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Old 07-16-2018, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,896 posts, read 4,435,835 times
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I was talking to a co-worker today who told me he order his 2017 Mustang GT a couple years ago when he took a trip up to Detroit. While I didn't ask him, it got me thinking about price negotiation on new cars. How many of you who custom ordered your vehicle also negotiated the price? What type of deal did you get?

Years ago, I was going to order a Mustang from the local Ford dealer. I showed them what I wanted, options, etc... gave them a starting point for price. Provided, I probably knew nothing about vehicle sales negotiations back then, but the salesman scoffed at my price and said, "Absolutely not! What do you want us to do, give our cars away? We don't negotiate on orders, the price is the price." Seemed kind of rude so I got up and left. Wound up finding the car I wanted on another lot and got an even lower price than what was negotiated with them, but I digress....

After that experience, I assumed that you could not negotiate price on vehicles you order from the factory, but an Edmunds editorial conveyed a different story. So, those with real life experience, tell me if you were able to negotiate price on a car you had to custom order - or if you even negotiated at all.
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Old 07-16-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,205 posts, read 17,088,984 times
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The problem with negotiating prices on special order cars is that the dealership doesn't necessarily know what incentives will be available when the vehicle is delivered.

Beyond that, though, there's still markup and holdback to work with. And assuming that you would pick up the car within a couple of days of delivery the floorplan cost would be minimal if anything.

When I sold cars we always negotiated, but we required a hefty deposit up front to make sure we didn't get stuck with something nobody else might want.
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Old 07-16-2018, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,855 posts, read 6,631,765 times
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It would depend on the car. A Mustang in a really unique edition may not get a discount, a Ford F150 in a certain color, or more mainstream Mustang, might.
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Old 07-16-2018, 01:49 PM
 
490 posts, read 151,524 times
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Unless you are trying to snag a very limited run, high performance car, a domestic salesperson with that attitude is an idiot. Decades ago, it was possible to order a real oddball domestic, that you might get stuck with. Today, there is very little deviation other than a handful of popular colors, and how many packages you want to stack on the order, so selling a pre-ordered car, on a tight margin is just a smart move, for a competitive dealer. The other thing to consider is how many of exactly the vehicle you want are sitting within a few hundred miles of you? A few years back I wanted a new 2014 Silverado in a specific color, with the heaviest trailering package and towing mirrors. Several local dealers claimed that the mirrors didn't exist, since they were too lazy to discuss how to order them with GM, but I found two exact trucks, on the ground at dealers. One was 300 miles northwest and another was 500 miles south. I grabbed the closer one, and closed the deal, at invoice, before I set foot in the dealer. Easy transaction, and no need to wait for anything, as it was exactly as I would of ordered it.
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Old 07-16-2018, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,896 posts, read 4,435,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
Unless you are trying to snag a very limited run, high performance car, a domestic salesperson with that attitude is an idiot. Decades ago, it was possible to order a real oddball domestic, that you might get stuck with. Today, there is very little deviation other than a handful of popular colors, and how many packages you want to stack on the order, so selling a pre-ordered car, on a tight margin is just a smart move, for a competitive dealer. The other thing to consider is how many of exactly the vehicle you want are sitting within a few hundred miles of you? A few years back I wanted a new 2014 Silverado in a specific color, with the heaviest trailering package and towing mirrors. Several local dealers claimed that the mirrors didn't exist, since they were too lazy to discuss how to order them with GM, but I found two exact trucks, on the ground at dealers. One was 300 miles northwest and another was 500 miles south. I grabbed the closer one, and closed the deal, at invoice, before I set foot in the dealer. Easy transaction, and no need to wait for anything, as it was exactly as I would of ordered it.
I remember what I was ordering was actually pretty common, yet the dealership didn't have the Mustang on the lot I wanted. It was going to be a convertible V6 in blue - again, very common from what I saw out on the streets, but they didn't want to play ball with me. I went to another Ford dealership down the road and wound up getting a GT cheaper. Wasn't in blue, but I was just fine with the silver. Kind of glad I didn't order the car now, but from that point on, I always figured you're not getting any discounts on ordered cars.
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Old 07-16-2018, 03:04 PM
 
1,282 posts, read 1,139,010 times
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Boy, it never occurred to me that you could negotiate the price on an ordered vehicle. My cousin is the only person I know personally that had two custom ordered cars, a 2008 Audi TTS and a 2018 Porsche Cayman. Both cars took over 4 months to build and deliver. I figured she has zero negotiating room because I thought 90% of the customer's negotiating leverage is based on how badly the sellers wants to make a sale; with no surplus inventory I would think the customer has a lot less power.
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Old 07-16-2018, 03:15 PM
 
5,525 posts, read 6,866,787 times
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Can you just wait until one comes in? Have you checked inventory online? You can check inventory for your whole state and have someone do a dealer trade for it.
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Old 07-16-2018, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
3,284 posts, read 2,436,029 times
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Feb 2008 I ordered a new GMC 2500. Prior to the order, I visited a few dealers to get an idea of what I wanted, color, interior, options, etc. With my list in hand, I went online and did the GMC order deal to see what the truck was going to cost me. Came in right at 51000 and change. Went to my dealer, who is a Chevrolet dealer to see if they could order the GMC, but they couldnt so they sent me to another dealership they owned who could. Filled out the form with them, price came in LOWER than the GMC website, by around 3 grand IIRC. In order to get the current incentives I had to go ahead and put down a down payment, which I didnt mind, and actually negotiated the price down another 2 grand after that. Truck ended up around 45000, and I was happy.

Now, the bad part! At the time, there was a strike at Eaton, who makes the axle assemblies. This pushed my truck out another 2 weeks, but again, no problem. Salesman calls me up, leaves a message for me to come by the next morning. Note, he didnt say my truck was ready, but didnt worry about that. I show up bright and early that Saturday morning, to find out my truck was deliverd to another dealership, and had been sold before it was caught. I wasnt going to wait for another truck, and showed my um, seat cushion, pretty bad! After calming me down, the salesman told to to pick something on the lot, or at another dealer, and they will get me a great deal. I almost left, but I did walk around and found the truck I wanted. Fully loaded 2500 LTZ, had everything GM offered. I wasnt too pleased that it had a diesel since diesel was like 5 bucks a gallon, but heres what happened:

Sticker was 54900, discounted to 49900, negotiated down to 47000. Dealer who sold my truck applied another 10000, and GM applied another 10000, and after my previous down payment plus another 500, I got the truck for 25000. Sold my prvious truck the next day for 11500, and made out like bandit. I sold this one for 34000 in 2013, bought my current 2013 with most of those funds. I did set some back and finaced like 5 grand, which id been paid for for a long time now.
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Old 07-16-2018, 05:25 PM
 
490 posts, read 151,524 times
Reputation: 1770
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwong7 View Post
Boy, it never occurred to me that you could negotiate the price on an ordered vehicle. My cousin is the only person I know personally that had two custom ordered cars, a 2008 Audi TTS and a 2018 Porsche Cayman. Both cars took over 4 months to build and deliver. I figured she has zero negotiating room because I thought 90% of the customer's negotiating leverage is based on how badly the sellers wants to make a sale; with no surplus inventory I would think the customer has a lot less power.
If she did indeed pay MSRP, I would strongly recommend that your relative hire a professional car buyer to negotiate her next transaction. For half a grand in fees, she would get a nice return on the giant pile of cash she leaves on the table.
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Old 07-16-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: NNV
1,902 posts, read 1,202,737 times
Reputation: 3831
You generally lose some leverage if you try to negotiate a price for an ordered car. You will have the most leverage if the car you want is on the dealer's lot and available. They can tell you are serious and don't want you to walk off the lot. You may have to order if it is a high demand car or a special order.

However, it's not a guarantee of a good price. Recently I went to a dealership to try and purchase a CPO car. The dealership insisted on adding $995 for dealer added options (I think teflon coating and 3M protection on the front end) which is a major markup. I wanted to start at several hundred under their advertised price. Their closer was a Lou Ferrigno type guy. I refused to acknowledge the $995 extra cost (it was not in the advertised price). They said we could not negotiate and I left. Bought at a dealer ship that did not play that game.
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