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Old 01-12-2019, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
16,701 posts, read 10,255,506 times
Reputation: 36094

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTOlover View Post
the thing here people maybe missing is how nice Fox-Body mustangs have been going up in value over the last few years sure no 67 Super Snake but nice 5.0HO LX or GT are getting into the $15K Range.

To Gen X and Y these are the 1955 Chevys of our era and can only see them going up in value as we get older and have middle life crisis wanting to enjoy the fun cars of our youth.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ix3OvNDCP4

We have two Foxes, a 92 Mustang and an 84 Capri. You rarely see a Fox on the streets any more.
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:30 PM
 
Location: SC
8,451 posts, read 5,230,900 times
Reputation: 12206
Collector car values float with the generation currently in the money.

Cars from the 40s and 50s are losing value fast because those who appreciated them when they were young - but couldn't afford them then - are drying out.

In ten years cars from the sixties will start to lose value... because kids from the sixties will be dying out.

The value of "collectibles" will always track with those who were kids then that have money now. The only exception to this is truly special cars, that does not include run of the mill performance cars of any era.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
5,291 posts, read 1,419,633 times
Reputation: 7565
I wouldn't spend $2 million on any mustang, but if it's worth more 10 years down the road then the buyer will make a solid return on their investment.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:07 PM
 
26,215 posts, read 50,613,159 times
Reputation: 19836
Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post
Collector car values float with the generation currently in the money.

Cars from the 40s and 50s are losing value fast because those who appreciated them when they were young - but couldn't afford them then - are drying out.

In ten years cars from the sixties will start to lose value... because kids from the sixties will be dying out.

The value of "collectibles" will always track with those who were kids then that have money now. The only exception to this is truly special cars, that does not include run of the mill performance cars of any era.
Yes and no... there are many examples of cars standing the test of time...

Not many left that remember Model T from their youth but the Model T Club is still around... going back farther the Horseless Carriage Club has quite a dedicated following.

One consideration is the cost of restoration... which continues to be more and more expensive... pure labor and materials... things like paint, chrome, etc... can become very costly.

I always wanted a Curved Dash Oldsmobile... really a buggy with a motor... and I certainly wasn't buying cars when these came out nor where my parents, grandparents... etc.

The hobby has been very kind to me...
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:56 PM
 
7,067 posts, read 4,602,065 times
Reputation: 12386
Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post
Collector car values float with the generation currently in the money.

Cars from the 40s and 50s are losing value fast because those who appreciated them when they were young - but couldn't afford them then - are drying out.

In ten years cars from the sixties will start to lose value... because kids from the sixties will be dying out.

The value of "collectibles" will always track with those who were kids then that have money now. The only exception to this is truly special cars, that does not include run of the mill performance cars of any era.
This is possible, but by one way of reckoning, the 60s were a pinnacle of automotive design, performance and visceral appeal. Cars from the 60s might remain prized and valuable centuries from now, long after the last drop of petrolium has been exhausted, and cars become as rare and dated as Medieval armor.
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Old 01-13-2019, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Podunk, IA
2,964 posts, read 1,369,021 times
Reputation: 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
This is possible, but by one way of reckoning, the 60s were a pinnacle of automotive design, performance and visceral appeal.
IMO, the late '50's through the 60's will continue to do well.

It's be interesting to see what happens with 70's and 80's cars. They're gaining interest.
Those still have minimal electronics, so you don't have to be an electrical engineer to fiddle with them.

Newer than that could become problematic as they age.
We could see many more cars become extinct, something that rarely happens with pre-electronic cars.
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Old 01-14-2019, 06:55 AM
 
9,611 posts, read 11,513,750 times
Reputation: 12910
Quote:
Originally Posted by eaton53 View Post
IMO, the late '50's through the 60's will continue to do well.

It's be interesting to see what happens with 70's and 80's cars. They're gaining interest.
Those still have minimal electronics, so you don't have to be an electrical engineer to fiddle with them.

Newer than that could become problematic as they age.
We could see many more cars become extinct, something that rarely happens with pre-electronic cars.
Remember cars tend to age out of popularity with the people that like them. For grandpa the t-buckets were all the rage, then the next generation loved the 32 Fords, then the next group liked the 55-57 Chevys.

T buckets are worthless right now. 32 Fords don't sell fast like they used to. Their buyers are getting older and not buying/building them anymore.
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Old 01-14-2019, 06:59 AM
 
9,611 posts, read 11,513,750 times
Reputation: 12910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
I wouldn't spend $2 million on any mustang, but if it's worth more 10 years down the road then the buyer will make a solid return on their investment.
Not true........if it is worth 2.1mm in 10 years then they lost money (auction transaction costs). If they get 2.3mm then they made less than 10% on 2mm over 10 years (1% a year, heck CD's beat that now). Next up you need to maintain it, insure it and store it somewhere......all eroding your "profits"

I wouldn't spend 2mm on a dozen cars and I like cars! At some point the "collection" becomes a hassle.
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Old 01-14-2019, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,039 posts, read 9,383,277 times
Reputation: 12610
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4g4m View Post
If you were to spend $2 million on a car, would you spend it on a Mustang?
If I had the money, yes, I would spend it on that Mustang to add it to my collection.


I'm a big mustang fan, but more for the 80's and 90's models when I was growing up. I still have a love for the 60's models, but if I were to invest in a Mustang now, it would be a clean, low mileage 93 Cobra, or Fox Saleen.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:20 AM
 
26,215 posts, read 50,613,159 times
Reputation: 19836
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Remember cars tend to age out of popularity with the people that like them. For grandpa the t-buckets were all the rage, then the next generation loved the 32 Fords, then the next group liked the 55-57 Chevys.

T buckets are worthless right now. 32 Fords don't sell fast like they used to. Their buyers are getting older and not buying/building them anymore.
I have several Model T and A restored... none is worth less than I have and several of the Speedsters have appreciated nicely...

This past weekend I had a guy over that added up what it will cost to restore a Speedster like mine and he made me a very nice offer... don't think I will sell as I enjoy the car myself...
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