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Old 11-06-2008, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Seaford, Delaware
3,360 posts, read 10,442,961 times
Reputation: 2202

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There's a reason I live in South Texas. No need to weigh down the truck because of snow. And the desert is solid enough to drive in without worring about getting stuck in sand. thanks for reminding me why I live here.
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Old 11-06-2008, 10:27 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,624,371 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
Think of the difference between a gooseneck trailer, and a typical bumper hitch as it may help you visualize what is actually going on here.
That's a good point.

To carry maximum weight in a truck, you put it over the axle to distribute the load partially on the front axle. You're doing that to keep from overloading the rear tires which could cause an understeer.

The goal of putting mass into a truck for traction on ice is to equalize weight on all 4 tires to correct an inherent oversteer. The further back you put the mass, the more leverage it exerts, meaning you can achieve the desired weight distribution with less mass.
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Old 11-06-2008, 11:20 PM
 
Location: portland, me
562 posts, read 1,151,461 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
That's a good point.

To carry maximum weight in a truck, you put it over the axle to distribute the load partially on the front axle. You're doing that to keep from overloading the rear tires which could cause an understeer.

The goal of putting mass into a truck for traction on ice is to equalize weight on all 4 tires to correct an inherent oversteer. The further back you put the mass, the more leverage it exerts, meaning you can achieve the desired weight distribution with less mass.
Nicely stated.
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:35 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,755 posts, read 4,753,471 times
Reputation: 1227
I do have a locker in the rear of my Dodge 4x4. Does that make it 3 wheel drive? lol
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:24 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,624,371 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
I do have a locker in the rear of my Dodge 4x4. Does that make it 3 wheel drive? lol
I'm not sure about the 3WD, but it should give you a nice place to keep your coat between classes...
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:43 AM
 
Location: North Pole Alaska
868 posts, read 2,446,165 times
Reputation: 705
Never had to use anything. 10 yers of driving in Northern MN and never had a problem. One thing that I have seen though is blocks of ice.
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Burnsville, MN
73 posts, read 211,918 times
Reputation: 52
Get duct tape, invite inlaws over for dinner. Tie them up, place in bed, tape to back of bed. (Per sterilinggrls suggestion)
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Southern Arizona
7,971 posts, read 16,166,582 times
Reputation: 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by aperfectbass View Post
Get duct tape, invite inlaws over for dinner. Tie them up, place in bed, tape to back of bed. (Per sterilinggrls suggestion)
LOL, aperfect . . . how do you handle THE STINK?

! ! ! !
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:08 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,134 posts, read 22,273,218 times
Reputation: 16222
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
Oh I know my physics. I am a commercial driver by trade. I know all about load placement over axles.

Here's a quick lesson for you. <snip> Weight placed behind the rear axle actually creates more rearward weight as it slightly unsprings the front, and shifts weight to rear. Think of the difference between a gooseneck trailer, and a typical bumper hitch as it may help you visualize what is actually going on here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
The goal of putting mass into a truck for traction on ice is to equalize weight on all 4 tires to correct an inherent oversteer. The further back you put the mass, the more leverage it exerts, meaning you can achieve the desired weight distribution with less mass.

dubthang you have an advantage over a lot of people who drive p-ups then. Not everybody does have Commercial driving experience or the years of driving pick-ups in snow and icy conditions. I have driven trucks every year for the last 30 years in snow and ice all winter, every winter; the last 20 in Aroostook County, Maine (Presque Isle area to be specific). Ever see the trucks cruising down the road in the winter with the rear end about dragging their bumper on the pavement? I have and it is a direct result of somebody not knowing that a little may be just right. If a little works good then a LOT must work better they think. If they put it all back by the tailgate you and I both know what the handling and stopping will be like in snow. The general advice to put it between the wheel wells helps the novice (or idiot) to prevent that situation. If it is a 4X4 truck though I will still stand with the placement between the wheel wells. You want some extra weight, mostly back, but not all the extra back. A little extra toward the front you get when placing it between the wheel wells keeps balance of the vehicle better and helps with stopping as well as getting going.

The biggest help though for any vehicle, but one that you notice most on pick-ups, is having the right tires for winter driving. Weight is nice, but you can do without. Good tires will serve you better in the long run. Dedicated snows are much better than all-seasons, which in turn are better than summer type tires.
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:10 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,134 posts, read 22,273,218 times
Reputation: 16222
Quote:
Originally Posted by aperfectbass View Post
Get duct tape, invite inlaws over for dinner. Tie them up, place in bed, tape to back of bed. (Per sterilinggrls suggestion)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bummer View Post
LOL, aperfect . . . how do you handle THE STINK?

! ! ! !
It's winter, they freeze and won't stink until the Spring thaw.
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