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Old 04-12-2010, 11:37 AM
 
1,474 posts, read 2,626,809 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
I have some old rims that I want to recycle,the tires are old and no one wants them. How can I get the tire off the rim?I dont want to take to a tire shop and pay 5 bucks a tire,how would you take the tire off? Is there any thing that will cut throught the rubber and tread easily?
I tried these once, good thing my wheels are multipiece. but it was still difficult to take them apart. I had to use a lot of lubricants to get the bead to slide off
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:43 AM
 
1 posts, read 4,056 times
Reputation: 10
well it is not that hard because i am only 16 and i am dismounting a semi tire in front of a class for a speech
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:31 AM
PDD
 
5,782 posts, read 5,596,160 times
Reputation: 6370
1. put the tires and wheels out at the curb with a sign that says $20 bucks, somebody is bound to steal them.
2. take them to a tire shop and tell them you will pick them up later that day.
3. take them to a tire shop and pay them the $20 and pick them up that day.
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Thornrose
845 posts, read 980,099 times
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I actually just did this, and while I was successful, I was wondering why I didn't just have a tire shop do it for me. I had an air cutting grinder and that was the only thing that got through the bead. A hacksaw will never cut through the bead. Trust me. I did 4 tires and saved an estimated $40 bucks. I don't reccomend it for the faint of heart. The smoke from cutting it will about kill you. And if you are trying to save the rim, do not do this. You will damage it no matter how careful you are. If not, then go to town on it.
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Old 11-02-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tn
406 posts, read 676,440 times
Reputation: 245
Call the local high school auto shop teacher. They might do it for free to give the kids practice. I know we had one in high school.. i flipped the big white walls around on my Regal.. then three months later they all seperated, so i bought some Keystone Klassic rims with tires from a buddy.. huge 15x10 rims in the back with a very tired 3.8 liter pushing the car.. but it looked cool!
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Old 11-02-2010, 03:40 PM
 
1,667 posts, read 2,508,127 times
Reputation: 606
I'd say buy a tire changer since you've got a lot and I'm guessing this is something you plan to regularly do. If this is just a one time deal, buy the tire changer and when you're done sell it. Are all these rims just steel wheels? Any tires usable for trailers? Where are you located?
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Old 11-03-2010, 02:34 PM
 
19,449 posts, read 14,928,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
I have some old rims that I want to recycle,the tires are old and no one wants them.
Let the recycler deal with it
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Old 09-21-2011, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Yucaipa, California
8,307 posts, read 9,873,935 times
Reputation: 4589
I knew a guy who would change his tires on his own rather then spending money at a shop. A shop down the street charges $3.00 to dismount, $3.00 to mount & $9.00 to balance. Another shop charges $5.00 to mount or dismount & $3.00 to balance. The tire machine is quick & easy but tire shops would charge you to breath if they could.
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Old 09-21-2011, 11:22 PM
 
2,009 posts, read 2,437,210 times
Reputation: 1919
I see Harbor Freight sells a India made bead breaker wedge for only a few dollars so there you go. Just can't get any easier than that.
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Old 09-22-2011, 12:21 AM
 
158 posts, read 312,743 times
Reputation: 70
If u want the rims, do NOT remove the valve core (that lil stem u fill ur tires through w/ air)...its pretty expensive to replace those.

FIRST: diflate the tires, get as much air out of them as u can, it'll help u break the bead bc there won't be so much pressure inside.

Then, just get a prybar, get it under the rim to get leverage, push down on the tire to separate the bead from the rim, in 3-4 spots until its separated, do that on each side of the tire. Then take that prybar, try to hook it on the inside of the tire under the rim, guide it over the rim, n move the edge of the tire over the rim in circle, u'll get one side off, u can slip the other over the same side.
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