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Old 02-21-2019, 09:34 PM
 
Location: near LA, Calif
141 posts, read 118,573 times
Reputation: 37

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I've a 2002 honda crv and we took it up to a nearby snow mountain last week. snow chain was required but haven't had to use it in 10 years, so memory is fuzzy.

Initially I put the cable on the two front wheels but while driving on dry road, the front wheels kept slipping, so the cop told me to put them on the rear. The road was closed about a mile up so we never tried it in icy/snowy condition.

My question is is it ok to put cable/chain on the rear wheels if the vehicle is front wheel drive? the front wheels slipped, is it because the cable was on too loose (i had them on pretty snug tho)?
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Iowa
2,716 posts, read 2,983,882 times
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I suspect you did not install a tensioner, that is why they slip. Why the cop told you to put them on the back is puzzling, when you have front wheel drive. The only good they will do you in back, is provide stopping power. You need them on the front so you can accelerate and stop with ease, plus, there is more weight on the front tires so your chains/cables will be more effective. This video shows you what a tensioner does for your chains, but do yourself a favor and buy the old school metal type spring tensioners, instead of these rubber ones. The spring type usually have 5 springs which hook into the outter links (or cables) as shown, and are tied together in the center with a chain loop, not a big rubber band. The rubber ones wear out fast. Make sure to spray your chains and spring tensioners with WD40 after you remove them for storage, to prevent rust.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wg0nCLgXFs
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Old 02-22-2019, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Central Mass
1,763 posts, read 2,325,802 times
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Is it OK? sure, it won't break anything. It also is next to useless. In a FWD car, rear wheels are just there for the ride. Sure, if for some reason you are going to oversteer around a corner chains on the back would help, but there's almost no way a FWD car will oversteer in bad conditions without understeering first
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,729 posts, read 61,198,947 times
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If you need someplace to store the chains for later use on the front wheel, it is fine. However you could accomplish the same result by putting the chains in the trunk or wrapping them around the muffler.

Chains are made for traction when pushing or pulling the wheels. They do almost nothing for steering and the rear wheels on a FWD car doe even less for steering.

However i can see a few reasons to instal chains on the rear wheels:

1. You think they look really cool and make your car look better.


2. You do not want anyone in your car club to know you bought a FWD car.

3. You want to practice putting chains on wheels and you have run out of wheels to put them on.

4. Chicks dig tire chains!

5. You have ten sets of spare chains for the front wheels and you expect to go through all of them but your trunk is already filled with the other eight sets so you need someplace to put the last set and do not want it in the back seat.

6. Your sister owns a tire chain manufacturing company and you want to advertise her brand. (of course you dcould just put a bumper sticker on your car.
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:51 AM
 
Location: near LA, Calif
141 posts, read 118,573 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mofford View Post
I suspect you did not install a tensioner, that is why they slip.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wg0nCLgXFs
I think that's the reason. thanks.
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Old 02-22-2019, 09:41 AM
 
Location: BFE
945 posts, read 256,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
If you need someplace to store the chains for later use on the front wheel, it is fine. However you could accomplish the same result by putting the chains in the trunk or wrapping them around the muffler.
WRONG!

The muffler is where you wrap the bacon.
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Old Yesterday, 04:08 AM
 
8,753 posts, read 7,730,082 times
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When you only put chains on front tires, front tires have brake action and as rear tires not having chains car can spin around and cause serious problems, especially going down hill with a curve. At chain up required check points most in mountain conditions demand chains on all wheels.

Or with 4x4 and AWD, you are not required to use chains if you have studded snow tires.

Especially with cars like our Explorer AWD, which has a dial you dial in snow conditions, and it is fantastic in snow and ice conditions. Going dowh hill (steep hill) press a button and suddenly you have great hold back ability as it adjusts the transmission plus breaks to hold it back at a safe speed.
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Old Yesterday, 05:41 AM
 
5,195 posts, read 5,224,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
When you only put chains on front tires, front tires have brake action and as rear tires not having chains car can spin around and cause serious problems, especially going down hill with a curve. At chain up required check points most in mountain conditions demand chains on all wheels.
Thank you.

Same goes for snow tires on front wheel drive vehicles.
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Old Yesterday, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,729 posts, read 61,198,947 times
Reputation: 28782
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
When you only put chains on front tires, front tires have brake action and as rear tires not having chains car can spin around and cause serious problems, especially going down hill with a curve. At chain up required check points most in mountain conditions demand chains on all wheels.

Or with 4x4 and AWD, you are not required to use chains if you have studded snow tires.

Especially with cars like our Explorer AWD, which has a dial you dial in snow conditions, and it is fantastic in snow and ice conditions. Going dowh hill (steep hill) press a button and suddenly you have great hold back ability as it adjusts the transmission plus breaks to hold it back at a safe speed.
That is a good concept in theory but not in reality. 75% of the braking is done by the front wheels in any situation chains or no chains.
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Old Yesterday, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,383 posts, read 7,472,506 times
Reputation: 12980
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
When you only put chains on front tires, front tires have brake action and as rear tires not having chains car can spin around and cause serious problems, especially going down hill with a curve. At chain up required check points most in mountain conditions demand chains on all wheels.

Or with 4x4 and AWD, you are not required to use chains if you have studded snow tires.

Interesting. In what state is either of these requirements true?
It wasn't true on Donner Pass in CA and NV the last time I crossed in a snowstorm.
It isn't true in Montana, Idaho, or Washington on I-90.


Yes, it is true in many (if not most) states that if chains are required, you may get by with M&S rated tires on your four wheel drive, but studs are not required. If conditions are really bad, you may have to put chains on your 4X4! However, when conditions are THAT bad, it is time to stop and wait.


Of course, if you are towing a trailer, you will likely have to put chains on the rear wheels of your 4X4, AND on at least two wheels of the trailer (if it has brakes).



If you are driving a dual wheeled truck, based purely on personal experience, don't bother to ask the "Chain monkeys" at the chain-up area to put them on for you. They are likely to say "No, we don't do duallys!" Be prepared to do it yourself.
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