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Old 01-23-2019, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,594 posts, read 6,561,024 times
Reputation: 9979

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_RDNC View Post
Car heating can be counter-intuitive.
You want the engine block to heat up as fast as possible, because when it's cold, it doesn't run as smoothly or efficiently or as cleanly. That's what it's thermostat is for. It keeps warming water from going into your heater until the engine is fully hot. Most cars, that happens pretty quickly, (5 minutes?). Once the block is hot, then the engine needs to get rid of the excess heat, and that happens via the radiator, or the heater core, either one.
Actually, the thermostat prevents any coolant from flowing at all until the set point is reached and the thermostat opens. I've replaced more than a few thermostats, it's a cheap part and a relatively easy job.

Most of the thermostats I've seen are set to open at 185*F, although on some occasions I've purchased and installed one that opens at 165* (my choice to replace a 185 with a 165).

Until the coolant temp reaches the thermostat set-point, no coolant flows and there will be no heat. After the thermostat opens, there will be a short delay until the heater core is flushed of cold coolant and it is replaced with hot coolant flowing through it.

If you have an older Jeep Cherokee Sport, like I do, it's still a crapshoot as to whether, when, and how much heat you will get (known issue with this model). I start mine up and go back in the house and make another cup of coffee. If I'm lucky, by the time I get back out there it might be warm enough that I won't have to wear gloves while I'm driving.
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Old 01-23-2019, 06:55 PM
 
37,754 posts, read 39,274,229 times
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The engine block is going to create W BTU's and will lose X BTU's per Y time, W minus X gives you Z(temperature of the water). Assuming W is constant X increases as Z increases. Thus putting X though the heating core will decrease the amount of time required to heat the cabin because some of X is going into the cabin instead of the atmosphere. That said it's probably some irrelevant increase.



As far as the fan goes with the air blowing on you that will make you colder but that's a human condition. Moving air removes more BTU's from exposed skin however it is heating the cabin.




Now I know my ABC's ...

Last edited by thecoalman; 01-23-2019 at 07:07 PM..
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,731 posts, read 2,639,642 times
Reputation: 8346
Install a remote start kit. Start car from in house and let it get toasty warm.
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,348 posts, read 910,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
The engine block is going to create W BTU's and will lose X BTU's per Y time, W minus X gives you Z(temperature of the water). Assuming W is constant X increases as Z increases. Thus putting X though the heating core will decrease the amount of time required to heat the cabin because some of X is going into the cabin instead of the atmosphere. That said it's probably some irrelevant increase.



As far as the fan goes with the air blowing on you that will make you colder but that's a human condition. Moving air removes more BTU's from exposed skin however it is heating the cabin.




Now I know my ABC's ...

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Old 01-23-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,348 posts, read 910,802 times
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Now people are bringing up physics on a car heater
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Old 01-23-2019, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,652 posts, read 43,551,483 times
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Most cars I am familiar with, the engine coolant circulates to the heater core (assuming the heater valve, if one is used, is open) regardless of the main thermostat.


Until the coolant warms up, not fully but say when the temp gauge starts to move, blowing cold outside air through the heater core will just make you colder as the air is moving. Once your temp gauge moves off the lower stop, there will be some heat available. I wouldn't turn the blower up much till the temp gauge is out of the "cold" region.


Not sure why this is a question. You can't get heat from cold coolant.
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Old 01-23-2019, 08:34 PM
 
9,216 posts, read 7,656,923 times
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I work with hospital HVAC systems. If you don’t have auto climate control in your vehicle then put fan speed to low. This will give you a bit of fresh air without blasting freezing cold air into the vehicle. If your vehicle has a temperature gage then monitor it as the vehicle warms up. As you see it rise you can begin to slowly increase your fan speed. The faster you move the air, the less heat transfer happens. With lower temperature engine coolant you’re better to run the fan at slower speeds gradually increasing fan speed as it warms up. The only exception is if your windows are iced over. Some vehicles have a de-ice setting which turns off the compressor and directs the air directly onto the front and side windows. In this case turn the fan on full speed. While it warms up, work on removing excess ice from the windows. You want the temperature change to be slow and gradual to help prevent cracking.
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Old 01-23-2019, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
2,755 posts, read 1,896,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
Actually, the thermostat prevents any coolant from flowing at all until the set point is reached and the thermostat opens. I've replaced more than a few thermostats, it's a cheap part and a relatively easy job.

Most of the thermostats I've seen are set to open at 185*F, although on some occasions I've purchased and installed one that opens at 165* (my choice to replace a 185 with a 165).

Until the coolant temp reaches the thermostat set-point, no coolant flows and there will be no heat. After the thermostat opens, there will be a short delay until the heater core is flushed of cold coolant and it is replaced with hot coolant flowing through it.

If you have an older Jeep Cherokee Sport, like I do, it's still a crapshoot as to whether, when, and how much heat you will get (known issue with this model). I start mine up and go back in the house and make another cup of coffee. If I'm lucky, by the time I get back out there it might be warm enough that I won't have to wear gloves while I'm driving.
Not quite. There is a "built in" bypass that lets coolant flow all the time. Different places and different types on different vehicles.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:04 PM
 
3,039 posts, read 1,315,176 times
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After a -10 degree morning,the process I use involve warming the car up for 10 minutes, crack the sunroof vent,set hvac to 72 with defroster turned on until the temperature stabilizes.

Winter = fresh antifreeze every 2 years + use ac defroster regularly to keep them parts working.
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,348 posts, read 910,802 times
Reputation: 2731
[quote=victimofGM;54233779]I work with hospital HVAC systems. If you don’t have auto climate control in your vehicle then put fan speed to low. This will give you a bit of fresh air without blasting freezing cold air into the vehicle. If your vehicle has a temperature gage then monitor it as the vehicle warms up. As you see it rise you can begin to slowly increase your fan speed. The faster you move the air, the less heat transfer happens. With lower temperature engine coolant you’re better to run the fan at slower speeds gradually increasing fan speed as it warms up. The only exception is if your windows are iced over. Some vehicles have a de-ice setting which turns off the compressor and directs the air directly onto the front and side windows. In this case turn the fan on full speed. While it warms up, work on removing excess ice from the windows. You want the temperature change to be slow and gradual to help prevent cracking.[/QUOTE



A modern car has a ventilation system that provides a constant through-flow of fresh air, heated if necessary. Modern cars are designed to have a constant through-flow of fresh air that keeps the interior atmosphere pleasant even with all the windows shut.
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