U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-03-2008, 10:39 PM
 
2,874 posts, read 7,700,759 times
Reputation: 1790

Advertisements

Is it recommended driving a vehicle with an engine of a different make?

I hear it's common for people taking out the original engines of the Toyota LandCruisers and pickups and putting in Chevrolet and Ford engines to add more power and performance and it makes me wonder if it would hurt its reliability or not?

I have once seen a 1979 Toyota 4x4 Pickup with a bored 454 Chevrolet V8 engine and the truck has around 700bhp underneath the hood!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2008, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,082,801 times
Reputation: 1912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mopac1980 View Post
Is it recommended driving a vehicle with an engine of a different make?

I hear it's common for people taking out the original engines of the Toyota LandCruisers and pickups and putting in Chevrolet and Ford engines to add more power and performance and it makes me wonder if it would hurt its reliability or not?

I have once seen a 1979 Toyota 4x4 Pickup with a bored 454 Chevrolet V8 engine and the truck has around 700bhp underneath the hood!
In the case of the Land Cruiser, the 350 Chevy V8 swap was popular because the engine swap was very easy to do, and the parts availability was excellent. This allowed the Land Cruiser to be equipped with a very reliable engine, that seemed to provide the proper amount of power for the application in which it was being used. These vehicles were very reliable even with the engine swap.

The 1979 Toyota pickup you mentioned with the Chevy 454 in it would not be very reliable. Unless the entire running gear was also swapped at the same time, the 454 would tear apart the Toyota's drive train. That kind of power was never meant to be put through the drive train of these early Toyota 4x4 pickups. In 1979, the Toyota 4x4 pickup was equipped with a small 4 cylinder engine, and its drivetrain was sized accordingly.

Generally, vehicles that have had engines swapped into them are often not terribly reliable because the amount of power provided by the transplanted engine was more than the rest of the vehicle was designed for. This isn't always the case, though, so keep that in mind. I've seen engine swaps where the new engine did have more power, but it wasn't so much more that it caused problems with the rest of the vehicle. An example of this is the Buick 3.8L (231 CI) V6 that was swapped into some of the older Toyota 4x4 trucks. If done properly, this engine swap provided a reasonable power increase without sacrificing reliability.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2008, 12:49 AM
 
10,702 posts, read 40,019,063 times
Reputation: 13580
Depends a lot as to what you're trying to accomplish for your wheels ....

Small block Chevy conversions in Jaguar sedans made a lot of practical sense, for example; a lighter engine with a torque/power curve that was better than the OE inline 6 cylinder, easier to work on, better fuel economy, less expensive to repair and maintain, and much more durable than stock. One lost the panache of the DOHC 6 and gained a better overall car, if using a Jag as a daily driver was your goal.

OTOH, "funny car" conversions .... where a well balanced package of under 200 HP low RPM Hi torque rise vehicle built with corresponding trans/driveline/brakes/suspension receives a "700HP" conversion isn't something I'd put in the category of more reliability, tractability, and durability. It will no doubt be faster and quicker on the street than stock, but fuel economy might suffer ..... along with handling, brakes, suspension, driveline, wheels/tires, etc. The purpose of this type of "conversion" is something else ....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2008, 01:29 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
19,802 posts, read 36,140,497 times
Reputation: 19338
currently popular... VW diesel into Suzuki Samurai to make an awesome, economical, and versatile rock climber or farm spray rig.

the 454 would be a little heavy and tight for a Toy... pickup... I think the older 'LCruisers' had a much stouter frame and tranny.

or if you have the space for a full sized truck.. The 1st generation Dodge Cummins can get pretty powerful with reasonably cost mods, and still get 18-20 mpg. I recently went to a 'Dyno-day' in BC and there was a twin turbo 12V cummins in a '93 putting out 756HP and 1200 ft lbs... (stock = 160 hp)

you can double the stock HP for free by tweaking the pump and adding a turbo housing from a early 2nd gen. You can find the housings for free when the 2nd gen guys 'upgrade'

Supposedly the best Dodge Cummins to tweak is the '97 and '98 12V with a P pump.

I am doing swaps of Turbo Diesel VW engines into GTI's to make the euro version GTD. A 50mpg 'sport' model car with good suspension is in high demand at the moment.

I am also looking for a Scirocco to make a 75 mpg diesel out of. (It will go on a diet and get a belly pan)

I operate on a pretty low budget, these things can be done for under $1000, and it only takes 8-10 hrs.
As you may notice... I tend to avoid Gasoline power (I'm a home brewer... bio-diesel) and computer controlled engine swaps.
You really need a complete donor car to do it right, as you may have to change out the wiring harness, ECU, and instrument cluster; as well as engine and tranny (gets pretty involved) Often 'Swaps' are less reliable because so much stuff has been tweaked. Getting someone to work on one will cost you more, as the typical mechanic is not keen on tweaking when getting paid 'shop rate'. + a they have a valuable reputation to protect
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2008, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,220 posts, read 19,844,260 times
Reputation: 2189
If done correctly I don't think it would hurt reliability one bit. That's the key thing. Too many people who do engine swaps take short cuts to get it in there any which way they can.

But why anyone would put a 454 into a Toyota is beyond me. That's a big heavy engine with a lot of torque for a small truck. Plus trucks already have a bad front to rear weight ratio and a big block just made it worse.....unless you like being the king of burnouts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2008, 08:15 AM
 
10,702 posts, read 40,019,063 times
Reputation: 13580
[quote=janb;3982772]

you can double the stock HP for free by tweaking the pump and adding a turbo housing from a early 2nd gen. You can find the housings for free when the 2nd gen guys 'upgrade'.

It's not exactly "free" horsepower ... it comes at the operating expense of putting more air (via the turbo conversion) and fuel (via adjusting the pump to deliver more fuel) into the motor to burn to make that additional HP over stock. Nothing has been accomplished here that makes the motor more efficient in generating HP per lbs of fuel consumed per HP hour.

I've seen a number of these trucks built up for more road HP to pull toy trailers and the longevity of the motors suffers, wearing out pistons/rings much sooner than stock motors (about 220 HP, which can generally deliver 500K miles of good service).

Speed (HP) costs money. How fast do you want to go?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2008, 08:32 AM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,549 posts, read 17,554,184 times
Reputation: 5884
Best conversion combination ever made was to a 32 Ford 3 window and a chevy engine inside.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2008, 05:54 AM
 
630 posts, read 937,452 times
Reputation: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
If done correctly I don't think it would hurt reliability one bit. That's the key thing. Too many people who do engine swaps take short cuts to get it in there any which way they can.

But why anyone would put a 454 into a Toyota is beyond me. That's a big heavy engine with a lot of torque for a small truck. Plus trucks already have a bad front to rear weight ratio and a big block just made it worse.....unless you like being the king of burnouts.
maybe thats true for the toyota mini trucks but for the fj40s its more practical weight wise. you get a lighter engine than stock , more hp and more torque. yes the 4.2 liter was heavier than most chevy small blocks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top