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Old Today, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,983 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
Ok, first-worlder...
Better handling is being able to screeech around corners without sliding off the road SOONER THAN YOU WOULD IF YOUR TIRES WERE INFLATED TO SPECS.

You get a softer, quieter, more fuel efficient ride, and the tires will last longer, if they are inflated to mfg specs. But temps vary and they alter tire pressure so you figure that part out.

ME?
I overinflate by 5 lbs mas o menos here in SOFla, and tire tread be damned!

YEEHAW!!
"Better handling is being able to screeech
around corners without sliding off the road "

Oh really? Well if that's how you drive then it's time to hand over your license.

Like I said, any more than 1-2PSI over door placard, in most cars I've driven not just my Elantra, and the steering becomes too light and OVER-responsive for my needs. And my car gets aligned every other year.

And exactly what are you implying with "first-worlder"?
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Old Today, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,983 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HumbleMerchant View Post
Why do people keep repeating this nonsense is way beyond me. If you don't alter the tire dimensions drastically, your door placard will show the correct pressure for your car. The pressure shown on the tire itself shows the maximum pressure this tire can safely be operated at.

Because many people are IGNORANT and REFUSE TO LISTEN and LEARN.

The way their brains work, if they need to fix something, they refer to that something itself, not to what it might be attached. Comprende?

Ergo: their tire pressures are off, they refer automatically to information on the tire. That's the most complex process their brains can handle.

Same with most televisions I've calibrated the settings on: Most peoples' brains are wired as follows: Don't like the way the picture looks? Crank up this setting or that one. Simple!

The little sliders on an audio equalizer? No problem - slide them all to their uppermost MAX position! See a pattern developing here? No wonder so many newborn babies are being named 'MAX'.

Ever see a window Aircon unit set anywhere below MAX? Or a compact portable space heater? Betcha won't!


Last edited by TheGrandK-Man; Today at 05:48 AM..
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Old Today, 06:13 AM
 
2,709 posts, read 2,901,542 times
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Add more factors like: gas mileage, tire wear, winter/summer tires, leaky wheels (esp. aluminum wheels and potholes in the North country), and temperature changes to the formula...

No wonder manufacturers are trying to perfect airless tires...maybe they can invent an automatic refill system?

I use what's on the door sticker and check 'em occasionally, they always require some refilling and balancing ... ... good thing I have a garage and a compressor.

(remember when filling stations would sometime actually check the air and correct for drivers? ... or at least when stations had free air pumps, and cars had spare tires?)

Nothing to worry about.
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Old Today, 07:04 AM
 
927 posts, read 353,401 times
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I would imagine the tire pressures stickers on the doors are a result of the anticipated load within the vehicle and the tire pressure when the vehicle was tested to come up with their MPG rating. Always trying to get that number as high as possible.

That being said as well as from personal experience, the posted pressures are normally on the High side.
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Old Today, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,983 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
I would imagine the tire pressures stickers on the doors are a result of the anticipated load within the vehicle and the tire pressure when the vehicle was tested to come up with their MPG rating. Always trying to get that number as high as possible.

That being said as well as from personal experience, the posted pressures are normally on the High side.

Actually, the 30PSI cold decaled on our 2004 Corolla strikes a decent balance between handling and comfort.

The 33PSI specified on my decade newer Elantra IS a tad on the high side. I run 32 all around, and it makes a noticeable difference.
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Old Today, 07:22 AM
 
4,201 posts, read 1,806,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
I would imagine the tire pressures stickers on the doors are a result of the anticipated load within the vehicle and the tire pressure when the vehicle was tested to come up with their MPG rating. Always trying to get that number as high as possible.

That being said as well as from personal experience, the posted pressures are normally on the High side.
Oh really? So your personal experience includes skid-pad testing on each of your vehicles while varying tire pressure? Could you post the plotted data?


Maybe you could also post the NVH data on your "rough road" test course, as a function of tire pressure, with other factors controlled for.
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Old Today, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,983 posts, read 713,289 times
Reputation: 1597
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Oh really? So your personal experience includes skid-pad testing on each of your vehicles while varying tire pressure? Could you post the plotted data?


Maybe you could also post the NVH data on your "rough road" test course, as a function of tire pressure, with other factors controlled for.
The vehicle's manufacturer ALREADY DID all that! That's how they determined the cold inflation pressures listed on the load decal
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Old Today, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
12,764 posts, read 19,359,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motormaker View Post
Tire pressure numbers are recommended by the car maker and depends on maximum loaded weight of the Carr.
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You’ll find the manufacturer’s optimum or recommended tire pressure for your car on a sticker in the door jam, or in your owner’s manual. Some models even place the stickers on the trunk lid, in the console or on the fuel door.

Recommended pressure is usually between 30 and 35 PSI. That number indicates the minimum amount of air pressure needed to support your vehicle’s maximum load-carrying capacity. Any less, and you’ll see poor fuel economy and handling as well as premature wear from too much flexing and tire overloading.
If we are not loading our cars to the maximum load-carrying capacity very often, then putting a few extra pounds in the tire doesn't hurt anything, right?
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Old Today, 07:32 AM
 
5,797 posts, read 6,642,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
My questions:

1. Does the car manufacturer's recommendation apply to every tire?
2. Does the tire manufacturer's recommendation apply to every vehicle?

If the answer to either question is No, what is the source of guidance?
I call this the "Microwave Popcorn" problem. Every microwave has a "popcorn" button, and every bag of popcorn says not to use it. This is because the microwave and popcorn people work for totally different companies and do not collaborate.
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Old Today, 07:33 AM
 
5,797 posts, read 6,642,127 times
Reputation: 3527
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandK-Man View Post
He says better to set a couple PSI below the Max Cold stamped on the tires.
One upside to this is that you have to add air less often. Especially if you are expecting winter weather or have a slow leak.
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