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Old 01-07-2019, 02:57 AM
 
Location: Poland
1 posts, read 200 times
Reputation: 10

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I've got this car from my father because it's still in very good condition without rust, low mileage and it's look for me is immortal. It's from 1996. I hope I will never have to sell it and keep it in good shape and hand it over to my children


Last edited by eziothekilla34; 01-07-2019 at 03:06 AM..

 
Old 01-07-2019, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Sugarland
13,740 posts, read 12,628,173 times
Reputation: 16579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stockyman View Post
So work is fairly close and I don't do a lot of driving outside of work. I average 10,000KM a year. My car is 2003 and I'm pretty sure I can drive it for another 5 years. No major problems yet knock on wood.

Just wondering who still drives a car at least 20 years old. I can imagine for those who don't average a lot of mileage a year like me they still might have a vehicle from the 90's.
I only drive about 5,000 miles per year and I kept my last car for 10 years before getting a new one. I think I'll probably do the same with my current car (which is 2 years old) unless some great new car feature that I just have to have comes out before the 10 year mark.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Maryland
473 posts, read 91,149 times
Reputation: 829
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
While you're to be commended for your computer-skills, let's air a few concerns:

1. Your point about troubleshooting applies to sensor-failure, electronic signals gone awry and so forth. It does little for conventional mechanical failure, which still happens.
And conventional mechanical failure is diagnosed and fixed in EXACTLY THE SAME WAY. Jesus, it's not that hard.

Quote:
2. Fixing mechanical problems involves removing components that are in the way, to gain access... and then removing the components in question. The more complex the car, the more stuff there is to remove. So even if your computer-tools tell you exactly what to do, there's more work involved, just to reach say the starter or the alternator.
Want a little cheese with that whine? It's not that difficult. And people do it all the time.

Quote:
3. With interconnected systems, modifications are more difficult. For example, the traction control system might have a secondary throttle-body in the intake tract. It works together with the antilock brakes. You can remove this secondary throttle-body and thus gain power by removing the restriction (even with the throttle blade open, there's a pressure-loss in the flowpath), but unless you're really clever and "fool" the system, you'll also impede the function of the antilock brakes. Example: BMW E36 M3.
Your example is bad, people mod E36 M3s (and the newer E46 M3s) all the time. including engine swaps and mods for more power. The US E36 M3 has a neutered engine compared to the Euro version, but people easily make as much power as the Euro ones with a few simple mods OR a swap to the Euro spec engine. We do that with the E46s as well (like my E46 330Ci ZHP).

Quote:
4. You're limited to what the factory allowed you to change. That may be large for a performance-model like say a Camaro or a Mustang, but far less for a quotidian commuter-car. Example: My girlfriend's Chevy Cruze has OK power for passing on the highway, but has an annoying throttle-by-wire delay off of the line. How to defeat it, to tighten up the throttle response? Internet says: "You're [crap] out of luck".
Well, let's look at this logically, your GF bought a commuter appliance, why mod it to start with? Should have bought the right tool for the job if you don't like the "annoying delay." But, you can actually mod that throttle delay with a box like the Sprint Booster that has 19 user definable settings for that delay and throttle pedal response. If there's a market for it, the aftermarket will step up, even now.

Quote:
5. Suppose that you wish to make a major modification, such as swapping engines? In an older car, it's already a challenge, but doable. In a newer car, I can't begin to imagine the cascade of parts and programs that would have to be revised.
And yet it's done regularly, especially using factory crate motors like the Coyote 5.0 and Hellcat Hemi. But these days, you don't need to swap for more performance in most cases, as it's generally a tune away. Considering in the old days you were swapping if you wanted to get real power out of a car (like getting 400 hp out of my RX7 meant a huge turbo setup or a swap to a V8, which is what I did). These days, even basic family sedans have 300 hp, and performance cars have 400-700 hp from the factory. You want a performance car, you can buy one that has more power than those old muscle cars ever had. WITH a warranty. And you can tune them with a computer program that changes the fuel mapping, spark advance and timing to get much more power. Especially if the cars are already turbocharged or supercharged from the factory, which most are now.

Quote:
6. What if take your car to the race-track, and the accident-avoidance system emails home-base, saying that you're driving dangerously, voiding your warranty?
Doesn't work that way. Seriously.

Quote:
7. What if your car insists on rebooting (after receiving a software upgrade overnight)?
Teslas are the only cars that get OTA software updates. No one else does overnight software updates. So again, doesn't work that way.

This speaks to Ziggy's point on ignorance. it's just ignorance and fear that keep people spouting this stuff.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 06:57 AM
 
7,894 posts, read 3,141,854 times
Reputation: 5391
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHughesa View Post
My F-150 is 15 yrs old. At 260k it still runs and is safe. If you think that is lame you can kiss it...

It seems some people don't like it if you drive an old car. They want to make out like you are dumb for it and missing out.

I have saved a lot of money holding my car this long. I paid it off in three years. After the 150k mark there wasn't any expensive repairs.

My grandpa died at 85 and grandma at 88....driving around in carcinogenic cars, lol. Not sure what we did before adaptive cruise control, lol

I bought a new car last month. I kept my truck. It is wonderful because not only does it still run but I don't worry about scratches, and other minute things like I do with the new one.
I donít care if anybody owns an old car, but I donít think itís really anything to brag about either.
I think I cars are the only objects people seem to want to brag about for keeping forever. You never hear about anybody bragging about having old clothes or TVís for 20 years.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 06:59 AM
 
7,894 posts, read 3,141,854 times
Reputation: 5391
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiero2 View Post
Fixed that for ya.

Current primary vehicle = 1995 Camry, now at 334k miles and still ticking.
But youíre driving a 1995 Camry.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,510 posts, read 8,993,945 times
Reputation: 4994
Have a heavily modified 2001 Camaro. Build date was August of 2000, so it'll be 19 years old later this year. It's my Sunday driver. Never drive it in the rain or snow, dry weather only. 147k miles
 
Old 01-07-2019, 07:19 AM
 
7,894 posts, read 3,141,854 times
Reputation: 5391
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
While you're to be commended for your computer-skills, let's air a few concerns:

1. Your point about troubleshooting applies to sensor-failure, electronic signals gone awry and so forth. It does little for conventional mechanical failure, which still happens.

2. Fixing mechanical problems involves removing components that are in the way, to gain access... and then removing the components in question. The more complex the car, the more stuff there is to remove. So even if your computer-tools tell you exactly what to do, there's more work involved, just to reach say the starter or the alternator.

3. With interconnected systems, modifications are more difficult. For example, the traction control system might have a secondary throttle-body in the intake tract. It works together with the antilock brakes. You can remove this secondary throttle-body and thus gain power by removing the restriction (even with the throttle blade open, there's a pressure-loss in the flowpath), but unless you're really clever and "fool" the system, you'll also impede the function of the antilock brakes. Example: BMW E36 M3.

4. You're limited to what the factory allowed you to change. That may be large for a performance-model like say a Camaro or a Mustang, but far less for a quotidian commuter-car. Example: My girlfriend's Chevy Cruze has OK power for passing on the highway, but has an annoying throttle-by-wire delay off of the line. How to defeat it, to tighten up the throttle response? Internet says: "You're [crap] out of luck".

5. Suppose that you wish to make a major modification, such as swapping engines? In an older car, it's already a challenge, but doable. In a newer car, I can't begin to imagine the cascade of parts and programs that would have to be revised.

6. What if take your car to the race-track, and the accident-avoidance system emails home-base, saying that you're driving dangerously, voiding your warranty?

7. What if your car insists on rebooting (after receiving a software upgrade overnight)?
1) Mechanical failures are at an all time low. It’s not because of computers, but improvements in manufacturing and quality in general.

2) complexity is actually simpler and there’s no more effort to remove a starter from a modern car than an old one. Canbus means much fewer wires and a more modular layout. It’s all plug and play.

3) it’s actually easier. I can make a loping cam sound at idle with a “ghost cam” tune. Then flash it back for warranty work. I can use a tune that allows me to take advantage of 93 octane without opening the hood.

4) the more popular the car the more options are available. There’s no way I’d own a Chevy Cruze and if I did, that’s what test drives are for.

5) not really. Swapping an engine is no different than it used to be. Check out a car show sometime. Plenty of resto rods with old muscle cars with modern engines in them. For Jeep’s, you can swap out the gears and just program your new shift maps for the transmission and adjust your speedometer. Back in the day you just dealt with it.

6) Your dealer won’t be able to use it against you without your consent since essentially wiretapping. Your insurance company may offer to lower your insurance bill if you submit to gps tracking, but that goes off your phone not the car. Either way it’s 100% under your control.

7) most cars don’t have over the air software updates and if they do, they have a software patch just like your home computer. Car ECU’s are much simpler in terms of logic than a home PC. There’s no graphical interface or third party antivirus and programs messing with its core function. It’s just basic inputs and outputs.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 07:29 AM
 
7,894 posts, read 3,141,854 times
Reputation: 5391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Bell View Post
Every thing the owner of a Tandy needs it to do. A computer is a (huge) calculating machine. Over the years it has been transformed into (by way of math) to function (put the key into the ignition and it just drives) as entertainment, as well. I have a trash 80. The person who gave it to me has a masters in mathematics. He demonstrated its mathematical capabilities by writing to it a quick computation code and it begin to compute. While it ran he said, "this is why I don't play the lottery". He programed it to stop compiling at certain intervals. Darn thing kept going, non stop. Most awesome site I ever saw and most certainly something I've never been able to make it do. Just because I can not get the trash 80 to function as he did, does not decrease its value for someone who can. (never under estimate anyone, that's just crazy)

I had a 1982 Chrysler Cordoba (beauty is in the eye of the beholder) with a simulated convertible top ( i drove it for 20 years) and only a limited number were made and sold. (before the internet, there was something called letter writing, I wanted to know what I had; so I wrote a letter and got a response) My exhusband, mechanic for many years, he always had to tinker with the timing and me, wishing he would leave it alone. It would drive different for a bit, but then it would go back to the same feel it had before. (i loved it) I asked some one else about this. That some one said, your exhusband doesn't know there is a chip in it. In order for him to reset the timing, he has to first disable the computer. lol

I could go through a list, rather lengthy list of cars (dodge 318s loved e'm) of cars I have driven over the years. What they all have in common (beside that 82 little bug in it) no computer. I could tell by the noise it made and be relatively close most of the time, what was wrong with it. Patterns emerge and after repeat so many times, it isn't rocket science. Even though I don't turn a wrench, I do love to learn, so I listen to those who do the work, how they troubleshoot and evaluate and I learn new things. If I listen to the car, it too, will tell me things. It's when I don't listen I get into trouble with it.

Knowing this, car makers have put in greater dummy controls. (I listen to car shows from time-to-time so I know this happens) Some times those computers will lead a mechanic far away from the actual problem itself. (software is only going to take that troubleshoot, so far) My 1987 Mazda RX7, if it needs a spark plug change, the darn thing isn't going to start and I don't have to wonder why that is, I already know.

It has safe guards from, dummy owner, that there is no way in the world, I can kill that car. It tells me long before there is a problem, there is a problem. I love the car, hate the buzzer. A sound that would wake the dead and enduring that for any length of time will drive the driver mad. With that said ...
I wish I had a dollar for every new car owner that walked into the parts store I use to work at, that thought the very same thing. I'd have a nicer portfolio than I do at the present. Many of 'em had to go to the dealership (the right to repair act) and pay labor, just to change a damn light bulb. Thank you, no.

If an emp hit, I'd still be able to start my car, but I'd be hard pressed to get through the mounds of (stalled out cars and trucks) steal, between my house and the store, though. For all the freedom we thought we had for over the road driving, the computer came into it, with a, not so fast ... you only think.

Some one else (liken to the trash 80) can take a 1987 Mazda RX7 and make it do things, I can only dream of and you know what, knowing that make me like the car even more, with a, I wish I could afford to park it ...

Old car enthusiast (even the young ones) never die, some go on to acquire more. A person doesn't need to understand it, they don't even need to have a taste for it, but just know the automotive industry appreciates it, as well as all those employed that help keep it alive.

If I had a 67 Shelby or a 64 1/2 Mustang, I'd think I had died and gone to heaven. But maybe that's just me.
Thereís nothing a Tandy can do that a modern computer canít, hence they no longer make them.

You have a lot of cool anectdotss, but the overlying theme is ignorance. If a computer technician can not fix a tractor itís not because the tractor is complicated, itís becauze the computer technician isnít a diesel mechanic. You grow with the times.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,403 posts, read 62,629,831 times
Reputation: 30150
I have a 1973 Jensen Healey for fun.

My wife has a 1996 Lincoln Mark VIII as a back up car (our daughter is currently driving the Lincoln because her 2006 Volvo is having an endless slew of problems and is down more than operable).

We also have my sons 1989 Thunderbird Supercoupe that he left in our driveway when he moved 1500 miles away, but it is broken (blown head gasket) and we are trying to figure out the best way to get rid of it (fix and sell or sell as is).
 
Old 01-07-2019, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,882 posts, read 3,554,032 times
Reputation: 7153
So far our son in college is driving my wife's old 2005 Explorer. We've replaced quite a few parts, I think all of the wheel bearings, the harmonic balancer, and a few other things but the engine and body are sound. We expect him to drive it thru med school which will put it around 20 years. Only 136k miles so far, so it should make it.
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