U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old Today, 08:56 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
55,262 posts, read 39,058,600 times
Reputation: 27489

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Mine emits a very strong burning smell if I give it 2k rpms of gas or more while releasing the clutch to start moving. Generally I get it going at lower rpms unless I'm backing up into a steep driveway, etc. Never had a manual do this. Wondering if there's something wrong with the car. It's pretty new with low mileage and the clutch was checked out and is said to be good.

Clutch or rubber?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
16,518 posts, read 10,143,447 times
Reputation: 35793
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
Ok thanks for the answers. The car idles around 1k (maybe 1.3 rpms when initially starting on a cold morning but goes down to 1k rpms after warming up). So revving to about 1.5 rpms appears to the sweet spot. 2k rpms (a touch more gas essentially) produces the strong smell which is what seems odd. I've owned two other manual vehicles; never experienced a burning smell on either after years of driving both. Both idled around 1k rpms.


After reading that you have owned two other stick shift cars, I suspect that you kinda know how to release the clutch, so something else might be going on. Maybe a mechanical issue with your current car.

I would have a mechanic ride with you while you start out, and see if you can replicate the problem for him and get his opinion. If you do not have a mechanic, maybe a knowledgeable relative or friend who knows cars can help.

When I read your first post, I thought you were a novice to stick shifts and was frying the clutch, but now that I see that you have owned other stick cars, that might not be the case.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 12:37 PM
 
1,848 posts, read 440,349 times
Reputation: 2112
Try learning by doing this test. Get yourself into an empty parking lot or desolate street and just crawl - no throttle - in first gear. Very lightly apply the brakes until you feel the engine fighting the brakes and wanting to stall if you push harder. This speed (should be just a few MPH) is all you need before you can be completely out of the clutch. It shouldn't take but about 1 second from when you begin to let out and start applying throttle to being completely out of it. If you consistently go 2-3 seconds at each takeoff, you're gonna smell clutch and drastically decrease the lifespan.

Learn exactly where your clutch starts to grab when you let out. Chances are, if your left leg is still sore after extensive city driving, you're trying to let it out too slowly to be a "smooth driver". You can balance the smoothness of your release with how deep you dig into the throttle, too. It's not all clutch.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 01:01 PM
 
1,002 posts, read 956,124 times
Reputation: 1224
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Try learning by doing this test. Get yourself into an empty parking lot or desolate street and just crawl - no throttle - in first gear. Very lightly apply the brakes until you feel the engine fighting the brakes and wanting to stall if you push harder. This speed (should be just a few MPH) is all you need before you can be completely out of the clutch. It shouldn't take but about 1 second from when you begin to let out and start applying throttle to being completely out of it. If you consistently go 2-3 seconds at each takeoff, you're gonna smell clutch and drastically decrease the lifespan.

Learn exactly where your clutch starts to grab when you let out. Chances are, if your left leg is still sore after extensive city driving, you're trying to let it out too slowly to be a "smooth driver". You can balance the smoothness of your release with how deep you dig into the throttle, too. It's not all clutch.
ddm2K is right. What you ought to do is determine the "friction point," which is the point where the car should start moving. Every car is different, but they will all have a point in which the transmission is engaged and starts to move the vehicle. To accelerate smoothly you would want to lightly press the accelerator a millisecond before the friction point. You may also want to look into rev-matching on both the up and downshifts. If you anticipate where the engine speed will be after you change gears, try matching the throttle position as you release the clutch. Clearly it will be easier to rev-match while upshifting than downshifting, but both take some practice.

Hands-down the easiest manual to drive has been my MK4 VW Golf TDI. It idles at 914rpm has a bunch on low-end torque with relatively tall gearing (redline is 4,600rpm). I got 250K miles out of the original clutch before two fingers on the pressure plate broke off. The disk still had 50% friction material on it when I had it swapped.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 01:53 PM
 
1,848 posts, read 440,349 times
Reputation: 2112
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwong7 View Post
ddm2K is right. What you ought to do is determine the "friction point," which is the point where the car should start moving. Every car is different, but they will all have a point in which the transmission is engaged and starts to move the vehicle. To accelerate smoothly you would want to lightly press the accelerator a millisecond before the friction point. You may also want to look into rev-matching on both the up and downshifts. If you anticipate where the engine speed will be after you change gears, try matching the throttle position as you release the clutch. Clearly it will be easier to rev-match while upshifting than downshifting, but both take some practice.

Hands-down the easiest manual to drive has been my MK4 VW Golf TDI. It idles at 914rpm has a bunch on low-end torque with relatively tall gearing (redline is 4,600rpm). I got 250K miles out of the original clutch before two fingers on the pressure plate broke off. The disk still had 50% friction material on it when I had it swapped.
This is key for an excellent beginner's car. My first manual was a 2004 Dodge Ram SRT10, that had so much torque that it was darn near impossible to stall it out. The large displacement (8.3L) didn't want to be stopped! I didn't drive it fast, I loved it for the sound and the low end that just pulls you away.

Others may be able to explain it better, but a diesel is a great idea for a manual as they produce so much torque that they're harder to stall. It's got the low end without being as dangerous as a sports car for someone still honing their skills on a manual.

Also helps to learn whether your vehicle has a cable-operated throttle or is drive-by-wire. The delay in electronics actuating the butterfly in the throttle body can give you a false sense that you're "giving it gas" before you really are. I've seen drive-by-wire cars have between 0.5s (light throttle) and 1s (WOT) delay prior to the vehicle responding.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 04:28 PM
 
300 posts, read 72,545 times
Reputation: 929
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
….Also helps to learn whether your vehicle has a cable-operated throttle or is drive-by-wire. The delay in electronics actuating the butterfly in the throttle body can give you a false sense that you're "giving it gas" before you really are. I've seen drive-by-wire cars have between 0.5s (light throttle) and 1s (WOT) delay prior to the vehicle responding.
I was thinking the same thing, could the OP have a cable-operated or hydraulic clutch that needs to be adjusted? If so, I would think he would be able to detect slippage after engagement, the suggestion to put the car in a higher gear, then hit the accelerator to see if slippage occurs, is likely prudent. Also, there should be a "dead band" of at least an inch or so of initial pedal travel (you push on the pedal and for the first inch of travel it does not affect clutch engagement, it's effectively "free play"). The same thing should exist at the bottom of pedal travel.

As stated above, you want to use the minimum rpm possible to get the car moving without stalling the engine, and the engagement process should only take one-to-two seconds depending on road conditions. If the odor persists, I'd probably ask a mechanic before you burn something up.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 04:32 PM
 
16,999 posts, read 18,206,975 times
Reputation: 24510
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxthinkpinkxo View Post
What do you mean no added gas? Does one not need to press on the accelerator to start moving?
No. You don’t.

The flywheel moves with the engine. It’s always moving as long as the vehicle is running. Your clutch is the “disconnect/connect” switch between the engine/flywheel and the transmission.

If you slowly release the clutch you’ll feel the point of travel where it starts “grabbing”. Once you know that point practice it and muscle memory will retain it. But you can get a standard shift vehicle moving without having to rev the crap out of it
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top