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Old 01-05-2009, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,152 posts, read 57,274,608 times
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^^What does that do to your shoes and clothing if it splashes up?

Not that I'll ever have to worry about that anytime soon, since Pa. is notoriously decades behind the times.
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Old 01-05-2009, 11:17 AM
 
Location: PA -> Denver, CO
205 posts, read 721,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
^^What does that do to your shoes and clothing if it splashes up?

Not that I'll ever have to worry about that anytime soon, since Pa. is notoriously decades behind the times.
During the winter, there are definitely salt trails leading from the front doors of almost every store.

Biking in the Winter in PA will get you covered in a salty mix of mud and water.
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Old 01-05-2009, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
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Michigan uses salt very sparingly, generally only on steep hills in cities. I'm not sure about the interstates, but I don't think they salt those, either. Indiana and Ohio both salt very heavily, and cars coming north into Michigan in the winter are conspicuous by the telltale salt coating on them.

Paradoxically, Michigan is the nation's leading salt producer, and I would think Michigan industry would also have a vested interest in cars rusting away and needing to be replaced.
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Old 01-05-2009, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,697 posts, read 6,712,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
I think some cities in Ohio have been using the beet juice as well........i think that it may be mixed w/salt, don't remember.
Sure it wasn't Beetlejuice?
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Old 01-05-2009, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,303 posts, read 22,732,022 times
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Yeah, if you buy a car from extreme southern Ohio, Indiana or Illinois, you should be OK, as the southern parts of those states get alot less snow than the northern parts.

Also, southeast PA should be OK. NOT northern or western PA though.
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Old 04-29-2009, 09:27 AM
 
1 posts, read 48,354 times
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Data - trb.org/publications/sr/sr235/017-030.pdf
Quick Pics:
http://lh3.ggpht.com/_IOxsn5AyHgs/Sf...saltStats1.png

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_IOxsn5AyHgs/Sf...saltStats2.png

Note that Colorado is not listed, but has been reported in posts as using significant amounts of salting agents. I live in Idaho and didn't think we used salt (lots of gravel), but apparently we do salt a little. I have seen very little rust on maintained Idaho cars vs. the typical rusty cars from the Salt Lake area of Utah.
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Old 04-29-2009, 09:46 AM
Status: "Hope is a walking dream." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Still in Portland, Oregon, for some reason
864 posts, read 2,980,835 times
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Here is my '04 Santa Fe...bought new and only driven in a non-road salt state, Oregon. The only discoloration you'll see in these photos is of the exhaust components which have done so due to heat.



Under the dirt, that bolt is still silver.


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Old 04-30-2009, 08:12 PM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,520,805 times
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The map showed Arkansas as using salt. I've never heard of it down there. Maybe the northwest part of the state uses it.
In Little Rock, they just throw some sand down and wait for it to melt. "It" is usually ice, which sometimes can stick around for 3-4 days. The whole town pretty much comes to a stop.
The reason I'm sure they don't use salt is that snow and ice stays on the roads longer down there than it does in Kansas City, which has much longer cold spells.
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Old 05-01-2009, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,701,155 times
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Interesting that if Iowa only does 3.8 tons per lane-mile, on average, this is still plenty to cause serious rust on the cars I saw around Cedar Rapids.

I do know that while Washington is not an official "salt state" some cities do use salt, cars from Spokane will have that charachteristic rust.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:24 PM
 
Location: USA
498 posts, read 1,195,671 times
Reputation: 426
Utah salts its roads, there aren't really very many rusty cars though...
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