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Old 01-09-2010, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,212 posts, read 10,873,445 times
Reputation: 1986
Default Not good to use 4WD on pavement

http://www.4x4abc.com/4WD101/def_turnpart.html

Stumbled across this site which claims it's not good to use 4WD on pavement.....by that I suppose they mean "dry pavement".
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Old 01-09-2010, 06:45 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,152 posts, read 20,564,621 times
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First off, that site is poorly written and borderline BS in some things.

Should you use part-time 4X4 on dry pavement? Not unless you want to replace some very expensive parts. That much is true. It is true that the difference in the speed between the front driveshaft and the rear driveshaft is what causes the problems. This can happen on wet pavement as well though. You have to have a LOT of water on pavement, or bald tires to make a difference I have found. The writer though seems to think that all 4X4 systems have locking differentials front and back, which we all know is simply false, there are a lot of 4X4 trucks out there that have open diff's in both axles (in which case turning will actually release some of the building tension in the transfer case and NOT act like the web page suggests).

I think part of it comes from the fact that it seems like English is a second language to that web page writer, and it could be that something was lost in the translation.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:25 AM
 
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The only time all that is true is if all the axles were welded to the carriers and not allowed to "differentiate".
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,212 posts, read 10,873,445 times
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I know me personally I wouldn't use 4X4 on dry pavement....I don't see a need to.....unless I were drag racing at the track and even then I question that....I've seen where some will take something like a Dodge diesel to a drag strip, put it in 4 high and line up at the tree. As soon as they launch and get down the track a little ways they shift out of 4 hi into 2WD. They do this for traction enhancement. it does work, but has me wondering just how much damage their doing.

Now I do have a 4X4 and we have snow on the ground and on the roads as I type this. Here lately I've been keeping it in 4 hi the whole time since most of the roads are partially snow covered and partially ice covered. The road into the house I live is nothing but packed snow and ice. So in ym case I don't think I'm hurting anything (I hope not) but if I found a road that wasn't snow and ice I'd take it out of 4WD.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:31 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,294 posts, read 13,300,912 times
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I have a couple questions.

1. Do all part-time 4x4s have the front axle turning at a higher RPM than the rear axle?

2. Why would you be driving in 4-wheel drive on dry pavement anyway?
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:39 AM
 
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It really depends upon the four wheel drive system. There are a bunch of different systems out there and they all work just a little bit different. Some of the systems are "all wheel drive" and the power only goes to two wheels until they start slipping, then power is diverted to the other two wheels. (Subaru for example.) Other systems such as the older "four wheel drive" systems put power equally to all four wheels so when you turn, the front wheels due to the different turning radius scrub the tires. You can actually feel the tires scrubbing if you turn in a tight circle. Really rough on the tires. Then you have systems like in the Mercedes where power goes to all four wheels with the brake system locking down on the tires that are slipping.

The easiest way to figure out how your car will act is to put it in four wheel drive on a nice dry day, lock your steering wheel all the way over to one side and go in a circle. If it turns nice and smooth and the front end does not jerk and the steering wheel does not jerk in your hand, then you have a system that is OK for dry pavement. But if you feel it jerking and the steering wheel jerks and tries to move in your hands, then you have a system that is not good on dry road. In that case, turn off the four wheel drive and turn the circle again. If it drives nice now, then you confirmed it is the four wheel drive system that is the problem and you should never drive on drive pavement in four wheel drive.

Last item, if you are buying a used vehicle, take a good look at the front tires. If there is a lot of uneven wear and scallops on the tires, it probably was driven a lot on dry pavement in four wheel drive and it is in need of a front end alignment. You should insist on new tires and a front end job before you buy it. If the dealer will not agree to that, look at a different vehicle.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:44 AM
 
3,141 posts, read 4,667,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
I have a couple questions.

1. Do all part-time 4x4s have the front axle turning at a higher RPM than the rear axle?
No. That website made that VERY unclear. Front and back axle ratios are the same, thus in a straight line RPM's are technically exactly the same. Whoever wrote that garbage made it sound that they are constantly at these different RPM's. Nonsense.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
2. Why would you be driving in 4-wheel drive on dry pavement anyway?
You wouldn't. Dirt, snow and wet surfaces. That's the only time 4x4 is truly needed.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,004 posts, read 11,724,704 times
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[quote=Omaha Rocks;12370645]I have a couple questions.

1. Do all part-time 4x4s have the front axle turning at a higher RPM than the rear axle?

2. Why would you be driving in 4-wheel drive on dry pavement anyway?[/quote]
that what I was thinking too
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,212 posts, read 10,873,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JTraik View Post
You wouldn't. Dirt, snow and wet surfaces. That's the only time 4x4 is truly needed.
And gravel too right?
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:19 PM
 
3,141 posts, read 4,667,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
And gravel too right?
Yeah... surfaces that the tires can easily "slip" over.
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