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Old 01-16-2019, 02:56 AM
 
12,227 posts, read 6,360,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
No. Just stay in the car once you get in and wrap yourself in foil. You may spontaneously combust, and that may ignite the fuel being pumped into the vehicle. Not likely if you are inside your vehicle, and wrapped in foil, but very likely if you are standing there holding the pump like a #*%^#&*q.
Itís the arc from the cell phone to your tin foil hat that is the big fire risk.

I turn the car off unless itís extreme cold weather like -20F where gasoline isnít going to vaporize anyways. In the universe of car risks, Iím far more likely to get killed by a distracted driver on a cell phone than refueling a running car.
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Old 01-17-2019, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,344 posts, read 60,717,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Itís the arc from the cell phone to your tin foil hat that is the big fire risk.

I turn the car off unless itís extreme cold weather like -20F where gasoline isnít going to vaporize anyways. In the universe of car risks, Iím far more likely to get killed by a distracted driver on a cell phone than refueling a running car.
You are a tough one. 20 with wind is enough to drive me back into my truck (except right now there is no point because the heater does not work - except if it is very windy, at least I can get out of the wind).

Many of the gas stations, the pumps pump incredibly slowly when it is super cold out. Sometimes it can take five times as long to fill up when it is cold. Anyone know why?
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Old 01-17-2019, 01:00 PM
 
3,805 posts, read 1,982,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
You are a tough one. 20 with wind is enough to drive me back into my truck (except right now there is no point because the heater does not work - except if it is very windy, at least I can get out of the wind).

Many of the gas stations, the pumps pump incredibly slowly when it is super cold out. Sometimes it can take five times as long to fill up when it is cold. Anyone know why?
It's probably not slow but you perceive as such since you want out of the cold.

It may also be that since it's cold, the filter used in the dispenser hasn't been changed and it's clogging.
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Old 01-17-2019, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,752 posts, read 1,565,131 times
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I wonder how many of the he-man, scofflaw types here who are too wussy to let the interior of their truck cool down while they fill up have considered that, as the absolutely universal law, regulation, recommended practice and good idea of shutting your car off is, should there be any incident, they would have almost zero liability defense. Even if it's just your trusty F-150 that burns up, your insurance company could well decline or limit any payoff.

But by all means, keep them seats warm, buckaroos.
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Old 01-17-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,344 posts, read 60,717,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I wonder how many of the he-man, scofflaw types here who are too wussy to let the interior of their truck cool down while they fill up have considered that, as the absolutely universal law, regulation, recommended practice and good idea of shutting your car off is, should there be any incident, they would have almost zero liability defense. Even if it's just your trusty F-150 that burns up, your insurance company could well decline or limit any payoff.

But by all means, keep them seats warm, buckaroos.
No. but then I do not run around worrying about getting hit by lightening again. Nor do I take measure to repel an invasion of my hometown by the Canadians. Also I pull over and pull people out of ditches which is technically illegal and conceptually dangerous because someone might come along and drift over onto the shoulder and hit me while I am doing it. All of these things are more likely to get me hurt or killed than leaving a turck running while filling.

Also I employ this thing called logic. It is fun, you should try it. Applying logic i realize leaving my truck running while filling is nor more likely to cause an explsion than having a car running twelve to eighteen inches away from my gas tank as they arrive and leave form the gas station, and far far less likey to cause an explosion tan triggering the starter motor (which Sparks! ) the fact is there is virtually no risk whatsoever.

I am not one of those people who blindly follow rules without considering whether there is any sense to the rule. or without considering whether the rule actually makes you less safe. Sometimes rule are based on a lack of complete reasoning. Other times they are based on outright lies. Remember when they told us you cannot use your cell phone on airplanes because it would mess up the pilots instrumentation? Complete fabrication. How about the time they told you it is better to run an open sparky starter next to a gasoline pump than it is to leave a car running which produces no unconstrained spark whatsoever? Want another dozen examples of rules based on fabrications or gross exaggerations?

I have an experiment you can try. On a dark night, turn off all the lights in and around your car. poke your hear underneath or under the hood to where you can see the starter. Have someone crank the starter. See those little blue flashes? Those are fire. Fire right out int eh open where the gas fumes might be if someone spilled twenty gallons of gas on the ground at a gas station. Now start your car but keep the lights all of. Stick you head under the hood while it is running (don't get your ponytail caught in the fan or a belt). Do you see any blue flashes? Any flashes at all? No you do not. That is because cars do no make exposed fire like starters do. Now try applying logic. If somehow someone was able to spill enough gasoline to cause an accumulation of vapors which is worse? Sparkey blue fire in the starter but exposed to the outside air, or no fire at all from the running engine?


Go forth Grasshopper practice this logic thing and then return and share what you have learned.


Just don't stand outside your car when you are fueling and risk spontaneously combusting and burning us all up. (Which is about as likely to happen as a running car starting a fire.)

Now I will say if your car is backfiring (sounds like firecrackers or ballons popping coming from your exhaust pipe) please stay the heck away from gas stations. It is not leaving the car running that is dangerous in that situation, it is driving up to the pump and leaving the pump. that is hen you normally get the backfires. Still it is not seriously dangerous, but there is a really unusual set of circumstances where that could cause a fire if someone spills a lot of gasoline in the right weather conditions.
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Old 01-17-2019, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,752 posts, read 1,565,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
No. but then I do not run around worrying about getting hit by lightening again.
Okay. Good to know.

I find it absolutely hilarious that so many of the brass-balled will defend this practice with spittin', stompin' fury and righteousness, when the ONLY argument in its favor is so their truck cab won't get a bit cool.

Especially in that with many years in Connecticut and now Denver, I can't remember my car interior getting noticeably un-warm while I filled up, even in blustery teens down to zero. Of course, I do remember to close the door. Maybe that's it.
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Old 01-17-2019, 09:11 PM
 
Location: SoCal
2,526 posts, read 2,053,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodburyWoody View Post
So the station did, in fact, have at least one faulty nozzle that did not properly shut down when the filler tube was filled. Perhaps more than one was found to be faulty in the testing, is that correct?
Exactly, I don't see this being his fault as the gas wouldn't have pumped by itself.
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Old Yesterday, 06:25 AM
 
12,227 posts, read 6,360,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I wonder how many of the he-man, scofflaw types here who are too wussy to let the interior of their truck cool down while they fill up have considered that, as the absolutely universal law, regulation, recommended practice and good idea of shutting your car off is, should there be any incident, they would have almost zero liability defense. Even if it's just your trusty F-150 that burns up, your insurance company could well decline or limit any payoff.

But by all means, keep them seats warm, buckaroos.
My insurance company would cover it. I guess I need to put rainbow and COEXIST bumper stickers on the Subaru.

I donít see the risk. The fuel fill for my car is many feet from anything hot enough to ignite gasoline. I shut the car off to refuel unless it is well below zero but leaving the car running isnít going to cause it to burst into flames. Itís not a Pinto.
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Old Yesterday, 06:34 AM
 
12,227 posts, read 6,360,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Especially in that with many years in Connecticut and now Denver, I can't remember my car interior getting noticeably un-warm while I filled up, even in blustery teens down to zero. Of course, I do remember to close the door. Maybe that's it.
The frozen tundra of Connecticut. The banana belt of New England. We bow to your imagined expertise. I work in Denver all the time. I was there a week ago. I donít pack warm clothes for Denver trips. A Patriots sweatshirt and a down vest is fine. All the California transplants are dressed for an Arctic expedition.
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Old Yesterday, 09:13 AM
 
Location: trapped in the body of a dying animal
3,435 posts, read 1,450,541 times
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Static electricity is really the biggest problem here. So IMO the important thing is to lay your healing hand upon the car while inserting the nozzle, and while grabbing it to remove. I've done that just out of habit for years, probably since watching some Youtube videos.

I asked the wife yesterday if she was aware of this and was doing it. She claimed that of course she's aware and that it's obvious. I don't really believe her... but that's not the point. Maybe she'll keep it in mind now
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