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Old Yesterday, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,571 posts, read 43,338,659 times
Reputation: 11818

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Thanks I purchased the car recently so this is reassuring that it may just be my driving (a very fixable problem as opposed to an issue with the car.) I'll take this thing to a parking lot and start practicing!

Ideally you find a good tutor to show you how to do it. If you *never* stall the car, you are slipping the clutch too much.



This is very hard to explain over the internet. It's more of a Zen idea of "being one with the machine" that it seems to me some people just can't get.


Also, use your head and plan out. Don't get into positions where you have to climb steep hills while slipping the clutch. On an uphill start, use the hand brake so the car does not roll back as you engage the clutch.
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Old Yesterday, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,684 posts, read 15,624,474 times
Reputation: 11500
Really depends on the vehicle......easing into is best most of the time.
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Old Yesterday, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
6,642 posts, read 8,799,494 times
Reputation: 6240
Every vehicle is different and you will learn the least amount of rpm needed. Concerning the smell-- you are riding the clutch and burning it. There are only two positions for a clutch. Fully engaged, foot off or fully pressed disengaged.
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Old Yesterday, 10:02 PM
 
10,623 posts, read 7,744,357 times
Reputation: 18841
Default How much throttle is too much to give a clutch to properly start moving in first gear or reverse?

Here. Slide over let me drive and I'll tell you.
(If you smell burning, you're not doing it right.)
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Old Yesterday, 10:12 PM
 
16,999 posts, read 18,206,975 times
Reputation: 24510
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Mine emits a very strong burning smell if I give it 2k rpms of gas or more while releasing the clutch to start moving. Generally I get it going at lower rpms unless I'm backing up into a steep driveway, etc. Never had a manual do this. Wondering if there's something wrong with the car. It's pretty new with low mileage and the clutch was checked out and is said to be good.
I just leave my truck at idle and slowly release the clutch. It grabs pretty quick. 2000 rpm is way too much. You’re burning up your clutch
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Old Today, 01:10 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,120 posts, read 38,099,492 times
Reputation: 21348
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
What do you mean no added gas? Does one not need to press on the accelerator to start moving?
this works BEST with a diesel!

300,000 - 500,000mi on original clutch

2,000rpm and a slipping clutch = very damaging!
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Old Today, 02:45 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,616 posts, read 15,342,270 times
Reputation: 12173
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
What do you mean no added gas? Does one not need to press on the accelerator to start moving?
Need to? Generally no. Small engine + AWD can be a bit hard to get off the line without touching the gas. It's just faster. More gas, less slip time. Less gas, more slip time.

Everything depends on the vehicle. On my Accord or Mazda3 which had light clutches with very progressive engagement, you really didn't need much gas at all to get going from a normal stop. Usually I'd give it a bit, around 1,200 rpm worked well for a smooth start. The S2000 needed a little more because the clutch was heavier and grabbed a lot harder. You'd get some chatter and bucking if you tried to take off with no gas, although it wasn't hard to do. Just not ideal. The GSX, not possible. But that was modified with a six puck disc which are basically on/off switches. They're not possible to launch smoothly and need significant throttle or the engine will just stall.

If you're smelling your clutch burning it's either because you're using WAY too much gas for how slowly you're engaging the clutch or the thing is just shot necessitating said way too much gas. Put in in fourth or fifth gear at lower cruising RPM and nail the throttle. If the RPM goes up while the car doesn't do much accelerating, clutch is well past time for replacement. If that's happening then even with the clutch fully out there's just not enough friction on the plate left to transfer the power from the engine to the gearbox. Time for a new clutch.

Last edited by Malloric; Today at 02:57 AM..
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Old Today, 03:22 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,025 posts, read 731,092 times
Reputation: 4111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Need to? Generally no. Small engine + AWD can be a bit hard to get off the line without touching the gas. It's just faster. More gas, less slip time. Less gas, more slip time.

Everything depends on the vehicle. On my Accord or Mazda3 which had light clutches with very progressive engagement, you really didn't need much gas at all to get going.

Good concise summary--- there's a delicate ballet that plays out between the engine torque capabilities, the strength of the clutch spring plate and the rpm's-- vehicle are designed to keep the engine & clutch strength tuned-- no sense in teaming a heavy clutch with a weak engine or vice versa.


It's not usually the friction disk wearing out that ruins the clutch and causes it to slip, but wear on the clutch spring plate. There's only so many shifts in a spring plate before it gets too weak to hold the friction plate tight against the fly wheel, but worse, is holding the clutch pedal down for prolonged periods.


Each time the clutch pedal is let out, there's a period of time when it's partially depressed, allowing the friction disc to be in light contact with the fly wheel and "slipping." The ratio of engine rpm's to time spent in that partial contact situation determines whether you stall it or not, or put excessive wear on the disc.


Fast pedal actuation & rpm's too low = stall; hi rpm's & slow actuation time = wear on the friction disc.
Gotta find the Goldilocks spot.


If this is the OP's 3rd car with manual tranny, he must know, more or less how to do it. If he smells burning cork uniquely to this vehicle, it could be that the spring plate is about to poop out (excessive slippage) or just a ventilation problem.
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Old Today, 05:30 AM
 
12,067 posts, read 6,267,421 times
Reputation: 22149
I learned to drive in a 1957 Willy’s utility wagon. Heavy and very little horsepower. On a hill start, you had to give it a lot of throttle. My next door neighbor at my Vermont condo has an older Wrangler in the driveway. I move it for the plow guy quite a bit. It takes a lot of throttle to get it rolling in 4wd.

I had a couple of chipped 200+ hp VW GTIs as daily drivers. Light car and good low end torque for a small 4 cylinder turbo. You barely needed to touch the throttle.
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Old Today, 07:14 AM
 
9,569 posts, read 11,453,681 times
Reputation: 12876
You need to look at the redline on the dash......the tachometer is the needle that moves when you rev the motor. Most cars show yellow and then red as the tach gets to the top. Best way is to rev it up to where the yellow meets the red and then let the clutch go! Be sure the traction control is off for best results!
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