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Old 12-26-2008, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,214 posts, read 12,081,576 times
Reputation: 2032

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Does it eat thru the paint? Just wondering how it actually causes acceleration of rust.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Incognito
6,995 posts, read 13,038,037 times
Reputation: 5305
Although road salt is necessary for safe transportation when snow and ice accumulate on roads and highways, taking active steps to protect your car from road salt is necessary to avoid rust and corrosion and general loss of your investment.

History

Salt was first used in snow and ice control in the 1930's to make roads safe and passable by creating a lower water freezing temperature. Salt is the most available and cost-effective de-icer and is easy to store, handle, and apply.

Car Washing

When salt is on the road, washing your car is the major factor in combating corrosion and maintaining the value of your car. Salt that remains on a vehicle surface and undercarriage for any length of time can;

• damage your car's clear finish.
• promote rust.
• affect the mechanics of your vehicle.

Preventing Salt Damage

• Wash your vehicle every 10 days or less.
• Wash your vehicle whenever the temperature reaches 40 degrees F. or higher.
• Wash your vehicle during the day to allow it to dry completely before freezing evening temperatures begin.
• Immediately after washing the vehicle, open and close all doors, the trunk, and other parts of the car with locks several times before parking it to prevent locks from freezing.

Snow and sleet contain corrosive road salt and rain and snow collect pollutants in the air and drop them as acid rain which can damage the cars protective finish.

• Wash your vehicle as soon as possible after a snow or rain shower.
• Wash the underside of your car often during the winter months in a car wash that does not use recycled water.
• Avoid driving through large puddles of standing water where road salt collects.
• Repair paint chips that are larger than the tip of a pen to avoid corrosion.
• Wax your vehicle every six months or less to give your vehicle a strong protective coating.
• Wax your vehicle before winter to protect your paint from corrosive salt.

Vehicles are one of the biggest investments we make in our lifetimes and protecting them from the ravages of the environment, such as salt and rust is important. Certain vehicle problems are inevitable, but rust from road salt is one that can be prevented.

Some of the areas of vehicles that are most affected by rust are body panels including doors, fenders, the hood, and tailgate. The reason for this is that they inherently have areas that retain moisture. Depending upon the model of vehicle, there are many other areas that can retain moisture as well. Certain cars retain more moisture just due to the way they are designed, so you have to be especially careful and vigilant with them. Some factors that you have no control over include the environment in which you live. If you live in a coastal area you are exposed to more salt air for example. If you live in an area where there is snow and ice on the road, the authorities usually use salt on the roads which can result in rust on your car's undercarriage.

Rust prevention tips to help prevent rust formation on your vehicle:

1. Keep your car clean and coated with a finish protectant at all times.
2. Keep the underneath of your car rinsed continually when you are in an area where a lot of salt is present as mentioned above.
3. Keep your tires and wheels clean and polished and free from moisture holding material like leaves.
4. Make sure any drainage holes in the frame, floor, and the bottoms of the doors so that any moisture can get out.
5. Always open your doors after washing your car to allow any accumulated water to drain out.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,588 posts, read 57,867,463 times
Reputation: 25609
Salt accelerates the chemical reaction between iron and water by providing a highly ionized environment. Iron is virtually unaffected by pure water.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,588 posts, read 57,867,463 times
Reputation: 25609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Cat View Post
Although road salt is necessary for safe transportation when snow and ice accumulate on roads and highways, taking active steps to protect your car from road salt is necessary to avoid rust and corrosion and general loss of your investment.

History

Salt was first used in snow and ice control in the 1930's to make roads safe and passable by creating a lower water freezing temperature. Salt is the most available and cost-effective de-icer and is easy to store, handle, and apply.

Car Washing

When salt is on the road, washing your car is the major factor in combating corrosion and maintaining the value of your car. Salt that remains on a vehicle surface and undercarriage for any length of time can;

damage your car's clear finish.
promote rust.
affect the mechanics of your vehicle.

Preventing Salt Damage

Wash your vehicle every 10 days or less.
Wash your vehicle whenever the temperature reaches 40 degrees F. or higher.
Wash your vehicle during the day to allow it to dry completely before freezing evening temperatures begin.
Immediately after washing the vehicle, open and close all doors, the trunk, and other parts of the car with locks several times before parking it to prevent locks from freezing.

Snow and sleet contain corrosive road salt and rain and snow collect pollutants in the air and drop them as acid rain which can damage the cars protective finish.

Wash your vehicle as soon as possible after a snow or rain shower.
Wash the underside of your car often during the winter months in a car wash that does not use recycled water.
Avoid driving through large puddles of standing water where road salt collects.
Repair paint chips that are larger than the tip of a pen to avoid corrosion.
Wax your vehicle every six months or less to give your vehicle a strong protective coating.
Wax your vehicle before winter to protect your paint from corrosive salt.

Vehicles are one of the biggest investments we make in our lifetimes and protecting them from the ravages of the environment, such as salt and rust is important. Certain vehicle problems are inevitable, but rust from road salt is one that can be prevented.

Some of the areas of vehicles that are most affected by rust are body panels including doors, fenders, the hood, and tailgate. The reason for this is that they inherently have areas that retain moisture. Depending upon the model of vehicle, there are many other areas that can retain moisture as well. Certain cars retain more moisture just due to the way they are designed, so you have to be especially careful and vigilant with them. Some factors that you have no control over include the environment in which you live. If you live in a coastal area you are exposed to more salt air for example. If you live in an area where there is snow and ice on the road, the authorities usually use salt on the roads which can result in rust on your car's undercarriage.

Rust prevention tips to help prevent rust formation on your vehicle:

1. Keep your car clean and coated with a finish protectant at all times.
2. Keep the underneath of your car rinsed continually when you are in an area where a lot of salt is present as mentioned above.
3. Keep your tires and wheels clean and polished and free from moisture holding material like leaves.
4. Make sure any drainage holes in the frame, floor, and the bottoms of the doors so that any moisture can get out.
5. Always open your doors after washing your car to allow any accumulated water to drain out.
If you're going to copy and paste an entire webpage, particularly a copyrighted one, the least you could do is give it attribution.
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Old 12-26-2008, 09:59 AM
 
3,985 posts, read 6,589,988 times
Reputation: 2449
Isn't the stuff they use on roads a concoction that is even more corrosive than regular rock salt?
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Old 12-26-2008, 10:21 AM
 
8,322 posts, read 22,481,894 times
Reputation: 8065
Salt also promotes galvanic corrosion throughout the car, which has many different metals in it's construction. With aluminum, steel, copper, brass, iron, and other metals throughout, it's a prime location for trapped salts to attack the substrates as well as attack the bonding of surface coatings to the substrate. Stray current from the battery will aggravate the situation, although once pockets of corrosion begin (at a microscopic size), they can generate their own voltages and current flow to accelerate the problem.

A glance under the hood of salt area cars in this country will show everything from the metal surfaces having surface corrosion to parts of the car perforated and falling apart. I've seen a lot of these cars with only a few year's service that are mechanically and functionally failing .... Even in places where you wouldn't ordinarily look, like under the dash or inside the doors, or brake "tone wheels", or brake calipers.
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Old 12-26-2008, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Floribama
9,047 posts, read 16,465,838 times
Reputation: 5508
Every time I see some of those northern cars on ebay for sale I'm always amazed at the rust .
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Old 12-26-2008, 11:09 AM
 
Location: somewhere near Pittsburgh, PA
1,313 posts, read 2,072,415 times
Reputation: 1132
I moved to PA from FL in 2006 and mechanics are amazed at the condition of my car. My car is 12 years old but they say the undercarriage looks like a 2-3 year old car from this part of the country. They don't see a lot of cars that were never driven in salt for most of it's life. I do see a lot of rustbuckets in this area. Many older cars are rusting around the wheel wells.

Car washes make a killing up here in the winter, there's always cars lined up to get washed after a snowfall. And as was mentioned above, when the temp gets above 40, corrosion accelerates. One of the worst things you can do is park your car in a warm garage for the night after driving on salt covered roads all day.
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,214 posts, read 12,081,576 times
Reputation: 2032
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Salt accelerates the chemical reaction between iron and water by providing a highly ionized environment. Iron is virtually unaffected by pure water.
Does there need to be a break in paint for this to happen?

Or can salt on a rust free body with a perfect coat of paint make the rust start forming from underneath?
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Old 12-26-2008, 03:10 PM
 
3,985 posts, read 6,589,988 times
Reputation: 2449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
Does there need to be a break in paint for this to happen?

Or can salt on a rust free body with a perfect coat of paint make the rust start forming from underneath?
I think they rot from the inside out....that's why the paint bubbles up.
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