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Old 03-09-2010, 04:53 AM
 
3,283 posts, read 4,562,850 times
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I have owned about 10 cars in my life and there is one constant across every one of them. immobilzer trouble. i have also lived in a few dodgy countries which means that i've had a few cars stolen. seems to me that thieves have very little trouble bypassing these systems. i'd probably argue that they'd get a car quicker with one.

why do insurers offer a lower premium with one installed?
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Old 03-09-2010, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,395 posts, read 42,750,303 times
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I would venture the guess that the insurance companies see a statistically significant reduction in theft numbers, else they wouldn't offer the discount. If they do their math wrong they are not going to stay in business for long.

Personally rather than an immobilizer I suggest "stealing" your own fuel pump relay or main relay. On some cars this is a quick grab under the dash, on some you have to pop the hood. But in any case unless the thief really knows what he's doing he will probably try the starter, the starter will spin but the car won't start, typically unless he's really gunning for your particular car, he'll cut his losses and vamoose.

On old carburated cars an even better anti-theft is something to shut off the fuel pump or lock the fuel line shut somehow that's not immediately obvious, Mr. Thief gets the car running and can drive as far as the float bowl(s) of the carb(s) allow, then stalls out - again this encourages him to bail out before a LEO's attention is attracted.
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Old 03-09-2010, 04:00 PM
 
19,122 posts, read 21,380,062 times
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A ignition stop switch always worked for me. It was hidden. A good thief I suppose might check for spark, but unless he has a helper or a jumper button, it's tuff to turn the key and see a plug wire.

There are hundreds of ways, and with a simple on off switch, relay, and fake ignition, which was really fun once..

All that was, was a 3 way switch A On OFF B ON. In this case B On went to a resistor, thence a glass buss fuse at 3 amps, inside a film container. The film container had a substance that goes boom. The fuse can stand some current, but not much, so you got maybe 3 minutes, then a big boom. The drivers seat was a tad wet ... oops...
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Old 03-09-2010, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,395 posts, read 42,750,303 times
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Good point, the best anti-theft systems are done by a DIY owner. If a thief wants to he can get familiar with a particular brand of immobilizer, know how to get around it, but if you put a switch somewhere in the system only you know where it is.
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Old 03-09-2010, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
5,988 posts, read 9,979,027 times
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A wise man once told me that locks do not keep thieves out. They keep honest people honest. I suspect the same thing is true of immobilizers. A better method will breed better thieves. M3Mitch is right, one of a kind devices would work best.
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Old 03-09-2010, 11:50 PM
 
Location: SWUS
5,414 posts, read 7,631,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
A ignition stop switch always worked for me. It was hidden. A good thief I suppose might check for spark, but unless he has a helper or a jumper button, it's tuff to turn the key and see a plug wire.

There are hundreds of ways, and with a simple on off switch, relay, and fake ignition, which was really fun once..

All that was, was a 3 way switch A On OFF B ON. In this case B On went to a resistor, thence a glass buss fuse at 3 amps, inside a film container. The film container had a substance that goes boom. The fuse can stand some current, but not much, so you got maybe 3 minutes, then a big boom. The drivers seat was a tad wet ... oops...
That's great, please explain a little more how it works
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Old 03-10-2010, 05:29 AM
 
3,283 posts, read 4,562,850 times
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my experience with immobilizers:

3am leaving a nightclub, car won't start, immobilzer

leaving the mall with 4 tired hungry kids, car won't start, immobilzer

in a hurry for an important meeting, car won't start, immobilzer

........

they're more of a nuisance than what they're worth. i think thieves easily bypass most systems, unless it's a home job. in fact, i'd argue that if they don't find a sytem, they're probably inclined to spend more time looking for one
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Old 03-10-2010, 05:34 AM
 
10,485 posts, read 22,562,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 58robbo View Post
I have owned about 10 cars in my life and there is one constant across every one of them. immobilzer trouble. i have also lived in a few dodgy countries which means that i've had a few cars stolen. seems to me that thieves have very little trouble bypassing these systems. i'd probably argue that they'd get a car quicker with one.

why do insurers offer a lower premium with one installed?
The old saying still stands "if a thief really wants your car, he is going to get." Having good insurance is the key. Immobilizers, kill switches, alarms, etc are all useless.
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Old 03-10-2010, 09:12 AM
 
4,925 posts, read 9,485,880 times
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Best immobilizer I ran across was taking the distributor wire...most thieves aren't packing an extra. With the old ignitions, I knew guys that would take the rotor with them and put it in their pocket.

Both options above are considerably cheaper.
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Old 03-10-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: WA
5,293 posts, read 20,713,721 times
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I have been stranded twice due to this technology... I would opt out if possible.
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