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Old Today, 07:36 AM
 
5,949 posts, read 4,210,730 times
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LOL at believing one can feel 1PSI diff in an econobox on public roads.
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Old Today, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,987 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elhelmete View Post
LOL at believing one can feel 1PSI diff in an econobox on public roads.

It's my butt, in my seat, and my hands on the steering wheel - in my car.

Your mileage may vary.
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Old Today, 08:02 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 1,806,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandK-Man View Post
The vehicle's manufacturer ALREADY DID all that! That's how they determined the cold inflation pressures listed on the load decal
Yes, exactly, that was the whole point of my first post on this subject.
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Old Today, 08:07 AM
 
31,370 posts, read 25,105,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
"What's your definition of "better handling"?"

race cars start races with below normal tire pressure since the pressure will build to the desired level after several laps.
consider your average driving time, and the ambient air temperature. personally, our tires are inflated to the maximum
cold temperature rating since we do not drive very far for very long.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandK-Man View Post
I'm talking average Joe/Jane here, 99-Percenters, folks driving to work, soccer, church, the Cape for the weekends, not circuit.

street tires work the same as race tires do, the only difference is that race tires build heat more quickly than street tires do. so td is right that you have to take into consideration your type of driving, your style of driving, the average temperature in your area where you do your driving, etc.


for instance, lets say you do a lot of highway driving in hot weather. that means your tires are going to build a lot of heat in them, and thee pressures will increase in the tires. if you start out with pressures at the max, you could run into issues with tire wear, or other issues due to the heat.


as for setting the tire pressures, it depends on how sensitive your car is to tire pressures. the old VW beetles(the rear engine rear drive cars) were very sensitive and if the tire pressures were not set to the manufacturers recommendations, the car tended to be squirrelly when driving, especially when you set the pressures at the tire manufacturers max rating.
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Old Today, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,987 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbohm View Post
street tires work the same as race tires do, the only difference is that race tires build heat more quickly than street tires do. so td is right that you have to take into consideration your type of driving, your style of driving, the average temperature in your area where you do your driving, etc.


for instance, lets say you do a lot of highway driving in hot weather. that means your tires are going to build a lot of heat in them, and thee pressures will increase in the tires. if you start out with pressures at the max, you could run into issues with tire wear, or other issues due to the heat.


as for setting the tire pressures, it depends on how sensitive your car is to tire pressures. the old VW beetles(the rear engine rear drive cars) were very sensitive and if the tire pressures were not set to the manufacturers recommendations, the car tended to be squirrelly when driving, especially when you set the pressures at the tire manufacturers max rating.

Again, you're preaching to someone who already understands all of this. I never set my tire pressures anywhere near the Max. Cold pressure listed on tires.

In the vast majority of modern(post 1990s) vehicles, the vehicle manufacturer recommended tire pressures are well below the Max. Cold pressure stamped on the tires. On some light trucks, the vehicle decal pressures do = max cold psi on the tires, particularly for the load axle(the rear), but that is the exception.

Listen the whole point of my thread was to indicate that everyone, including those we trust and pay to service our cars, no longer goes by the car manufacturer recommended pressures, but inflates to what the tire max says. Which. Is. WRONG.
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Old Today, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Davidson, NC
108 posts, read 52,844 times
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Wow, there are some interesting ideas in here. Mainly the falsehood that higher air pressure automatically translates into increased grip/handling. Maybe in some cases but, not an absolute truth.

Higher pressures increase the spring rate of the tire and limit how much the tire can deform to the road surface. So while it may feel more positive at a higher pressure you may actually have lower overall performance than correct pressures due to a smaller contact patch.

Those numbers aren't just arbitrary values. They take into account the weight distribution of the car and the factory suspension tuning. They are also specific to OEM tire the car came with. If you go from an all-season touring tire to a max performance summer tire or R compound you will likely need to adjust those pressures significantly. To pick the pressure just because it is stamped on the side of tire is dumb. That tire doesn't know if it's on a pickup truck with nothing in the bed or a Tahoe with a family and towing a boat.

You should also be filling your tires with nitrogen instead of air since it is drier and tire pressure will grow less as the temperature of the tire builds.
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Old Today, 09:01 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 1,806,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrod2448 View Post



You should also be filling your tires with nitrogen instead of air since it is drier and tire pressure will grow less as the temperature of the tire builds.
Well, I guess we know SOMEONE slept through physics class in high school!
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Old Today, 09:36 AM
 
4,137 posts, read 2,273,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandK-Man View Post
Actually, following instructions is not a "mole hill". It's something we're(supposedly) taught to do when growing up, or while in school.
Ok so you fill your tires up to 29 PSI or you do it to 32 PSI. Jesus this isnít Quantum Physics and it certainly isnít going to turn a Kia into a 911.

Mountain meet mole hill.
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Old Today, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Riding a rock floating through space
1,196 posts, read 317,041 times
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For every vehicle i've owned it's 35 psi.
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Old Today, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Cleaning CAT VOMIT out of radiators
1,987 posts, read 713,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duke944 View Post
For every vehicle i've owned it's 35 psi.
Suspension design also figures into specified cold tire pressures. For my Elantra, putting 35psi cold in would turn it into a basketball. For your vehicle, 35psi might mean a smooth ride with good handling. Different cars, different requirements.
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