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Old 02-19-2019, 03:09 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,445 posts, read 686,516 times
Reputation: 692

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Here I am trying to think of career choices as a soon to be 18 year old and under current family conditions don't even have money for a permit yet lol


Eventually things will change once I suppose that I get out of the family situation

Anyways, back to the topic, is still worth it becoming an auto tech? How will electric cars for that matter, impact the business?
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:27 AM
 
5,195 posts, read 5,228,534 times
Reputation: 5241
Do they have automotive shop in your schools?
Do they have vocational high schools in your area?
Have you taken automotive shop in high school?
Do they have Community Colleges in your state that teach automotive tech?
Do you have the $2,000 - $4,000 to purchase tools?
Do you understand what flat rate mean?

Good Luck with any career choices that you make.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:49 AM
Status: "The days are getting longer" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
3,496 posts, read 903,840 times
Reputation: 4825
Do something that you enjoy. If you like tinkering with cars, that might be a great career choice. The pay should be $15 to $20/hr, may be more. Unit731 brings up some good points.
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,824 posts, read 22,775,680 times
Reputation: 29171
It's certainly not a get-rich-quick job, but you can earn enough to house and feed yourself. Usually.
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Old 02-19-2019, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
2,787 posts, read 1,939,136 times
Reputation: 2863
IF you can be patient, and do the grunt work, and continue the education as new tech comes out, go for it. The mechanic a the dealership I take my GM vehicle to makes around 60 grand a year. Granted the dealer pays for his education, etc.

I got my degree way back in 89, and after 6 months or so decided I didnt want to go home greasy and dirty every day.

I will say if you dont have any experience now, and can do a good bit of work, and have a basic understanding of how a vehicle works, your behind already. I put my first piston in at 6 years old, and built my first engine at when I was 10. (Of course dear old Dad was right there beside me.) My high school auto teacher was impressed with what I knew, but my tech school shop teacher showed me more in the first week than I knew already.
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Old 02-19-2019, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,598 posts, read 1,888,559 times
Reputation: 8456
There's continual demand for auto techs here, and head-hunting and signing bonuses for diesel mechanics.
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Old 02-19-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Coastal, NC
2,786 posts, read 2,165,747 times
Reputation: 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
It's certainly not a get-rich-quick job, but you can earn enough to house and feed yourself. Usually.
In My town. There are always openings for tech at the dealerships. My nephew worked at one. He said, most are low paying positions and a revolving door, with just a few that have certifications, thats all they want.
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Old 02-19-2019, 10:15 AM
 
Location: in the soup
3,599 posts, read 1,508,060 times
Reputation: 3914
Speaking as a former mechanic (first career) and current engineer (second career):

If you enjoy being poorly compensated and given no respect while people demand that you do the impossible... go for it!

If you like the idea of spending enough money to pay for a college education on tools that allow you to work a mediocre job, then working as a mechanic might just be for you!

If you like working for free hecause because some bean-counter who has never seen a wrench decided to pay 1 hour for a 3 hour job... you may be mechanic material.

If you enjoy being paid half what an engineer makes for twice the effort and in dangerous, unpleasant, unhealthy working conditions... then there's a place for you in the shop!


Now that's not to say that working as a mechanic is all bad. Just saying that there are MUCH easier ways to make a living. But it does have a few good points:

1. You'll build mechanical skills so that you rarely have to pay auto repair bills.
2. There is *always* a job available when you're a mechanic. May not be a good job... but there's always a job.
3. As long as you're getting the job done, you can act like a complete ass. Spit on the floor, refuse to shower for a month, smoke in the shop- preferably next to flammables, show up drunk and/or high, throw things at co-workers, steal from the shop/customers/coworkers, get in fights with coworkers and/or customers, damage costomer and/or shop equipment intentionally, engage in fraud, yell at and/or threaten the boss, spit on the boss's shoe, hire a crack-*****... I've seen all that and more from co-workers over the years. And as long as they were getting the job done, they generally remained employed. Working as a mechanic will give you an entirely different perspective on humanity compared to what you'll learn in a cubicle-farm
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Old 02-19-2019, 10:19 AM
 
2,508 posts, read 1,408,021 times
Reputation: 5083
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateJohn View Post
I will say if you dont have any experience now, and can do a good bit of work, and have a basic understanding of how a vehicle works, your behind already.

^^^^ What he said.

If you're about to be 18 and didn't already have an aptitude and desire for this stuff for years already... You're way behind the curve. Couple that with your "Steam car" thread and lack of knowledge regarding some very basic automotive concepts and I would say that being an auto tech is not in your future.
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Old 02-19-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,598 posts, read 1,888,559 times
Reputation: 8456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katana49 View Post
If you're about to be 18 and didn't already have an aptitude and desire for this stuff for years already... You're way behind the curve. Couple that with your "Steam car" thread and lack of knowledge regarding some very basic automotive concepts and I would say that being an auto tech is not in your future.
There are good tech/voc schools for it. I can't see how attending one is any different from an 18yo with his/her finger up their nose attending a 4-year school to get a degree chosen for no reason except a projection of employment and high salaries five years out.
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