, read 17,513,441 times
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I was worried about the access to the brakes when I do brakes. Reach from the outside of the lift. But looking online seems that it's accessible.
Great looks like 4 post is what I'm gonna go with. That was my initial choice.
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:49 AM
 
2,266 posts, read 1,217,719 times
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4 post. I'd only go with a 2 post for smaller vehicles weighing 5k lbs or less.
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Old 05-02-2017, 08:28 AM
 
9,818 posts, read 13,892,257 times
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6 inch concrete is standard for most lifts. Which is pretty much standard for quality concrete floor anyway.
I have 7 000lb scissor lift and I'd not recommend it.

I am considering selling it and buying a removable 2 post lift. It is simply mounted every time to be used, on anchors in concrete. It's a bit of a hassle to mount/dismount it every time but then it's not getting in your way. And it WILL, unless you have huge garage and constantly use it. For occasional user it's more of a hassle than good, to have it permanently mounted.
For long time I considered a portable lift. It sort of looks like a forklift that you can roll under car and lift it up. Lifts pick up trucks. Good part - you can stow it away when done. Bad part - it has arms crossing under the car limiting access.
So choose wisely. Think of what you will be doing with it. What loads. How high do you REALLY need it to go and how high CAN you go. Like my scissor lift. DAhh, can't use it on trucks unless buying $500 special bars and still, it's rather wobbly side to side. Scary.
Also be weary of cheap lifts. You get what you paid for. Craigslist is great source of them. I know a few instances when two Challengers were bought for $1000. Running for what, 7 years by now?

Last edited by ukrkoz; 05-02-2017 at 08:40 AM..
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Old 05-02-2017, 08:34 AM
 
9,818 posts, read 13,892,257 times
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Ah, and 4 post. Neighbor has one and he worked on my Silverado. I'd NOT buy one. Access is very limited by plates. Then you need all kinds of attachments for this and that. Thing is huge and steals ton of space out of garage.

Here's an idea. Why not to concrete a trench in the floor, so that you can simply walk down and under the car? That's what we had back in 'ol country. Works great and is cheaper and more reliable than any lift.
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Old 05-02-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
12,679 posts, read 9,425,981 times
Reputation: 14933
Personally, I wouldn't put a lift outside -- year round exposure to the weather is a concern. Moreover, we do get wind storms, and I wouldn't want to work on a vehicle up in the air with 35 mph wind gusts (let alone the more severe 50 mph).

But, as you have not yet built the driveway, I'd suggest hiring a structural engineer to design the correct footing to be placed underneath the 6 spots where you a future lift might be attached -- the 4 post and the 2 post. That gives you a lot of future flexibility. It wouldn't be expensive -- it isn't much work for the engineer.
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