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Old 02-20-2019, 12:57 AM
 
1 posts, read 37 times
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Hello guys, I want to make my career as an automotive technician.
Can someone help me in finding better institutes for automotive repair programs?
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Old 02-20-2019, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
3,566 posts, read 979,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mariagarcia12 View Post
Hello guys, I want to make my career as an automotive technician.
Can someone help me in finding better institutes for automotive repair programs?
Try to find a older master mechanic as his apprentice you will learn more than a school can ever teach you, you will learn all the tricks that a school can never show you, thatís how my older brother became a master mechanic, he didnít go to no school best teacher is a older master mechanic who has been wrenching for many many years.
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Old Yesterday, 07:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by easy62 View Post
Try to find a older master mechanic as his apprentice you will learn more than a school can ever teach you, you will learn all the tricks that a school can never show you, thatís how my older brother became a master mechanic, he didnít go to no school best teacher is a older master mechanic who has been wrenching for many many years.
This is actually pretty good advice. However, if you have no experience whatsoever, you may have a hard time finding someone who will take you under their wing. Maybe some courses at a local community college will give you some experience, plus you can find out whether you have the interest and aptitude without spending an arm and a leg at one of the specialized schools. And, this is coming from a guy who graduated from WyoTech (back in the 80's when it meant something, before it was taken over by Corinthian College). Even I feel like I paid a whole lotta dough to attend then; today's prices are "out of this world". But I had a darned good career, and have no regrets about attending. But like with anything else, the more motivated you are, the better you will do. Having a great work ethic is worth more than almost anything else, it's the one thing that is the hardest to teach.

A friend's kid when to UTI back in the 90's, he's made a good career out of working on trucks. Mechanics need to start at a fairly young age, because it is easy to get burnt out on working on cars. Do you have any current experience working on mechanical things? How old are you? Are you a good student? Today's techs have to be very savvy working on electronics, a good troubleshooter is worth his weight in gold.
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Old Today, 09:55 AM
 
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Also look at local community colleges. Many partner with manufacturers to certify technicians.
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Old Today, 10:56 AM
 
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avoid the independent for-profit Votech schools. The days of a competent for profit WyoTech votech education are long gone in the industry.

check out the automotive programs at your local community colleges or similar public instruction. As well, check if there's any vehicle manufacturer entry level training program available; some have new hire programs which combine factory training and apprenticeship work leading to a full-time employment opportunity (ask at the car dealerships).

if you're starting out from scratch with no experience, you'll need to have some basic instruction in the fundamentals of shop practices, using tools and hand skills, and some theory of "how stuff works" along with practical knowledge of the systems and components on the vehicles. You'll need to start acquiring your own personal tools; decent quality starter tool sets for a beginner are readily available for not too much money these days from places such as Lowe's, Menard's, etc. for around $500 (or less, on sale) which will give you a foundation to work from. You'll be adding to these in time, but at least it's a start and a commitment to the trade.

understand that you must have a basic skillset foundation, aptitude, and motivation to learn before you'll be able to benefit from the concepts and practices that an "old master mechanic" can show you in a working shop. IOW, you've got to be productive at some level with a demonstrated ability to learn or you're wasting everybody's time. Good work ethics and habits as an employee are critical to good performance in this biz.
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