U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-19-2019, 07:07 PM
 
9,273 posts, read 7,729,704 times
Reputation: 12377

Advertisements

Cyclone Power – How it Works

The previous closed topic on steam power got me to look up information. The above is one of the engine designs being produced and tested. It had enough potential to get backing from a defense contractor. I can see how the design works but I wonder about the safety of a steam system operating at such high pressures in a small engine. It claims to produce superheated steam at over 1000 psi (up to 3200 psi). On Navy steam ships of 600psi or higher a mere pinhole leak can cut and cauterize body parts. In October 1990 on the USS Iwo Jima LPH-2 there was a major steam leak that killed 10 men. Those boilers were two stories tall so it had a greater volume than this engine but I use this as an example of the damage such pressures can inflict if and when a leak does happen. Working in a mechanical field I know that no matter how well sealed a system is, eventually Murphy’s Law will take hold and leaks will develop. They claim the start up time is shorter than the time it takes a Diesel engine to warm up. Perhaps it may not be safe or feasible for consumer automobile use but it may have practical applications in other industries. What about a stationary plant steam powered electric generator? What about farm engines (water pumps, tractors, etc)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-19-2019, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Vermont
366 posts, read 90,931 times
Reputation: 677
Typical gasoline engines see 1000PSI or greater during everyday operation.

The site you linked is very broken for me. Most of it is white.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2019, 07:35 PM
 
9,273 posts, read 7,729,704 times
Reputation: 12377
Quote:
Originally Posted by EckyX View Post
Typical gasoline engines see 1000PSI or greater during everyday operation.

The site you linked is very broken for me. Most of it is white.
That pressure is contained within the cylinder with piston compression. This is within a bundle of tubes and valves to send this high pressure into the cylinder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
2,786 posts, read 1,935,679 times
Reputation: 2863
Quote:
Originally Posted by EckyX View Post
Typical gasoline engines see 1000PSI or greater during everyday operation.

The site you linked is very broken for me. Most of it is white.
And where do gas engines have this 1000psi???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,615 posts, read 12,392,550 times
Reputation: 10630
Not going to work as a small engine for like a truck or car. The water for these units is distilled water and has to be recycled. You would be carrying water that has to be heated, then condensed back down to water again. That's a lot of crap to try to put on 4 wheels. As stationery units, it could work but I'd be more interested about the gains, if any, from a BTU standpoint. Takes a lot of BTUs to make 1000psi of pressure. While I get the white page as well, is the unit a multi-expansion unit? If no, it's worthless as that is energy lost. Multi-expansion engines are huge usually and that's a major reason they were replaced with a far smaller turbine unit.
Too bad the page won't load even after getting into their website. Sounds interesting but I see too many things that would make it less efficient than a plain ol' internal combustion unit. For an irrigation system, I don't see it working as well. Most commonly a farmer know how much gas his pump uses in an hour. He puts enough gas in the tank for it to run the amount of time he needs and then the unit just runs out of gas. Don't see that happening with this unit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Vermont
366 posts, read 90,931 times
Reputation: 677
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateJohn View Post
And where do gas engines have this 1000psi???
Peak cylinder pressure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 11:12 AM
 
9,273 posts, read 7,729,704 times
Reputation: 12377
https://cyclonepower.com/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2019, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
2,786 posts, read 1,935,679 times
Reputation: 2863
Quote:
Originally Posted by EckyX View Post
Peak cylinder pressure.
Why don't compression gauges go that high?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Vermont
366 posts, read 90,931 times
Reputation: 677
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateJohn View Post
Why don't compression gauges go that high?
Because you don't have a charge of fuel and air exploding in the cylinder when you're measuring it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2019, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
2,786 posts, read 1,935,679 times
Reputation: 2863
Quote:
Originally Posted by EckyX View Post
Because you don't have a charge of fuel and air exploding in the cylinder when you're measuring it.
Thank you! I knew that but it was indicated this occurred during the compression stroke, not at TDC at firing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top