U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-20-2019, 12:46 PM
 
1,511 posts, read 2,247,338 times
Reputation: 1663

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Back in the "old days" mechanics were not doing too badly. Then the Vo-Tech schools came along and overpopulated the ranks of those turning wrenches. Too many guys looking for work lowered the wages, the bosses now had a huge surplus of desperado's to exploit, and they did--it was all over for good wages. Yeah, there are still some senior guys making a hundred grand and more annually, but that is only possible in the team construct which makes one guy the King, and the rest serfs--and the King takes a cut from their productivity.

Having a King allows for the carrot-in-front of the-horse situation to become a perpetual battle for those on the serf side to step up and challenge the King for dominance, and the king paycheck. This assures the younger people that there is indeed room for advancement, but not too much. Most good techs eventually move on in order to get more money, they are then, and only then, allowed to negotiate a higher pay rate at the new job.

My wife's son in law law is a local, fifty year old tech, he made 110,000 last year, he is the team king where he works, some of the thirty year old's are preparing to topple him off the throne..So, no, there isn't much of a future in the automotive trades. It takes a ton of tools, ten tons of know-how, and a hundred tons of perseverance to get through a day, not to mention the backaches, solvent exposure, and lack of job security which comes with the territory..Walk on by..Save yourself.
Exactly.

People who say otherwise are being delusional. Trades do not make 100K easily like in other fields. Save yourself the headache of being a professional wrench monkey. Get an education in something useful and work on cars on the weekend if that's your thing.


Contrary to what some say in this thread, working on a vehicle is not open heart surgery. It takes some skills and know how, but it is not that difficult. Tens of thousands of people build and work on vehicles as a hobby. That should tell you about the demand for the skill set that comes with being a professional. Number crunchers will crap all over your worth with the notion that anyone can do it. That is of course a completely false notion. But they will view mechanics as expendable.

Last edited by Pyramidsurf; 02-20-2019 at 01:00 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-20-2019, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,824 posts, read 22,775,680 times
Reputation: 29166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I wouldn't in any way disagree that an early aptitude for something points to a good career choice. But then again, quite a few 18yo's can't tell their brass from their oboe, so choosing education and a career based on the idea that they can achieve competence is not a rare or unusual thing.


I can't think of any other threads I've read but you could well be right. Still, even a master mechanic had to be told which end of a screwdriver was which, at least once.
Like lefty loosey.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,824 posts, read 22,775,680 times
Reputation: 29166
Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
If I enjoyed mechanic work, I'd go into the military and specialize in diesel or aircraft mechanics. They'll even furnish the tools.
My son's friend is a helicopter mechanic for the Army. He likes it well enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
1,998 posts, read 800,704 times
Reputation: 5607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post
Here I am trying to think of career choices as a soon to be 18 year old and under current family conditions don't even have money for a permit yet lol


Eventually things will change once I suppose that I get out of the family situation

Anyways, back to the topic, is still worth it becoming an auto tech? How will electric cars for that matter, impact the business?
Here in Florida mechanics that can work on luxury brand cars earn very good money. Think BMW, Jaguar, Maserati,Mercedes, Porsche, and any other high end foreign badge. Dealerships are always looking for skilled techs who can work on the better stuff, and pay well.

If you stay in Texas I would still advise you to go high end if you can.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 12:45 PM
 
3,795 posts, read 3,137,499 times
Reputation: 10559
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
Yes, we all have to deal with our physical limitations. My accountant of many years has had 2 heart attacks and now lives with a lot of scar tissue in his heart along with an implanted defibrilator which has triggered a couple of times. And he's got backaches from sitting for so many hours per day for years along with vision issues from computer monitors for so many hours.

The evil solvents used in the trades were banned by OSHA and other agencies many years ago. You won't find trike vats or benzene solvents in shops anymore, and proper parts washing equipment these days is generally water-based soap solutions.


Lack of job security? what a laugh
… there's how many millions of vehicles on the road today which require maintenance, repairs, and servicing? Who is gonna' fix them … the elves and unicorn patrol on the streets? all the quick lube shops? or are the vehicles going to the scrap heap when the first mechanical or electronics problem presents'?
I'll begin here by stating the facts surrounding false notions of the term, "job security" and what it means for most people. In your world it could be defined as simple employment retention coupled with a large demand for your labor, but, in the larger sense, it really means that you stay where the fact of your employment longevity equals more than just the fact that you have a job. It really means that you are gaining, gaining in benefits, gaining in expertise, gaining with a view toward some real retirement $$ and not just an atta-boy party at the end of one's career. The fact remains that auto tech work is not compensated at those levels which make for a good life-long career choice.

I always enjoy good humor, that said, your attempts to diminish the very real and well deserved bad reputation of the nations auto dealers, by injecting the notions of elves and unicorns being asked to do the work of auto techs you seem to dismiss the greater concerns of the future employee and instead offer a consolation to the owner class by referring to the fact of there being a ton of work, but not necessarily a ton of good working conditions. Two entirely different views.

On the other hand, your assertions of there being a shortage of techs, and therefore a big demand for them is spot on. The trouble with recognizing half of the problem is--that the other half isn't being talked about. In this case that other half lies in the facts surrounding the entirety of the auto repair industry and it's antiquated notions of garnering a well trained, motivated, and well payed, labor force.
I've posted a link to the thoughts of others on that subject:


https://www.autonews.com/article/201...ership-profits

Lets take an unbiased look at the physical aspects of working on cars, yes, the work isn't that much different than a lot of blue collar work, bending, stooping, crawling, reaching overhead, lifting, pulling, it's a long list but most can identify with the idea of this work being hard on the body. Now seeing as how we have to work our entire lives, this aspect becomes a bit more of a concern, believe me, the average doc or desk jockey has far less damage done to their bod in their line of work. So, in light of that realization, one could easily say that being an auto tech is a young person's game, and that means more schooling further up the road, at a time when many people are raising kids, paying a huge mortgage, and tired.

I worked in the collision end of the automotive repair bizz, twenty six years of hard knocks, I owned, managed for others, sold cars, worked as an insurance adjuster, and eventually returned to the daily grind of working with the tools. Then I got smart and walked away from the entire auto business, went to work in the aviation manufacturing space and retired with a great union pension, fat 401K, and some semblance of health. All in all, the auto business ate my health, wealth, and any notions I had about pride in my work. "Get R done," could be the motto of all dealer shops, as flat rate pay programs eventually lead to an attitude which favors money over the quality of one's work.

I don't want to argue about whether the trade is a good or bad one, you have a different view of things from me, but I do think my own reflections on those years are of some help to those who are wondering if the tech business is a good choice. You can look on Indeed, and read to your heart's content about the real life experiences of those still active in the trade, for the most part it reads like a laundry list of grief. So, I'll stand by my original views of this business being one more American enterprise in need of a modern overhaul...

https://www.indeed.com/forum/job/aut...nymore/t459836
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 01:23 PM
 
2,508 posts, read 1,408,021 times
Reputation: 5083
I remember my auto mechanics teacher in high school.


He was exactly who you would think of as someone who has "made it" as an automotive mechanic/tech. He started young, eventually started his own shop and had a few employees under him.


By the time he was 50, the work and long hours had taken its toll. So he did the smart thing and sold his business. That wasn't a financial windfall for him by any means, between the mortgage on the property he had to pay off and other expenses, he netted about $450k. That sounds like a lot of money, but when you consider that was the final payoff in a career that spanned about 30 years... You see that he didn't really make a ton of money at it. He still had a home mortgage, etc. From there, he took a job as our high school automech teacher, which probably paid around $40k back then. He was also able to book jobs for paying customers through the shop, and he got a cut of the profits for the school, so I would say that he might have made $45k or so a year, as the customer volume wasn't that high. But, back in the 90's $45k was a decent salary, but nothing special. We did the work while he taught us how to do the work, so it was no longer his back aching at the end of a long day. He did that for 10 years and retired at 60. Pretty sure he got a somewhat decent pension from the ISD, and I'm sure he's doing ok financially barring any investment mistakes, but even with a success story like his, it's a far cry from the type of life most degreed professionals can achieve.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 04:27 PM
 
11,051 posts, read 42,194,508 times
Reputation: 14482
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
I'll begin here by stating the facts surrounding false notions of the term, "job security" and what it means for most people. In your world it could be defined as simple employment retention coupled with a large demand for your labor, but, in the larger sense, it really means that you stay where the fact of your employment longevity equals more than just the fact that you have a job. It really means that you are gaining, gaining in benefits, gaining in expertise, gaining with a view toward some real retirement $$ and not just an atta-boy party at the end of one's career. The fact remains that auto tech work is not compensated at those levels which make for a good life-long career choice.

thanks for putting “words in my mouth” so you set up a straw man to attack my viewpoint.

The FACT is that my perception of “job security” is the SAME as YOURS.

You just shot yourself in the foot with a FALSE PREMISE about my posts. The FACT is that an automotive career can lead to gains in benefits, expertise, real retirement benefits. That you didn’t achieve that or desire to pursue it for various reasons in your automotive career doesn’t mean that other cannot and do not.

I’ve repeatedly posted in these threads where I started with very little. I had numerous opportunities from college to purse an engineering career, but I was already making more money with my “pay for college” business I’d started from my dorm room and under the shady trees on campus, fixing other college kids’ vehicles. Now, at 70+ ... I have my ranch/farm, income real estate, airplane, vehicle fleet, boats, toys of other trappings, retirement SEP IRA and investment portfolio .. and all debt free. My retirement income is above an average income in my area. Fact: I had acquired all this by age 51. It gave me the opportunity to purse other business interests along with keeping my auto repair shop going for a selective clientele. I enjoy relatively good health ... not on any meds, still have all my teeth, and no more than average hearing/vision/mobility/energy losses for my age group. I certainly did not suffer from chemical exposure(s) through my automotive career ... I used these items with caution, along with personal safety gear at a time when it wasn’t very fashionable to do so and OSHA hadn’t entered the picture yet.


I always enjoy good humor, that said, your attempts to diminish the very real and well deserved bad reputation of the nations auto dealers, by injecting the notions of elves and unicorns being asked to do the work of auto techs you seem to dismiss the greater concerns of the future employee and instead offer a consolation to the owner class by referring to the fact of there being a ton of work, but not necessarily a ton of good working conditions. Two entirely different views.

On the other hand, your assertions of there being a shortage of techs, and therefore a big demand for them is spot on. The trouble with recognizing half of the problem is--that the other half isn't being talked about. In this case that other half lies in the facts surrounding the entirety of the auto repair industry and it's antiquated notions of garnering a well trained, motivated, and well payed, labor force.
I've posted a link to the thoughts of others on that subject:


https://www.autonews.com/article/201...ership-profits

Lets take an unbiased look at the physical aspects of working on cars, yes, the work isn't that much different than a lot of blue collar work, bending, stooping, crawling, reaching overhead, lifting, pulling, it's a long list but most can identify with the idea of this work being hard on the body. Now seeing as how we have to work our entire lives, this aspect becomes a bit more of a concern, believe me, the average doc or desk jockey has far less damage done to their bod in their line of work. So, in light of that realization, one could easily say that being an auto tech is a young person's game, and that means more schooling further up the road, at a time when many people are raising kids, paying a huge mortgage, and tired.

OK, so this trade is physical in nature. As you admit, that’s no different than so many others. Sounds to me like you’re condemning all such careers, right?

At that, I know numerous tradesman/craftsman who are, like me, still working in their chosen field. That includes carpenters, electricians, plumbers/pipe fitters, HVAC techs, bricklayers, and numerous other crafts/trades.


I worked in the collision end of the automotive repair bizz, twenty six years of hard knocks, I owned, managed for others, sold cars, worked as an insurance adjuster, and eventually returned to the daily grind of working with the tools. Then I got smart and walked away from the entire auto business, went to work in the aviation manufacturing space and retired with a great union pension, fat 401K, and some semblance of health. All in all, the auto business ate my health, wealth, and any notions I had about pride in my work. "Get R done," could be the motto of all dealer shops, as flat rate pay programs eventually lead to an attitude which favors money over the quality of one's work.

I’ve got relatives who went into engineering careers and sustained health issues as they were in frequent contact with hazardous substances found in their aerospace industry careers at GenDynamics, Lockheed, and similar major players in the industry. I’ve consulted on-site with some of these outfits and been exposed to some pretty nasty stuff in confined spaces ... where personal protective gear and strict adherence to company safety manuals was a necessity. But I’ve seen employees on those sites have medical issues with their constant exposure to these situations, too.

Flat rate pay can be a motivator or a path to short cuts which don’t benefit all parties. Much depends upon the culture of a given shop management. I paid my top techs flat rate and bonuses for productivity, but that required no come-backs and rigorous confirmation that the jobs had been done properly before releasing any work to a customer. I’ve personally done thousands of follow-up road tests to ensure quality control, also to assure that no issues related to the work product performed were a result of working on the customer’s car.

The key, IMO, to using flat rate as a valid compensation program is to pay a fair labor time and hourly rate. The published flat rate tables don’t always reflect real world repair conditions and I worked closely with my crew to adjust flat rate times to allow for proper work by a knowledgeable, competent, properly equipped tech.
My guys frequently took home additional portrait documents each week paper clipped to their paycheck. Friday afternoons oft times were a b-b-q and a “clean sweep” of the shop to include finishing up those projects which could reasonably be out the door for the week. The guys knew to work with each other to clear the deck for the next week’s work, it was a team effort. Rusty cars, old fasteners which didn’t cooperate ... all those factors that make life miserable to do a job in a timely manner ... we advised customers of the added time to address these issues. My guys knew that broken bolt extraction and/or heli-coils were going to be paid time, not out of their pocket issues to see lesser pay for a job properly done.


I don't want to argue about whether the trade is a good or bad one, you have a different view of things from me, but I do think my own reflections on those years are of some help to those who are wondering if the tech business is a good choice. You can look on Indeed, and read to your heart's content about the real life experiences of those still active in the trade, for the most part it reads like a laundry list of grief. So, I'll stand by my original views of this business being one more American enterprise in need of a modern overhaul...

I get it. Your views are valid and mine are not. You’d rather encourage an interested youngster to do something else with their life than seek a trade for which they may be motivated and capable of being the success which you weren’t. So be it. I get to read a lot of industry trade journals and there’s many thousands of people who have found this career path to be their “cup o’ tea”. Yes, there are concerns about doing this work and the industry is working at solutions to them.

Please, don’t try to tell us that every other profession or trade doesn’t have it’s problems ... I get to see the complaints from Doctors, Lawyers, Accountants, Engineers, Chemists, as common issues of working conditions, compensation, and work satisfaction are brought up with them, too. I’ve sat on board meetings with our local hospital, I’ve had candid conversations with medical industry professionals ... and the complaints are virtually identical to what you assert are such problems with the auto trades. Going through an internship has to be one of the most physically and mentally abusive processes in the guise of education as one could possibly imagine. And there’s serious life-threatening risks in the medical profession ... I personally know 3 surgeons who contracted HepC from a “needle stick” and ended their career. I had one ERoom doc frantically calling me after he’d realized he had a needle stick when he was sticking me up from a hand injury ... and was demanding I return for a blood test to verify that he wasn’t at risk for some career changing disease.

As an aside in this thread, some folks have mentioned that since so many people work on their own cars that it must be an easy thing to do and/or master. OTOH, I think of the millions of folks in the USA that do their own taxes, for example. Following that logic, it must mean that being an accountant is a really easy thing to do. Why, just look at the hundreds of folk hired at tax time each year for outfits such as H&R Block ...they drag folks in from off the street to do this work for a fee with minimal training, education, and experience ... and they “guarantee” the accuracy of their work.

Ah, c’mon ... you and I know that there’s more to either being a tech or an accountant than that fallacy presents. But that doesn’t keep the degree holders from looking down their noses at the auto tech, does it?




https://www.indeed.com/forum/job/aut...nymore/t459836
Yes, there’s a bunch of dissatisfied folk in the auto trades. I certainly wouldn’t try to keep them from exploring other options. By the same token, I know folk dissatisfied with professional career paths who have embraced the auto trades. One was a pediatrician ... who got nailed on a dubious medical claim payout. His next malpractice insurance bill was higher than he’d been taking home for years. He folded his practice and pursued his other love ... motorcycles. Got trained as a HD tech by an indie shop and later hired by a SLC HD dealer. He’s happier working on bikes these days and claims his income is a good as he was making as a doctor after all his expenses and overhead in a solo practice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 04:36 PM
 
6 posts, read 954 times
Reputation: 25
I’ll just say this. As a retired aircraft and power plant mechanic, if you want to turn wrenches, get your A&P license. There’s going to be a shortage as us old ones retire. It is a lot cleaner work and a lot of room to move up. And, not nearly as many tools needed as in the automotive industry. The main downside is most maintenance is done at night and large aircraft hangers don’t heat or cool well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 06:27 PM
 
11,051 posts, read 42,194,508 times
Reputation: 14482
OP, if you're still with this thread and interest in an automotive tech career path …

look closely at who's posting here. There's a fair number of folk who were dissatisfied with this career choice and found others that met their expectations in various aspects … working conditions, benefits, pay scale, etc.

So I'll mention something else here that you may wish to consider as you make your career choices:

It may be worthwhile to listen to the guys that are happy and reasonably well compensated in the field of your interest. Emulate the guys who found success, happiness, and a good career.

IMO, that's more productive than listening to the people who didn't find satisfaction in that area of interest and may not necessarily have your talents, interests, aptitude. They may just have an "ax to grind" about justifying their path to happiness somewhere else. So be it. Good for them. They found their niche and the area of interest that met their goals.

You can, too. The world is your oyster and the opportunities in so many ways abound.

For example, I know a number of very unhappy accountants (and stockbrokers, doctors, lawyers, architects, engineers, chemists, RN's, and so forth). Talking with any of them will have you believe that their high cost to be in the profession wasn't worth the time/effort/energy/expense. Some of them have come over to the trades for a living … one was a physicist PhD that was a customer of mine, was very unhappy with the projects and grants that he was able to get onto. He loved working on his Triumph Tigers and Range Rovers, wanted to come down to my shop and tinker around with his cars in my shop on Saturdays. The guy couldn't even change engine oil without making a mess, but he stayed with it and in time, became a fairly handy tech with excellent diagnostic skills. That lead to him switching careers; he's now a Lexus dealer tech and knocking down that $100K/year with bene's that the naysayers on this forum claim doesn't happen.

Another was a 747 pilot with TWA, doing gravy overseas flights and livin' the high life with all the travel and big income. Thanks to that proverbial medical issue that cropped up, he was out of work. Took to working on cars in a buddy's shop … and studied up on the details of automatic transmission repairs. In time, he opened his own auto trans shop. He did a lot of the bench work for years … now he just does the front end sales/diagnostic work and the kids in the back do the R&R's and his younger brother does the bench work. Brags to me about clearing well over $250K/year and works only a 5-day week. His retirement is already well funded and his "nest egg" is the 4 acres where his shop sits in a rapidly appreciating small town outside of Denver. His C210 is a pleasure to fly on our fishing trips.

Yet another was an internal med Doc. At age 54, he was diagnosed with advanced bowel/stomach cancer. Knew he couldn't work anymore in his profession and he knew he didn't have long to live. He had a lovely MB 280SEL that fascinated him. He used to sneak out from his hospital or home confinement and come down to my shop to "tinker" around with his car. Loved doing it, he was mortified that his family would find out that he was doing "dirty hands" work. I set up a spare toolbox for him with basic tools and allowed him to "assist" me on various minor projects in the shop … oft times, on cars of his fellow practice partners. He had more fun and satisfaction working on cars in those later days than ever working in medicine, which he'd always found fascinating. Never needed to work, came from an affluent family of philanthropists and made yet another sizable pile in his medical practice. Maybe it was a reflection in the times of his impending demise, but he frequently commented to me that the only reason he'd gone to med school was to satisfy the ambitions and expectations of his family … all doc's, dentists, lawyers, and investment bankers/stockbrokers. He discovered a whole new realm of challenges and satisfaction working around cars for awhile, especially the mechanical fuel injection 'benz's like his own. He got pretty good at working on these Bosch mechanical injection systems … could dial in a 280SE/L to deliver 21-22 mpg while running clean exhaust emissions and good driveability. Oh, and yes … his family was mortified to find out that's where he'd been "sneaking off to". It was one thing to bring his car to my shop for work and hang out for awhile, but "quite another" to spend time actually getting his hands dirty at the place. I was honored that he thought highly enough of me and my shop to want to spend a lot of his last lucid and physically able times at my shop and that I had the opportunity to bring him some happy moments at a difficult time in his life. His sons had recognized that he was pretty happy from time to time and wondered what had been going on … their Dad had no other outside hobbies/interests from his medical practice. When they found out he'd been down at my shop, they thanked me for helping out. It was better therapy for him than anything else they'd been able to do for him.

OP, wishin' you all the best. If an automotive career path presents and looks interesting to you, go for it. You can write you own success story. As you may observe from this thread, there are "good" and "bad" shops (for various reasons) in the industry. If you can deliver the skills and productivity to one of the good shops, you'll have no problem getting a job in view of the shortage of good techs these days. But it will require your effort to accomplish this, and it will not come gift wrapped on a silver platter … you will have to apply yourself and work to learn the skills required to stand out in the biz. It will take time to do so; do not expect to hire in anywhere at the top of the heap. No more so than expecting to be a newly minted _______ (professional) and hiring in at the top, it's unrealistic to expect to do so anywhere.

PS: I have hired "top graduates" from several for profit vo-tech schools through the years who expected to be tasked with the most difficult and challenging projects from day one of hiring. As I'm a bit more cautious about evaluating their skills than that, they started out "at the bottom" in my shop as everyone else has with an opportunity to prove your skills and value to my shop. Some guys moved up within days to the top projects as they had the skills, talent, and productivity readily demonstrated. Others didn't make it to lunch the first day before they (or I) decided that they weren't a good fit in my shop … for a wide variety of reasons. Some lasted a week before I handed them their paycheck and notice to pack up their tools. For the most part, the ones that I parted company with very quickly didn't work out anywhere else, either. Yes, I'm a hard taskmaster and perfectionist of the old school variety, and I don't mince words when it comes to work product … but I can generally watch how a tech selects his tools and proceeds with a job and know very quickly if he's going to work out or not for me or in the trade. So can many other shop owners, your mistakes come out of our pockets … so we're rather possessive about running a tight ship. Of course, that's not everybody in the biz … such is the range of potential employers. So …

When you interview with a shop, bear in mind that it's a two-way street. You're seeking to know what they require of you and you need to uncover the shop dynamics/culture/politics on a level with knowing the pay rates and workload.

For example (and I've been there, walked away) … if the earnest and nice shop owner just happens to have a relative (especially a son) managing a shop and another relative working as a tech, you may be seeing "red flags". The social structure and politics are rife for opportunities not in your best interest. Or then again, maybe it's a really well run shop. Do your due diligence. In time, you'll sense which are the "good" ones and which aren't … if you're good.

I might also point out that this trade isn't for everybody. There are skillsets and knowledge which bring you the opportunities for success. If you've got 'em, you've got the first edge in making this a career. If you don't, so be it. I've seen more than one tech who was marginal in the shop head over to the sales department and cruise their way to being one of the top producers and later a sales manager knocking down big bucks. I've seen others somehow find their niche in the F&I department. Still others became very knowledgeable parts counter guys whose memory of parts and applications and chassis number splits was incredible, a treasured resource in their shops (but not necessarily a highly paid one unless they became a manager in due course).

Last edited by sunsprit; 02-21-2019 at 07:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 11:31 PM
 
3,795 posts, read 3,137,499 times
Reputation: 10559
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
Yes, there’s a bunch of dissatisfied folk in the auto trades. I certainly wouldn’t try to keep them from exploring other options. By the same token, I know folk dissatisfied with professional career paths who have embraced the auto trades. One was a pediatrician ... who got nailed on a dubious medical claim payout. His next malpractice insurance bill was higher than he’d been taking home for years. He folded his practice and pursued his other love ... motorcycles. Got trained as a HD tech by an indie shop and later hired by a SLC HD dealer. He’s happier working on bikes these days and claims his income is a good as he was making as a doctor after all his expenses and overhead in a solo practice.
No, it's not that your views are't valid, I'm sure they are very relevant to your OWN experience, and that goes for the rest of those who you have tried so desperately to discredit. No one is saying that you don't have a different view for no reason at all, no, most are simply stating the truth off things automotive, IN THEIR EXPERIENCE. And I'm going to assume that you too are highly influenced by your own experience.

This isn't about some kind of unfathomable and unexplainable torture that comes out of left field to destroy one's life, no this is all about the personal experience, and that was the focus of the OP's query. He/she wanted to try to have a better understanding of the trades, most gave their honest opinion. Some were way off in their supposition of the tech as a not too bright individual, as in the hobby theory which supposes that the hobbyist and the pro are indeed quite the equals in general knowledge and overall competence, definitely not true, as a professional I saw the raw attempts at doing good work only to realize the sad fact of the amateurs hubris and less than stellar work serving as his lasting legacy. Knowing how much brainpower is required by today's techs is even more reason to disagree on the paltry level of compensation, many other jobs are paying equivalent money for a hell of a lot less demonstrable expertise.


Anecdotal evidence of anything is just that, anecdotal, and lacks the hard edge of real data. Stats are showing a large body of dissatisfaction in the auto repair space, defection from the bizz is now well documented, so the facts stand on their own, the current techs are at the base of these revelations, not someone from the outside. Anyway, keep on loving the trade, I'll say that we are all fortunate to have people who truly give a damn about their quality of work, and that they do like--what they do all day, most know that is better than a disgruntled guy who takes out his frustrations on the hapless customer..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top