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Old 01-10-2019, 02:15 PM
Status: "do-si-yay!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Clyde Hill, WA
1,448 posts, read 232,159 times
Reputation: 405

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https://www.eisenhower.archives.gov/...19_convoy.html
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...-us-180956284/
(quotes are from the bio of Ike by Jean Edward Smith)

It's amazing what has changed in 100 years, not much more than the average lifespan of an American. In 1919 the Army decided to try to run a convoy from Washington DC to San Francisco. The army "was not at all certain" that the task could be completed. Most roads were unpaved, and most bridges were inadequate. They brought along their own bridge-building gear. There were 81 vehicles, and about 300 men, who were to travel 3,251 miles.

One of them was a young Lt. Col. Dwight Eisenhower, who later became commander of Allied Forces in WWII, and after that, US President. Ike had been involved in the first Army tank unit.

They did complete the trip, but only with severe trials and tribulations. The average speed was 10-15 MPH. There were no maps, and limited signage, so they sent out motorcycle scouts each day to look for paths forward. Heavy vehicles sank in the sands of Nevada, and had to be laboriously dug out. Mountainous Wyoming was a nightmare.

But it was in Southern WY that young Ike and a co-conspirator decided to have some fun. They somehow convinced others that an attack by Indians might be imminent. Night sentries were posted. Ike and his pal took up concealed positions outside the perimeter, and exchanged "warrior yelps." "They were sufficiently convincing to induce a young officer to discharge his weapon," after which the officer submitted an incident report. Ike escaped formal reprimand only with some difficulty.

Well-wishers and gawkers showed up all along the route. It was estimated that 3.5 million saw the convoy. That would have been about 3% of US population.
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Old 01-10-2019, 02:49 PM
 
Location: San Ramon, Seattle, Anchorage, Reykjavik
1,870 posts, read 787,107 times
Reputation: 2560
That looks like it would have been a fun adventure.
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Old 01-10-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: WA
5,323 posts, read 20,926,916 times
Reputation: 5720
It is no surprise that Eisenhower pushed for the creation of the Interstate Highway System 30 years later.
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Old 01-10-2019, 03:12 PM
Status: "do-si-yay!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Clyde Hill, WA
1,448 posts, read 232,159 times
Reputation: 405
Today those 'warrior yelps' probably would have gotten him booted out of the Army for being racially insensitive. Ike's leadership turned out to be instrumental in winning WWII.
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:09 PM
Status: "do-si-yay!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Clyde Hill, WA
1,448 posts, read 232,159 times
Reputation: 405
Wyoming would have been a breeze with one of these:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZvQtlh6ueM
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Podunk, IA
2,944 posts, read 1,362,357 times
Reputation: 3048
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
It is no surprise that Eisenhower pushed for the creation of the Interstate Highway System 30 years later.
That, plus seeing the Autobahns in Germany.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,946 posts, read 1,069,300 times
Reputation: 5623
I remember reading about Pancho Villa'a attack on Columbus NM. The US army, formed a (first ever) tactical motorized unit, under General Pershing, to chase Villa into Mexico. But first they had to recruit soldiers who knew how to drive the trucks.
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Old Yesterday, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
11,632 posts, read 7,030,136 times
Reputation: 15048
Dwight Eisenhower was a "logistics man"; he wasn't posted to Europe during the First World War -- spent the time stateside expediting men and material; the was a soldier who understood, and early-on, that military campaigns often failed because the supply lines couldn't be maintained, or the advancing troops extended themselves too far.

Long before the United States was drawn into World War II, the feasibility (and limitations) of increased mobility and shorter transit times were demonstrated in the Louisiana Maneuvers of 1941.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Maneuvers

And we'll never know how many casualties were avoided by that restraint and foresight.
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Old Today, 01:54 PM
Status: "In the chilly hours and minutes of uncertainty" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: SF, CA
1,182 posts, read 506,951 times
Reputation: 1738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonepa View Post
That looks like it would have been a fun adventure.
It certainly would have.... but imagine traveling with Lewis and Clark!
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