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Old 02-08-2019, 03:52 PM
 
8,706 posts, read 7,687,158 times
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The better solution if you live in snow areas, is to live in an area they do not salt the roads.

I like not having to have to worry about salt eating up my car. Spent 16 months in Detroit years ago, and saw my car getting worse all the time, as rust ate it up.

It has been a long time since I have had to worry about salt, eating up my car. Here we have major roads plowed, and with studded snow tires and and 4 wheel drive, we don't thankfully have to worry about sale eating our cars up. Go to any parking lot, and 75% will be Pickups or SUVs. Yes we are way ahead of the trend going all over the country where people are wising up and moving to our type of vehicles.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:00 PM
 
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The guys I know who own plowing and excavating businesses use lanolin on their equipment. The navy has always used it on ships as a corrosion inhibitor. The common brand is called Fluid Film. You pressure wash all your yellow construction equipment in the fall, spray on lanolin, and pressure wash everything again in the spring.


Me? I don't bother. I'm not trying to get 20+ years out of yellow construction equipment. I'm planning to get 10 years out of a car that winters in Vermont. The car is now 4 years old and shows no signs of rust when you put it up on the lift. I have no reason to believe the car won't hang in there until I opt to flip it for a new car.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,470 posts, read 943,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
The better solution if you live in snow areas, is to live in an area they do not salt the roads.

I like not having to have to worry about salt eating up my car. Spent 16 months in Detroit years ago, and saw my car getting worse all the time, as rust ate it up.

It has been a long time since I have had to worry about salt, eating up my car. Here we have major roads plowed, and with studded snow tires and and 4 wheel drive, we don't thankfully have to worry about sale eating our cars up. Go to any parking lot, and 75% will be Pickups or SUVs. Yes we are way ahead of the trend going all over the country where people are wising up and moving to our type of vehicles.
What year was your car when you were in Detroit? Rust protection has changed in the automotive industry.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,470 posts, read 943,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbiz1 View Post
Tell me about it, for the past 3 summers I've been underneath vehicle w/wire attachments and high speed rotary tool. This is followed up w/spray converter, changing the oxide into phosphate.

Wheel well sheet metal down low gets the worst of it, but even the frame near welds was beginning to corrode. Once I removed all the rust, I was tempted to rubber spray undercoat; but didn't want to "seal in" any corrosion I may have missed.
Why can't they use that non-salt silty stuff, tan in color like I see out west?
As opposed to corrosive causing treatments prevalent east of the Mississippi.
What year are your vehicles?
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:16 PM
 
12,500 posts, read 6,503,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easy62 View Post
What year are your vehicles?

My 1972 Ford I had in Vermont was held together with pop rivets, whatever was lying around for sheet metal, and bondo. By 1980, I had stolen road signs for the floor pan, heating duct sheet metal in all the wheel wells and trunk, and beer cans holding the bottom edge of the doors and other various rust thru holes in place.


Today, an 8 year old car isn't going to show much rust.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:48 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,070 posts, read 40,494,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
My 1972 Ford I had in Vermont was held together with pop rivets, whatever was lying around for sheet metal, and bondo. By 1980, I had stolen road signs for the floor pan, heating duct sheet metal in all the wheel wells and trunk, and beer cans holding the bottom edge of the doors and other various rust thru holes in place.


Today, an 8 year old car isn't going to show much rust.
The last sentence needs to be emphasized. A car in the rust/salt belt made anytime from the beginning (I may alter that because salting roads didn't start right away) up through the mid-80s, anyway, would rust away. It wasn't unusual to have frames rotted away at the five year mark, effectively totaling the car.

It's rare now to see cars with any rust at year ten.

I had a 1976 Grand Prix that I got rid of in 1979. The main reason, and some of this was lower door design, was because the rocker panels were starting to rust. And yes, the car was undercoated.

I had a '91 Lumina crushed a couple years ago with 80K on the odometer. It came from PA and had been my mother's who, while real good at washing it, never hosed off underneath. The sub-frame was almost completely gone and the A arms were half the size/mass they should have been.
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Old 02-08-2019, 05:07 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 508,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easy62 View Post
What year are your vehicles?

An 05' GM, parked in the elements all this time; not far from you.
Didn't rust until 10 years in, so not bad. But if I hadn't caught it in time, panels would be rusted through the paint by now.
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Old Yesterday, 10:14 AM
 
12,500 posts, read 6,503,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post

It's rare now to see cars with any rust at year ten.

In Vermont at 10 years, anything done under the car is going to be with a torch, SawzAll, and Easy Outs. It might not have rust-thru issues yet but you're not going to be able to put a wrench on things. A shot of lanolin/fluid film every fall would slow it down some. I've had my indie mechanic yell at me to get rid of the POS when I kept bringing in a 10 year old car to do the usual things like flex brake lines, struts, shocks, and springs that fail at that age. It didn't add much to repair costs but it was a PITA for the mechanic.


If I had access to a lift, I'd at least spray every bolt and anything that showed surface rust with a can of Fluid Film every fall.
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Old Yesterday, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
16,903 posts, read 10,389,272 times
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In the 60's, we lived in salt country, and I knew a guy who saved his old engine oil when he changed it, and then he put the car on a lift every time and sprayed the entire underside with the old oil. The car smelled like Hell, but it didn't have a speck of rust anywhere.

Not saying this is a good idea, just telling an old story.
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Old Today, 04:56 AM
 
2,218 posts, read 1,894,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
In Vermont at 10 years, anything done under the car is going to be with a torch, SawzAll, and Easy Outs. It might not have rust-thru issues yet but you're not going to be able to put a wrench on things. A shot of lanolin/fluid film every fall would slow it down some. I've had my indie mechanic yell at me to get rid of the POS when I kept bringing in a 10 year old car to do the usual things like flex brake lines, struts, shocks, and springs that fail at that age. It didn't add much to repair costs but it was a PITA for the mechanic.


If I had access to a lift, I'd at least spray every bolt and anything that showed surface rust with a can of Fluid Film every fall.
Fluid film is great stuff with many uses.
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