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Old 08-02-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: in the soup
3,799 posts, read 1,603,851 times
Reputation: 4337

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I've always done my own vehicle repairs, so they usually don't cost much. Began as a matter of necessity... these days it's a matter of pride and being frugal.

But my most expensive 'repair' was probably the engine I rebuilt in my trusty old 2001 Lumina a few months back. For the rebuild along with all new hoses and some associated minor repairs, it cost me about $900. On a car that would probably only sell for $1500 even with the rebuilt engine.

That would make no sense to most people... but I plan to drive this car for at least a few more years.
Where else are you going to get a clean car, good condition, reliable and everything works for $900?
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Old 08-02-2018, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,406 posts, read 10,106,099 times
Reputation: 13133
I've always DIY my repairs.

Most expensive has been wheel bearing and hub at approx $200 in parts
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Old 08-03-2018, 06:34 AM
 
Location: MN
3,157 posts, read 2,909,525 times
Reputation: 2452
Iím waiting on stonepa to mention one of his Ferrari items that will be $45k for oil and spark plugs. I watched guys do an oil change on a Bugatti on YouTube, they had to remove rear bumper, a giant piece above the back, another piece below and each had 10 times the amount of bolts of anything of lesser descent. There was also 16 oil plugs all over. Thereís a reason this procedure is expensive, though they saved a bunch by doing it themselves instead of the $21k for it. It did take two guys a whole day to do it.
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Old 08-03-2018, 08:34 AM
 
Location: in the soup
3,799 posts, read 1,603,851 times
Reputation: 4337
When I buy a vehicle, servicability matters... because I know that I'm the one that's gonna be working on it. I like a vehicle that's common as dirt (therefore cheap and available parts and information), with a proven track record of reliability, and with a reasonable amount of room to service the drivetrain.

A 4-cylinder Honda Accord (for example) will likely be a painless experience to own and maintain. Same goes for a Chevy Silverado. An Audi or a Fiat on the other hand? Good luck with that
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Old 08-03-2018, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,903 posts, read 3,196,564 times
Reputation: 6935
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I'm like Brian, I do the majority of my own repairs, only using a local guy when I don't feel like doing something.

I have generally put together my daily drivers by buying one car that has a blown motor but is in excellent shape otherwise, and then buying the same model car that is wrecked. Then I blend the two. It will cost me a couple of thousand to do the swap, with a lot of new parts while I am in there, but then I get a car that I can depend on for a long time without having to touch it very much.

So, I guess my most expensive repair might be in the $2-3,000 dollar range.
I like that you guys have the 1) tools...full set 2) space...a shop, with a lift I'm sure 3) time...which is money, for me, peak earnings years 4) patience and know-how, lot of tribal-knowledge in fixing cars and motorcycles.

Long ago I got into the latter, but lacking 1) and 2) was a non-starter over the long term.

I think you guys can actually monetize projects like I see on YouTube, guys dropping V8 small blocks into blown Porsche 911 flat-six bays. And making it work, with a little tweaking, and the end product is spectacular.

So what did I dodge? In 2001, almost bought a used 2008 Porsche 911 C4S for (a lot) of money, before puzzling out that was and is the one year with IMS failures they cannot repair via retrofit before it happens. If that engine goes, out of warranty, you're out ten to twenty grand for engine and transmission plus labor. Granted, no one has yet ponied up how frequent were the IMS failures on 996 and 997 911s, but why take the chance?? Tons did fail, for any or no reason. So: I bought a used Turbo instead, difficult to blow up (and it surely did not) in addition to being an immensely superior street car to the standard offerings.

Problem was designed away by the 991 series. I now have a 991.1 non-boosted, which is quite fun.
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Old 08-03-2018, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,903 posts, read 3,196,564 times
Reputation: 6935
Quote:
Originally Posted by wamer27 View Post
Iím waiting on stonepa to mention one of his Ferrari items that will be $45k for oil and spark plugs. I watched guys do an oil change on a Bugatti on YouTube, they had to remove rear bumper, a giant piece above the back, another piece below and each had 10 times the amount of bolts of anything of lesser descent. There was also 16 oil plugs all over. Thereís a reason this procedure is expensive, though they saved a bunch by doing it themselves instead of the $21k for it. It did take two guys a whole day to do it.
Couple years ago, I watched a man roll up to the weekly Exotics at RTC (show) in town in a 1962 Ferrari GTO race car w/plates. On the open market this car should fetch twenty to fifty(!) million dollars, per what the very few others available have fetched in the past ten years. It has a long provenance. There are exactly 36 left in the world. Never before, and likely never again, will I see anything like that car and he just toodled on in, revving up that V12 coming and going.

Some know who the guy is already, in Medina WA. Let's just say: early-in at a company with a big M. Former chief architect, Windows...yeah. I don't know him, personally, other than "hi, love your car" once and only once. Applied mathematics Ph.D, probably top- .000001% big-brains. He earned it.

Point? $21K would be a rounding error to this guy on his monthly account statements and household budget. My life savings, possibly the overhaul bill on one of those superyachts undertaken every few hundred or thousand running hours. A million dollars doesn't mean much to guys like that, either, who are worth hundreds of million or even billionaires. I do suspect that the few like him, and oil sheiks and their brat kids (who we sometimes see roll through Seattle, too) buy those Bugatti and Aventador Spyder ($600K) and La Ferrari ($1.3M) type cars, and have Jeeves and his staff maintain them. Just add the invoice to the household monthly budget, Jeeves, it's not a big thing. Oh, the guy mentioned above has the unique blue LaFerrari I've seen, too: not that is also a stunning car, to say the least.

Not jealous, just saying "saving" $21K on an oil change on a Veyron (I saw that video, too) was an amusing trick, but not typical for the true high rollers in this world.
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Old 08-03-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: San Diego
4,909 posts, read 1,332,760 times
Reputation: 3509
Replaced the 289 engine in a '66 Mustang. Got a rebuilt long block at the local auto parts store, rented a "cherry picker" engine crane, bought a new radiator, engine mounts, and some belts and hoses etc. Total cost about $850 in parts, which is chump change for cars today.

That was AFTER I reinforced the frame and cut the top off to make a convertible out of it. Designed a retractable top frame and put a fairly good top on it, then had it painted by Earl Schieb. Bought the car cheap since it had a ton of stuff wrong with it, for the express purpose of trying the convertible trick. Worked out pretty well! But that wasn't a "repair", so it doesn't count.
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Old 08-06-2018, 10:55 AM
 
14 posts, read 11,952 times
Reputation: 23
Paid the price of buying chevy. The transmission failed down several times and required expensive repair each time.
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,030 posts, read 3,989,048 times
Reputation: 14873
Quote:
Originally Posted by sikandersingh View Post
Paid the price of buying chevy. The transmission failed down several times and required expensive repair each time.

Due to my bad experiences with Ford and Dodge I've owned Chevy/GMC most of my life. Never had a transmission problem with any of them. I did have to replace the transmission in a used Dodge truck I bought.
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Old 08-08-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Wichita Falls Texas
1,004 posts, read 1,432,686 times
Reputation: 989
Most expensive to date was a transmission overhaul in 1986...AAMCO charged me $350 on a C4 in a Maverick. When I was making $3.35 hour! Now I could rebuild one myself with a $200 kit.
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