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Old 02-14-2019, 01:39 PM
 
22 posts, read 4,272 times
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If you look at the bottom of the car and there is a little rust, would that be ok as long as you rustproof the car every year?

edit: location is Midwest where it snows a lot.

Last edited by Marchwagon; 02-14-2019 at 02:03 PM..
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Old 02-14-2019, 01:57 PM
 
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Rustproofing generally won't stop the deterioration once it's started. That's more for stopping it from starting in the first place.

Alot depends on your area. If you're in Phoenix.. that rust probably isn't going to grow much.. Upstate NY.. Different story.
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:26 PM
 
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Age of car? Where is rust--on the frame, on the suspension, or in the fenders or engine compartment?


A little rust in a snow and salt state is not unheard of. Depending on the age, if it is rusted through and spread widely or really nasty, then maybe walk the other way.


It is like porn: you know it when you see it. If it bothers you, don't buy.
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Saint Paul
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Rust on some fenders is no big deal, as they may be fairly cheap and easy to replace. Rocker panels are tougher. Doors would probably need to be replaced and finding a rust-free one in a salvage yard would be the way to go.

Rust definitely lowers the price for a used car, so I guess focus on the mechanic condition and if it's good then decide.
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Old 02-14-2019, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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One data point:

My ex bought her Civic for what seemed a good price when there were just the first tiny signs of rust in the wheel wells.

Two and a half years later she took in to a scrap yard. In that time, the brake lines burst, clutch line burst, the bolt heads for most components under the car had deteriorated to the point where a torch was needed to replace anything, and the frame was getting swiss-cheesy enough that it wouldn't have been able to pass the next inspection.

It still wasn't a bad price to drive car for 2.5 years, but frankly I don't buy used cars in Vermont, I drive/fly south and bring one up which hasn't seen any of our winters yet.
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Old 02-14-2019, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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rustproofing does nothing and often makes things worse. however you can use chemicals to remove the loose/surface rust and then use another chemical (paint) that bonds the rusted metal back together. One such is made by rustoleum. there are other formulas that do the same ting from other brands. I have not used it a lot, but my brother has had very good luck with it.

However unless the car is very old, there should not be any rust. If there is, just go find one with no rust. there are plenty of cars around that are 10 - 15 years old with no rust at all (not including surface oxidation on the unpainted undercarriage. that occurs almost immediately and is harmless). We live in a super salty place (SE Michigan) At the end of the winter, they dump the left over salt not the roads in piles so they do not get their salt budget reduced the next year (at least they used to a few years ago, I have not seen that in a while because we have had a lot of need for salt during the winter seasons).
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Old 02-14-2019, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Cape Cod
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Rust kills cars. If it is on the frame it can eat its way through. I have older vehicles that have had brake lines replaced and even a gas tank. The days are numbered on 2 of my vehicles. If not for the rust from living in the North East I would keep both of these cars for many more years.

If rust is on the outside and greater than a 2 inch hole it has to be repaired in my state or you don't get an inspection sticker.



If you are thinking about buying an older car with rust on it why not bring it to a mechanic for an inspection? They could put it up in a lift and have a look at the vitals. It could save you from making a mistake.
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Old 02-14-2019, 11:07 PM
 
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This guy is great.

Perfect example as to why you have a inspection and you don’t buy a car that has any rust.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wajUttqHg7k
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Old 02-15-2019, 08:58 AM
 
22 posts, read 4,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
rustproofing does nothing and often makes things worse. however you can use chemicals to remove the loose/surface rust and then use another chemical (paint) that bonds the rusted metal back together. One such is made by rustoleum. there are other formulas that do the same ting from other brands. I have not used it a lot, but my brother has had very good luck with it.

However unless the car is very old, there should not be any rust. If there is, just go find one with no rust. there are plenty of cars around that are 10 - 15 years old with no rust at all (not including surface oxidation on the unpainted undercarriage. that occurs almost immediately and is harmless). We live in a super salty place (SE Michigan) At the end of the winter, they dump the left over salt not the roads in piles so they do not get their salt budget reduced the next year (at least they used to a few years ago, I have not seen that in a while because we have had a lot of need for salt during the winter seasons).
If rustproofing often makes things worse, would the only thing that could prevent rust be frequent carwash?

For 10-15 year old cars with no rust, would that mean they have been washed frequently?
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:33 AM
 
1,465 posts, read 410,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
rustproofing does nothing and often makes things worse. however you can use chemicals to remove the loose/surface rust and then use another chemical (paint) that bonds the rusted metal back together. One such is made by rustoleum. there are other formulas that do the same ting from other brands. I have not used it a lot, but my brother has had very good luck with it.
.
The only problem with this stuff is that it only works on the surface and doesnt go deep.
But really, if the rust isnt just on the surface, the panel is too far gone.
For those that dont work on their own car, the best way is just to avoid the car that has any sign of rust.
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