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Old Yesterday, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,418 posts, read 1,646,648 times
Reputation: 5776

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Quote:
Originally Posted by z28lt1 View Post
So, there was a trailer in front of you, without lights (because you only saw the reflectors) making a left turn -- on the highway?


It does sound like you have headlight issues, as those of us that have been driving for more than a couple of years have all had non LED headlights with low beams, and don't go around running into things from behind. In my state the inspect the brightness and aim of the headlights at the annual safety inspection (although some do that better than others). Yours may be dulled from the lens hazing or yellowing, or mis-aligned. I suggest you have them checked out.
The trailer had lights, but I saw the reflectors first. I'm not sure the reason for that. I wish I had examined the trailer lights, to figure out if they were bright enough, and functioning correctly, but I didn't. Regardless, I should have seen it sooner.

I drive quite a bit on the highway, and I generally don't go around running into things from behind either. But I'm not sure if that is not just luck. It's not too often that I come across a farm vehicle stopped on the highway in the dark.

Thanks for the suggestion to get the lights checked out. I don't think they are yellowing, or mis-aligned, but I have to do something about the problem.
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Old Yesterday, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,418 posts, read 1,646,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
Sounds like you need to replace the headlights. A lot of older vehicles lenses get cloudy and the lights are less effective than they were as new.
Yeah, I need to do that.
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Old Yesterday, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,349 posts, read 8,426,748 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
My car is a Honda Civic. Here is an example that somebody did of the problem with using low beams. The first image is a pretty good representation of my field of vision when I'm driving with low beams. Except it doesn't seem quite that bright. The second image doesn't even come close to what I can see with my high beams on. I can see much farther ahead, and everything on both sides of the road.
Why is this an issue? Use your high beams when able. Use your low beams when oncoming traffic is approaching. If you fail to dim your lights you should expect the oncoming car to do the same. (Better hope that guy didn't add additional lighting that will burn your retina's )
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Old Yesterday, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
12,699 posts, read 19,238,413 times
Reputation: 7319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
No, I'm not. At 45 mph the stopping distance would be about 150 feet. My low beams illuminate about 1/3 that distance. Low beams are a complete joke.
Yes, you are. Millions have driven safely with stock low beams. However, I do agree they could be made better.
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Old Yesterday, 05:39 PM
 
1,282 posts, read 1,507,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
No, I'm not. At 45 mph the stopping distance would be about 150 feet. My low beams illuminate about 1/3 that distance. Low beams are a complete joke.
**YOUR** low beams on your specific vehicle may be the problem, but in general they are just fine for most night driving. Most states have rules regarding how bright low beams should be and generally speaking the automakers have low beams shine at least 150-feet ahead. Many go beyond that....high beams generally come into play at 300-feet or more.
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Old Today, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,418 posts, read 1,646,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
Why is this an issue? Use your high beams when able. Use your low beams when oncoming traffic is approaching. If you fail to dim your lights you should expect the oncoming car to do the same. (Better hope that guy didn't add additional lighting that will burn your retina's )
That is perfectly fine with me. I'm blinded by the lights either way, high beam or low beam. At least if my lights are on high beam I can see something before I'm completely blinded. I can focus my eyes on the fog line. In that situation it's even more important to have high beams on, because your eyes adjust to the brightness of the head lights, and it's difficult to see the lane markings, with low beam lights.

The issue is that the highways I drive on have a constant flow of traffic. Every time I flip my lights to high beam, 5 seconds later another car comes around the bend or over the hill. Most of the time I just give up and keep them on low beam. I have to watch the oncoming headlights to alert me to upcoming curves, because I sure can't see them with my low beam lights.
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Old Today, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,579 posts, read 43,363,710 times
Reputation: 11842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
Yeah, I agree it's dumb. I can leave my CD player on and when I start the car up again, it will play right from where it left off. But if I try to leave my lights on I get a beep, beep, beep, telling me to turn them off. It's like they are deliberately trying to make it difficult to drive safe.

I live in an area where daylight headlight use is required. So it's pretty automatic for me to turn my lights on when I start the ignition. Just like putting my seatbelt on. But when I get on the highway, I always double check by trying to turn the switch anyway, to make sure they are on. No matter how careful I am about turning my lights on, once in awhile it clicks, and I realize I didn't have them on.

I wish there was some easy hack to have my lights automatically come on when I start the ignition.

You could buy a Subaru. You can leave the headlight switch on, but when you turn the car off, the headlights go off (and the running lights). To turn the parking lights on, you have a separate switch.


What part of Oregon requires headlights on during the day?
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Old Today, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
4,418 posts, read 1,646,648 times
Reputation: 5776
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
You could buy a Subaru. You can leave the headlight switch on, but when you turn the car off, the headlights go off (and the running lights). To turn the parking lights on, you have a separate switch.


What part of Oregon requires headlights on during the day?
Thanks for the Subaru suggestion. I'm more of a Honda guy, but I'll look into Subaru.

Any section of highway in Oregon that has a crash rate at or above 150 percent of the statewide average, is declared a Safety Corridor and gets "Lights On For Safety" signs and they collect double fines. Because of course they have to create a revenue stream from safety. It usually works pretty good. When the crash rate goes down, they remove the signs and wait for it to go back up. The concept that of it is working, maybe they should keep it, doesn't really exist here. So the Safety Corridors are always moving. It's pretty hard to drive any distance and not travel through at least one Safety Corridor.

Quote:
What is a Safety Corridor?

Safety corridors are stretches of state highways where fatal and serious injury traffic crash rates are higher than the statewide average for similar types of roadways. To reduce the number of these incidents, the stretch of the road is designated as a "safety corridor" and becomes subject to heightened enforcement and double fines for traffic infractions, if signed. Drivers may also be asked to turn on headlights during the day, reduce speed and refrain from passing.
What is a Safety Corridor?
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Old Today, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Lee County, NC
1,081 posts, read 336,059 times
Reputation: 1317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cape Cod Todd View Post
In my state of Mass. we have a new law that states if your wipers are on your lights also have to be on. In many cases it is not dark enough during a rain storm during the day so yes your daytime running lights will be on but your rear lights will not be so you have to turn all the lights on manually.
The headlights come on automatically on my F-150 after a couple of passes of the wipers when you leave the headlights on auto.
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