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Old 02-09-2019, 03:49 PM
 
36 posts, read 4,878 times
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I bought the car new, burned in with reg oil, once burn in period was over I switched to full synthetic, and never regretted it BUT my understanding is, once you got many miles on it, switching to synthetic can mess up the seals due to having been soaked all this time in conventional oil, then the synthetic comes in and sends the car to the mechanic..I'd not do at this point in time....
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Travelers Rest S.C.
148 posts, read 148,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kennywally51 View Post
I bought the car new, burned in with reg oil, once burn in period was over I switched to full synthetic, and never regretted it BUT my understanding is, once you got many miles on it, switching to synthetic can mess up the seals due to having been soaked all this time in conventional oil, then the synthetic comes in and sends the car to the mechanic..I'd not do at this point in time....
Wrong, both oils mix fine and will not cause leaks one way or another.
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Travelers Rest S.C.
148 posts, read 148,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbiz1 View Post
Hmm,

I switched to synthetic recently, and developed a small leak in the corner orange rubber gasket; top of intake manifold. These were all replaced 3 years ago.
I've already been back to said mechanic, who will re-do the job at no cost.
But that gasket should not have failed, so am now pondering switching back to conventional.
I've talked to several mechanics in fact, and nobody can seem to figure out why a motor w/only 70K would keep leaking from the exact same gasket.
Let me guess a 4.3 or 5.7 chevy? Notorious for intake gaskets going bad. Not your Techs fault or the oil.
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Old 02-09-2019, 07:03 PM
 
12,549 posts, read 6,538,432 times
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Back in the day, cars with conventional oil that did a lot of stop & go and cold starts not fully warming the car up tended to have sludge build-up problems. You'd put that engine side by side with an engine that used synthetic with the same use pattern and it wouldn't have the sludge problem. Conventional oil got better to comply with updated manufacturer specs. Engine designs got better. It's much less of a problem now. I run Mobil 1 when the manual says conventional oil but it's probably not helping any.
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,605 posts, read 12,358,942 times
Reputation: 10619
Quote:
All motor oils are actually synthetic now, so there's no point in buying something advertised as synthetic because you're already using it
What you need to be aware of is that yesterdays conventionals are now today's synthetics.You might also want to know that most formulators are now also including recycled oil in the motor oils you are using. It comes out as a shear stable Group III synthetic base oil. It will be clear in color and it's a good base oil but some folks still have an aversion to it. Synthetic oils are a premium priced product. If you pay a premium price for something, you should get premium results. Synthetic oils fail at providing anything more than stability to the product. In regards to wear metals, no synthetic provides for lower wear metals across thousands of oil reports. Some engines using synthetic oils will have higher wear metals in analysis due to the yellow metals inside the engine. GM engines are notorious for it.



Quote:
Motor oils which are synthetic or have a greater percentage of synthetic base will offer no wear advantages in any situations, such as extended OCI, extreme temperatures, shear strength in extreme-duty applications, etc.
NO, you're throwing far too much into one category. Synthetics bring stability to the game, nothing more. For extended oil changes you would want more stability. But it's like anything else, how extended do you want to go? Providing fuel dilution is not an issue, many of the conventional oils can easily go 7500 miles with zero issues. Depending on the engine, some can go even farther into the 15,000 mile range with no issues concerning stability. But you'll find the additive package will be weak at best, and that includes the synthetics too. In extreme temperatures, ALL oils that wear the Ford certifications are double length tested. Standard testing under ASTM D5800 calls for the oil to be at 302F for one hour. It cannot move out of it's respective viscosity range and high heat deposits are half that of API or 30mgs. So the oil cannot shear or oxidize out of the SAE viscosity range and high heat deposits are half API requirements. That is synthetic oils AND conventional oils. FWIW, your engine won't make it at that temp for one hour as internal or core temps would be in the 4 digits. You will have damage. So shear strength is not an issue and neither is oxidation in a modern engine with an enclosed crankcase system.


While there have been major advances in the oils we buy, there have been major advances in the engines we buy. Most just don't generate the deposits and combustion trash of engines of 20 years ago. The demands on the oils have been reduced considerably. We no longer have carbs that literally flood the combustion chamber with fuel that ends up in the oil. We have far cleaner gasolines than ever that helps keep the engine run cleaner. Our engines are now computer controlled to keep the combustion deposits to a fraction of what they were. As someone stated earlier, it's hard to buy a lousy motor oil today.
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Old 02-10-2019, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Vermont
347 posts, read 85,088 times
Reputation: 645
If you feel I'm throwing too much into one category, don't all of those conditions reflect how average Joe and Jane actually treat their cars?
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:52 AM
 
1,039 posts, read 512,127 times
Reputation: 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmelfi View Post
Let me guess a 4.3 or 5.7 chevy? Notorious for intake gaskets going bad. Not your Techs fault or the oil.

LOL, close; chevy 3.5L V6.
Originally it was the old dexcool causing failures, lawsuits in California were settled a decade ago.
It took almost a decade for it to leak originally, yet my tech's replacement job took less than a year.
So it's either the tech, or switching to synthetic; of which the same tech put in.
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Old 02-10-2019, 12:04 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 512,127 times
Reputation: 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
Some engines using synthetic oils will have higher wear metals in analysis due to the yellow metals inside the engine. GM engines are notorious for it.

Would this be yet another reason for this GM owner to switch back to conventional?.
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Old 02-10-2019, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,339 posts, read 28,064,040 times
Reputation: 12007
There is nothing wrong with the conventional oils of today. Just follow the recommended oils specified in the owner's manual (plus change intervals) at least until the warranty expires. A lot of automobiles of today that have normally aspirated motors (not turbo), do not specify if the coil should be conventional or synthetic. For example, the Subaru 2009 Forester shows 5W-30 oil, and so the 2010 RAV4 V6. The change interval is 5,000 miles, or 5 months (whichever comes first).

However, lets say that you hardly drive a car and only put 1,000 miles every 5 months. In this case use the recommended oil in the manual, and replace it every 3,000 miles until the warranty is over, or as long as you own the car. But if the car is already out of warranty and you want to stretch the miles to perhaps 5,000 miles and more, then a synthetic blend would be beneficial.

I have always used conventional oils until a few of years ago when Walmart arrived to Fairbanks, where a gallon of Mobil 1 costs about $2.00 more than a gallon of conventional oil.

2012 Corolla: 0W-20 year round
2010 RAV4 V6: 5W-30 year round
2001 Silverado 350-Vortex motor: 5W30 year round
1988 GMC Step-side with a 350 TBI: perfect shape, but parked, 1 oil change a year: 5W-30 (any oil type since I don't drive it)
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:35 PM
 
1,871 posts, read 675,784 times
Reputation: 3536
don1945 said it best.
new car= synthetic until seeping starts (150K?).
i would Up the Weight with conventional after that.
we have a 1987 Camry on 20-50.

turkey-head is right, too.
use synthetic for those long-term fluids.
might not EVER have to do anything after that.
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