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Old 02-19-2019, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,598 posts, read 1,893,535 times
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Applause for your grasp of old union book songs, but whiskey tango foxtrot otherwise...
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Old 02-19-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Location: in the soup
3,602 posts, read 1,508,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Applause for your grasp of old union book songs, but whiskey tango foxtrot otherwise...
Just saying that I'd love to find that magical world where electronic diagnosis is as simple as you describe.
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Old 02-19-2019, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,598 posts, read 1,893,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkey-head View Post
Just saying that I'd love to find that magical world where electronic diagnosis is as simple as you describe.
My slightly second-hand experience is that nearly all modern cars can be diagnosed, at the dealer level, through OBD and other ports, with sometimes secondary testing of modules required.

Does any modern mechanic get near an actual circuit board? I don't regard a little bit of voltage and signal testing as an overwhelming task for a grease monkey, but then, I've known mechanics who will reach through a rotating front assembly to tweak something while being terrified of a multimeter.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,445 posts, read 687,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katana49 View Post
^^^^ What he said.

If you're about to be 18 and didn't already have an aptitude and desire for this stuff for years already... You're way behind the curve. Couple that with your "Steam car" thread and lack of knowledge regarding some very basic automotive concepts and I would say that being an auto tech is not in your future.
Oh look at the bickering again sheesh


Just because I explained a bit vaguely some automotive systems doesn't mean I don't know ****


I've studied the car battery, the ignition system, the inside of an engine, the cooling system and the transmission systems


Here's some animations to let you all know

https://youtu.be/W94iksaQwUo

https://youtu.be/XCa7z4NN_CA

https://youtu.be/mmmcj53TNic


https://youtu.be/wCu9W9xNwtI


You better stop expecting so much from me still, like you all really wanna ignite a headed tread or something.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:39 PM
 
1,511 posts, read 2,248,125 times
Reputation: 1667
Quote:
Originally Posted by turkey-head View Post
Speaking as a former mechanic (first career) and current engineer (second career):

If you enjoy being poorly compensated and given no respect while people demand that you do the impossible... go for it!

If you like the idea of spending enough money to pay for a college education on tools that allow you to work a mediocre job, then working as a mechanic might just be for you!

If you like working for free hecause because some bean-counter who has never seen a wrench decided to pay 1 hour for a 3 hour job... you may be mechanic material.

If you enjoy being paid half what an engineer makes for twice the effort and in dangerous, unpleasant, unhealthy working conditions... then there's a place for you in the shop!


Now that's not to say that working as a mechanic is all bad. Just saying that there are MUCH easier ways to make a living. But it does have a few good points:

1. You'll build mechanical skills so that you rarely have to pay auto repair bills.
2. There is *always* a job available when you're a mechanic. May not be a good job... but there's always a job.
3. As long as you're getting the job done, you can act like a complete ass. Spit on the floor, refuse to shower for a month, smoke in the shop- preferably next to flammables, show up drunk and/or high, throw things at co-workers, steal from the shop/customers/coworkers, get in fights with coworkers and/or customers, damage costomer and/or shop equipment intentionally, engage in fraud, yell at and/or threaten the boss, spit on the boss's shoe, hire a crack-*****... I've seen all that and more from co-workers over the years. And as long as they were getting the job done, they generally remained employed. Working as a mechanic will give you an entirely different perspective on humanity compared to what you'll learn in a cubicle-farm
Yup.

I loved working on cars and motorcycles growing up. Realized pretty early that working as a professional is for suckers with a few exceptions. The pay sucks, flat rate is a scam, and many of your coworkers will half ass things and do all sorts of unethical things. If you like working on cars, learn to do it on your own time and then go get an accounting or engineering degree. Way more money than a mechanic makes and you can work on your own car on the weekends if you want to.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
35,011 posts, read 53,617,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post

Anyways, back to the topic, is still worth it becoming an auto tech? How will electric cars for that matter, impact the business?
Do you believe that electric cars will never break down?
The best way to earn more money in this trade is to specialize in luxury foreign cars.
It would beat the general knowledge of a mechanic working in Jiffy Lube or such.

See if there is such shop where you live and ask if you can hang around and learn about the job there.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,445 posts, read 687,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Do you believe that electric cars will never break down?
The best way to earn more money in this trade is to specialize in luxury foreign cars.
It would beat the general knowledge of a mechanic working in Jiffy Lube or such.

See if there is such shop where you live and ask if you can hang around and learn about the job there.
That's funny 2 years ago (Summer of 2017) I almost got to volunteer at a diesel transmission specialty shop 2 years ago, but the owner did not view me ready for it for some reason
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte FL
994 posts, read 571,895 times
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forget about it unless you are especially drawn to it..get a job where you can use your brain and not your body..go into the insurance field or some aspect of the financial world..use money as a tool and learn how to use it to..save as much as you can and learn about investing..not just about money but also about yourself and your future or you'll end up in a dead end job with little hope of moving out of it..
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,598 posts, read 1,893,535 times
Reputation: 8460
Quote:
Originally Posted by double6's View Post
forget about it unless you are especially drawn to it..get a job where you can use your brain and not your body..go into the insurance field or some aspect of the financial world..use money as a tool and learn how to use it to..save as much as you can and learn about investing..not just about money but also about yourself and your future or you'll end up in a dead end job with little hope of moving out of it..
Because, of course, there is nothing that matters about employment except making the maximum amount of money.
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Old 02-19-2019, 07:07 PM
 
Location: in the soup
3,602 posts, read 1,508,060 times
Reputation: 3914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
My slightly second-hand experience is that nearly all modern cars can be diagnosed, at the dealer level, through OBD and other ports, with sometimes secondary testing of modules required.

Does any modern mechanic get near an actual circuit board? I don't regard a little bit of voltage and signal testing as an overwhelming task for a grease monkey, but then, I've known mechanics who will reach through a rotating front assembly to tweak something while being terrified of a multimeter.

I'm sure you can see why such a claim based on "second-hand experience" doesn't really warrant an explanation. But such is the glory of being a mechanic. Every half-literate cubicle-dweller out there *thinks* they can do your job and doesn't want to pay for it... but yet doing it themselves is out of the question.

So if you're working at a dealership, only working on newer vehicles, and hoovering the service writer's Richard so that you're handed the easy jobs... then sure. There are many cases where you can plug in a scanner, read the code, swap the part... and you're done. But that's *only* the case where well known, common failures are concerned. And then only because you (or somebody) have done the actual troubleshooting on similar failures before.

An error code does NOT tell you what the problem is. At best it tells you on what particular circuit the problem lies. More accurately it tells you that the error code criteria written by some code monkey on another continent a decade ago has been met... criteria which is rarely documented in any real detail. If you're lucky (say, 90% of the time), the code description will actually match the circuit and the (very) general description of what sets the code. Say, signal voltage below .25V or above 4.75V on a sensor with a 5V range.

So why is that signal voltage below .25V?

Could be a bad sensor- often you can test that if you know what you're doing. But what if the sensor tests ok? Keep in mind that you can never truly prove that a sensor is good under all conditions... you can only prove that it's NOT working if you're lucky enough to find that in a test. Or maybe that sensor only fails when it gets to 200 degrees at 80%+ humidity, in which case the sensor that just tested good is actually bad.

Could be a loose/burnt/corroded connector pin or rubbed through wire in a section of wiring harness that's impossible to see... let alone access and really inspect. So you inspect what you can get to. If you actually know something about electronics, you can isolate and load test each wire and prove that it'll carry 5 amps, or whatever you reckon is safe. But keep in mind, you can never truly prove that the wiring is good under all conditions. Maybe that wiring is broken inside the insulation- so not visible even if you COULD access the completely inaccessible location where this break happens to be. And that break in the wiring only loses connection when you hit a bump while turning to the right on Tuesdays. In which case that wire that just tested good is actually bad.

Could be a bad controller. Now despite popular opinion on the matter, there does not exist *any* way to test an electronic controller and say that it's 100% good in all conditions. So if you're lucky enough to have access to a new/test controller, a relatively easy check is to swap in that known good controller. If it works, you've found your problem. Well, unless of course the problem is actually with the power supply or ground circuit TO the controller. Which can cause just about any error code under the sun, and might work perfectly well until things get nice and hot, and the customer's kid kicks the dash in just the right spot to wiggle a loose connection. In which case the customer is gonna be real impressed that they just spent $1500 on a controller they didn't need

Could be that an entirely different sensor that shares the same regulated 5V supply is shorting to ground... bringing supply voltage down and causing said code. If you're lucky enough to catch that in action, you can unplug one sensor at a time and see if the regulated voltage comes back up. Or maybe the short only occurs when they run through a puddle of salt water... in which case you're not gonna find it right now.

Could be that two or more of the above are marginal such that they don't quite test bad... but a marginal sensor and a marginal connector pin add up to voltage out of range.

Or it could be that NONE of the above parts have failed. Could be a problem with poorly written software throwing the code under some peculiar condition, documented in some obscure service bulletin that nobody's ever heard of. Or never documented at all.


Now, a good mechanic can usually work through the above possibilities and fix your problem. And the customer will cry about having to pay an hour of diagnostic time because he knows through "second-hand experience" that all the mechanic had to do was plug in a code reader.

Last edited by turkey-head; 02-19-2019 at 07:33 PM..
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